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I have a function (called "powersearch", the irony!) that searches for a set of strings across a bunch(~ 5) of fields. The words come in as one string and are separated by spaces.
Some fields can have exact matches, others should have "contains".

(Snipped for brevety)

//Start with all colors
IQueryable<Color> q = db.Colors;
//Filter by powersearch
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchBag.PowerSearchKeys)){
    foreach (string key in searchBag.SplitSearchKeys(searchBag.PowerSearchKeys)
                                    .Where(k=> !string.IsNullOrEmpty(k))){
        //Make a local copy of the var, otherwise it gets overwritten
        string myKey = key;
        int year;
        if (int.TryParse(myKey, out year) && year > 999){
            q = q.Where(c => c.Company.Name.Contains(myKey)
                || c.StockCode.Contains(myKey)                                
                || c.PaintCodes.Any(p => p.Code.Equals(myKey))
                || c.Names.Any(n => n.Label.Contains(myKey))
                || c.Company.CompanyModels.Any(m => m.Model.Name.Contains(myKey))
                || c.UseYears.Any(y => y.Year.Equals(year))
            );
        }
        else{
            q = q.Where(c => c.Company.Name.Contains(myKey)
                || c.StockCode.Contains(myKey)
                || c.PaintCodes.Any(p => p.Code.Contains(myKey))
                || c.Names.Any(n => n.Label.Contains(myKey))                                
                || c.Company.CompanyModels.Any(m => m.Model.Name.Equals(myKey))
            );
        }
    }
}

Because the useYear count is rather large, I tried to check for it as little as possible by outruling all numbers that can never be a number that makes sence in this case. Similar checks are not possible on the other fields since they can pretty much contain any thinkable string.

Currently this query takes about 15 secs for a single, non-year string. That's too much. Anything I can do to improve this?

--Edit--
Profiler shows me the following info for the part where the string is not a year:

exec sp_reset_connection Audit login

exec sp_executesql N'
SELECT COUNT(*) AS [value]
FROM [dbo].[CLR] AS [t0]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[CO] AS [t1] ON [t1].[CO_ID] = [t0].[CO_ID]
WHERE 
	([t1].[LONG_NM] LIKE @p0)
	OR ([t0].[EUR_STK_CD] LIKE @p1)
	OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[PAINT_CD] AS [t2]
		WHERE ([t2].[PAINT_CD] LIKE @p2)
			AND ([t2].[CLR_ID] = [t0].[CLR_ID])
			AND ([t2].[CUSTOM_ID] = [t0].[CUSTOM_ID])
		)
	)OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[CLR_NM] AS [t3]
		WHERE ([t3].[CLR_NM] LIKE @p3)
			AND ([t3].[CLR_ID] = [t0].[CLR_ID])
			AND ([t3].[CUSTOM_ID] = [t0].[CUSTOM_ID])
		)
	) OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[CO_MODL] AS [t4]
		INNER JOIN [dbo].[MODL] AS [t5] ON [t5].[MODL_ID] = [t4].[MODL_ID]
		WHERE ([t5].[MODL_NM] = @p4)
			AND ([t4].[CO_ID] = [t1].[CO_ID])
		)
	)
',N'@p0 varchar(10),@p1 varchar(10),@p2 varchar(10),@p3 varchar(10),@p4 varchar(8)',@p0='%mercedes%',@p1='%mercedes%',@p2='%mercedes%',@p3='%mercedes%',@p4='mercedes'

