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Lets say I have a basic recursive function:

function recur(data) {
    data = data+1;
    var nothing = function() {
        recur(data);
    }
    nothing();
}

How could I do this if I have an anonymous function such as...

(function(data){
    data = data+1;
    var nothing = function() {
        //Something here that calls the function?
    }
    nothing();
})();

I'd like a way to call the function that called this function... I've seen scripts somewhere (I can't remember where) that can tell you the name of a function called, but I can't recall any of that information right now.

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Is there a reason you need this or are you just curious? Seems to me it would be clearer to simply give it a name... –  rfunduk Oct 7 '10 at 16:38
    
@thenduks: For the same reason why one would use an anonymous function. Just that sometimes recursion is necessary. –  poke Oct 7 '10 at 16:39
5  
It's a shame arguments.callee exists, and this functnio doesn't do anything useful. I was looking up Y combinator :P . Damn, that stuff will never get useful... –  Kobi Oct 7 '10 at 16:42
1  
Yep, as Kobi linked, use a fixed point combinator such as Y to do anonymous recursive functions without arguments.callee. –  steamer25 Oct 8 '10 at 23:13
1  
See w3future.com/weblog/stories/2002/02/22/… for an example of the Y combinator in JS. –  steamer25 Oct 8 '10 at 23:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 85 down vote accepted

You can give the function a name, even when you're creating the function as a value and not a "function declaration" statement. In other words:

(function foo() { foo(); })();

is a stack-blowing recursive function. Now, that said, you probably don't may not want to do this in general because there are some weird problems with various implementations of Javascript. (note — that's a fairly old comment; some/many/all of the problems described in Kangax's blog post may be fixed in more modern browsers.)

When you give a name like that, the name is not visible outside the function (well, it's not supposed to be; that's one of the weirdnesses). It's like "letrec" in Lisp.

As for arguments.callee, that's disallowed in "strict" mode and generally is considered a bad thing, because it makes some optimizations hard. It's also much slower than one might expect.

edit — If you want to have the effect of an "anonymous" function that can call itself, you can do something like this (assuming you're passing the function as a callback or something like that):

asyncThingWithCallback(params, (function() {
  function recursive() {
    if (timeToStop())
      return whatever();
    recursive(moreWork);
  }
  return recursive;
})());

What that does is define a function with a nice, safe, not-broken-in-IE function declaration statement, creating a local function whose name will not pollute the global namespace. The wrapper (truly anonymous) function just returns that local function.

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Can we avoid polluting the global namespace another way with ES5 sctrict (I haven't read deep into ES5 yet)? –  Incognito Oct 8 '10 at 15:01
11  
I love you..... –  Gabriel Ryan Nahmias Jul 8 '12 at 7:41
    
@pointy can you please look at this questing. stackoverflow.com/questions/27473450/… –  Explore-X Dec 14 at 20:02

I would not do this as an inline function. It's pushing against the boundaries of good taste and doesn't really get you anything.

If you really must, there is arguments.callee as in Fabrizio's answer. However this is generally considered inadvisable and is disallowed in ECMAScript Fifth Edition's ‘strict mode’. Although ECMA 3 and non-strict-mode are not going away, working in strict mode promises more possible language optimisations.

One can also use a named inline function:

(function foo(data){
    data++;
    var nothing = function() {
        foo(data);
    }
    nothing();
})();

However named inline function expressions are also best avoided, as IE's JScript does some bad things to them. In the above example foo incorrectly pollutes the parent scope in IE, and the parent foo is a separate instance to the foo seen inside foo.

What's the purpose of putting this in an inline anonymous function? If you just want to avoid polluting the parent scope, you can of course hide your first example inside another self-calling-anonymous-function (namespace). Do you really need to create a new copy of nothing each time around the recursion? You might be better off with a namespace containing two simple mutually-recursive functions.

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I agree, a named function is more suitable than arguments.callee not only for the ecmascript strict mode, but also for a matter of optimization because at each recursion he need to get a reference to the callee (and this probably could reduce the execution speed) –  fcalderan Oct 7 '10 at 17:03
    
+1 for the poetic, "pushing against the boundaries of good taste" - (well, and the good info). –  Peter Ajtai Oct 7 '10 at 18:01
    
what about a simple pre/postfix if pollution is really a concern here? Considering that it's not in the global scope (even if the function is top lvl, he should already have an anonymous function wrapping his whole code) it's really unlikely that a name like recur_foo will collide with a function in the parent scope (or to be ill-used) . –  galambalazs Oct 7 '10 at 22:02
    
Very interesting - jsfiddle.net/hck2A - IE does pollute the parent in this case, like you said. Never realized that. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 7 '10 at 22:55
1  
@Peter: kangax.github.com/nfe (especially ‘JScript bugs’) for more than you ever wanted to know on this subject. It's finally fixed in IE9 (but only in IE9 Standards Mode). –  bobince Oct 7 '10 at 23:44

People talked about the Y combinator in comments, but no one wrote it as an answer.

