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I have the following expression:

user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs => :user_runs).find_by_id(params[:id])

which seems to work fine. But when I add an orders, like this:

user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs => :user_runs).orders("users.names").find_by_id(params[:id])

it breaks with the following error:

ActiveRecord::ConfigurationError: Association named 'user_runs' was not found; perhaps you misspelled it?
app/controllers/clocks_controller.rb:19:in `show'
    test/functional/clocks_controller_test.rb:21:in `__bind_1286475263_942556'

Any ideas why?

The model looks like this:

class Clock < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_and_belongs_to_many :users
  has_many :runs
end

class Run < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :clock
  has_many :user_runs
  has_many :users, :through => :user_runs
end

class UserRun < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :run
  belongs_to :user
end

Continuing with my investigation I've tried this:

ubiquitous_user.clocks.includes(:runs => :user_runs).find_by_id(params[:id])

and I've noticed the queries it's generating doesn't get user_runs at all. Something is odd.

I've created a set of tests to try to figure what was going on:

  context "A graph of users, clocks, runs, etc" do
    setup do
      @users = []
      10.times do
        @users << Factory.create(:user)
      end
      @clocks = []
      10.times do
        @clocks << Factory.create(:clock, :users => @users)
      end
      @clocks.each do |clock|
        10.times do
          run = Factory.create :run, :clock => clock
          @users.each do |user|
            Factory.create :user_run, :run => run, :user => user
          end
        end
      end
      @user = @users.first
      @clock = @clocks.first
    end

    should "find a clock" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users).find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users and runs" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs).find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users, runs and user_runs" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs => :user_runs).find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users order by users.name" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users).order("users.name").find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users and runs order by users.name" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs).order("users.name").find(@clock.id)
    end

    should "find a clock with users, runs and user_runs order by users.name" do
      assert_not_nil @user.clocks.includes(:users, :runs => :user_runs).order("users.name").find(@clock.id)
    end
  end

Every test but the last one pass. Is this not a bug?

share|improve this question

Shouldn't it be

user.clocks.find_by_id(params[:id], :include => [:users, {:runs => :user_runs}])

?

share|improve this answer
    
Not in Rails 3, as far as I know. That's the old Rails 2 style; but it should still work, maybe it does work. I'll give it a try. – Pablo Oct 8 '10 at 4:40
    
With that syntax it seems to work. Thanks for the idea! :) – Pablo Oct 8 '10 at 5:09
    
Actually, it worked in one case but not in another. – Pablo Oct 8 '10 at 11:41

I believe this is a bug, so I reported it here: https://rails.lighthouseapp.com/projects/8994-ruby-on-rails/tickets/5768

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