(took 3626 msecs) Audit Logout (3673 msecs) exec sp_reset_connection (0msecs) Audit login

exec sp_executesql N'
SELECT TOP (30) 
[t0].[CLR_ID] AS [Id],
[t0].[CUSTOM_ID] AS [CustomId],
[t0].[CO_ID] AS [CompanyId], 
[t0].[EUR_STK_CD] AS [StockCode], 
[t0].[SPCL_USE_CD] AS [UseCode], 
[t0].[EFF_IND] AS [EffectIndicator]
FROM [dbo].[CLR] AS [t0]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[CO] AS [t1] ON [t1].[CO_ID] = [t0].[CO_ID]
WHERE 
	([t1].[LONG_NM] LIKE @p0)
	OR ([t0].[EUR_STK_CD] LIKE @p1)
	OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[PAINT_CD] AS [t2]
		WHERE ([t2].[PAINT_CD] LIKE @p2)
			AND ([t2].[CLR_ID] = [t0].[CLR_ID])
			AND ([t2].[CUSTOM_ID] = [t0].[CUSTOM_ID])
		)
	)
	OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[CLR_NM] AS [t3]
		WHERE ([t3].[CLR_NM] LIKE @p3)
			AND ([t3].[CLR_ID] = [t0].[CLR_ID])
			AND ([t3].[CUSTOM_ID] = [t0].[CUSTOM_ID])
		)
	)
	OR (EXISTS(
		SELECT NULL AS [EMPTY]
		FROM [dbo].[CO_MODL] AS [t4]
		INNER JOIN [dbo].[MODL] AS [t5] ON [t5].[MODL_ID] = [t4].[MODL_ID]
		WHERE ([t5].[MODL_NM] = @p4)
			AND ([t4].[CO_ID] = [t1].[CO_ID])
		)
	)'
,N'@p0 varchar(10),@p1 varchar(10),@p2 varchar(10),@p3 varchar(10),@p4 varchar(8)',@p0='%mercedes%',@p1='%mercedes%',@p2='%mercedes%',@p3='%mercedes%',@p4='mercedes'

(took 3368 msecs)

The database structure, sadly, is not under my control. It comes from the US and has to stay in the exact same format for compatibility reasons. Although most of the important fields are indeed indexed, they are indexed in (unnecessary) clustered primary keys. There's verry little I can do about that.

share|improve this question
    
It's NOT linq 2 sql, boris. –  Jon Limjap Dec 23 '08 at 9:59
    
I'm sorry. Don't know how that happened. I meant to alter the title to add a space between linq to sql (it was linqtosql). My mind must have been somewhere else. That said, why are you so resilient in the naming of the title? –  Boris Callens Dec 23 '08 at 10:13
    
Because proper title names give better google results, IMHO, although I acknowledge that "to" is a catchword that might not matter. Maybe it's just the OC in me, sorry. –  Jon Limjap Dec 23 '08 at 10:29
    
No problem. You are probably right it is better for searching. Glad we could resolve this little side issue like sane people without going down the flame path. Also: "OC"? –  Boris Callens Dec 23 '08 at 10:38
    
obsessive compulsive –  uosɐſ May 7 '10 at 0:57

2 Answers 2

Okay, let's break this down - the test case you're interested in first is a single non-year, so all we've got is this:

q = q.Where(c => c.Company.Name.Contains(myKey)
            || c.StockCode.Contains(myKey)
            || c.PaintCodes.Any(p => p.Code.Contains(myKey))
            || c.Names.Any(n => n.Label.Contains(myKey))
            || c.Company.CompanyModels.Any(m => m.Model.Name.Equals(myKey))

Am I right? If so, what does the SQL look like? How long does it take just to execute the SQL statement in SQL Profiler? What does the profiler say the execution plan looks like? Have you got indexes on all of the appropriate columns?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes, I think that is a good starting point. I will update the OP to answer your questions. –  Boris Callens Dec 23 '08 at 9:44

Use compiled queries.

If you don't, you will lose up to 5-10x times performance, as LINQ-to-SQL will have to generate SQL from query every time you call it.

Things become worse when you use non-constants in LINQ-to-SQL as getting their values is really slow.

This assumes that you already have indexes and sane DB schema.

BTW, I am not kidding about 5-10x part.

share|improve this answer
    
My method has about 12 optional fields of which the powersearch keys are only one. I check each field and add another where clause if the field is filled in. Is the compiled query scenario still plausible in this scenario? –  Boris Callens Dec 23 '08 at 10:28

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