The Y combinator can be defined in javascript as follows: (thanks to steamer25 for the link)

var Y = function (gen) {
  return (function(f) {
    return f(f);
  }(function(f) {
    return gen(function() {
      return f(f).apply(null, arguments);
    });
  }));
}

And when you want to pass your anonymous function:

(Y(function(recur) {
  return function(data) {
    data = data+1;
    var nothing = function() {
      recur(data);
    }
    nothing();
  }
})());

The most important thing to note about this solution is that you shouldn't use it.

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2  
"The most important thing to note about this solution is that you shouldn't use it." Why? –  nyuszika7h May 4 '11 at 14:38
1  
It will not be fast. It's ugly to actually use (though conceptually beautiful!). You avoid having to give your function a tag or variable name (and I don't see why that would be a concern), but you still give it a name as the parameter to the outer function passed to Y. So you don't gain anything by going through all this trouble. –  zem May 9 '11 at 22:52
(function(data){
    var recursive = arguments.callee;
    data = data+1;
    var nothing = function() {
        recursive(data)
    }
    nothing();
})();
share|improve this answer
26  
I hope everybody voting for this (technically correct) answer realizes the problems with arguments.callee: it's disallowed in strict mode and in ES5. –  Pointy Oct 7 '10 at 19:38
    
Voted down, arguments.callee is deprecated in ES5 –  Jaime Rodriguez Sep 14 '11 at 17:35

You could do something like:

(foo = function() { foo(); })()

or in your case:

(recur = function(data){
    data = data+1;
    var nothing = function() {
        if (data > 100) return; // put recursion limit
        recur(data);
    }
    nothing();
})(/* put data init value here */ 0);
share|improve this answer
    
You could do with declaring recur first with a var statement. Dunno whether that breaks the rules of the question, but as you have it now, without the var statement you'll get an error in ECMAScript 5 strict mode. –  Tim Down Oct 7 '10 at 21:00
    
My initial comment included the var keyword, but once I tested this code, it was throwing errors, since you cannot really declare a variable inside of a self-invoking block, and my approach relies on auto declaration of an undefined variable, and therefore @Pointy's solution is more correct. But I still voted for Fabrizio Calderan answer though ;) –  ArtBIT Oct 7 '10 at 23:45
    
Yes, doing (var recur = function() {...})(); won't work since it's now a statement rather than an assignment expression (which returns the value assigned). I was suggesting var recur; (recur = function() {...})(); instead. –  Tim Down Oct 8 '10 at 9:13

It may be simplest to use an "anonymous object" instead:

({
  do: function() {
    console.log("don't run this ...");
    this.do();
  }
}).do();

Your global space is completely unpolluted. It's pretty straightforward. And you can easily take advantage of the object's non-global state.

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When you declare an anonymous function like this:

(function () {
    // Pass
}());

Its considered a function expression and it has an optional name (that you can use to call it from within itself. But because it's a function expression (and not a statement) it stays anonymous (but has a name that you can call). So this function can call itself:

(function foo () {
    foo();
}());
foo //-> undefined
share|improve this answer

Like bobince wrote, simply name your function.

But, I'm guessing you also want to pass in an initial value and stop your function eventually!

var initialValue = ...

(function recurse(data){
    data++;
    var nothing = function() {
        recurse(data);
    }
    if ( ... stop condition ... )
        { ... display result, etc. ... }
    else
        nothing();
}(initialValue));

working jsFiddle example (uses data += data for fun)


share|improve this answer
    
+1, This is a very useful answer and you should get more upvotes for it, but it's not anonymous. –  Incognito Oct 7 '10 at 18:50
    
you clearly didn't read what bobince wrote: However named inline function expressions are also best avoided.. But the OP misses the point too... :) –  galambalazs Oct 7 '10 at 22:09
    
@Galamb - I read it. Disallowed in strict mode and in ES5 is not the same as polluting a parent scope and creating extra instances. –  Peter Ajtai Oct 7 '10 at 23:00

Why not pass the function to the functio itself ?

    var functionCaller = function(thisCaller, data) {
        data = data + 1;
        var nothing = function() {
            thisCaller(thisCaller, data);
        };
        nothing();
    };
    functionCaller(functionCaller, data);
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