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I'm creating a function where I need to pass an object so that it can be modified by the function. What is the difference between:

public void myFunction(ref MyClass someClass)

and

public void myFunction(out MyClass someClass)

Which should I use and why?

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10  
You: I need to pass an object so that it can be modified It looks like MyClass would be a class type, i.e. a reference type. In that case, the object you pass can be modified by the myFunction even with no ref/out keyword. myFunction will receive a new reference that points to the same object, and it can modify that same object as much as it wants. The difference the ref keyword would make, would be that myFunction received the same reference to the same object. That would be important only if myFunction were to change the reference to point to another object. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 8 '13 at 13:51
    
I'm puzzled by the amount of confusing answers here, when @AnthonyKolesov's is quite perfect. –  Lohoris Dec 24 '13 at 13:05
    
Declaring an out method is useful when you want a method to return multiple values. One argument can be assigned to null. This enables methods to return values optionally. –  Jeffrey Aug 19 at 2:50

17 Answers 17

up vote 417 down vote accepted

ref tells the compiler that the object is initialized before entering the function, while out tells the compiler that the object will be initialized inside the function.

So while ref is two-ways, out is out-only.

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108  
Another cool thing specific to out is that the function has to assign to the out parameter. It's not allowed to leave it unassigned. –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 23 '08 at 11:30
1  
is 'ref' only applicable to value type? Since reference type is always pass by ref. –  faulty Dec 24 '08 at 9:42
    
Yes. Value types including structs –  Rune Grimstad Dec 31 '08 at 9:54
5  
@faulty: No, ref is not only applicable to value types. ref/out are like pointers in C/C++, they deal with the memory location of the object (indirectly in C#) instead of the direct object. –  thr Mar 15 '10 at 6:53
23  
@faulty: Counterintuitively, Reference types are always passed by value in C#, unless you use the ref specifier. If you set myval=somenewval, the effect is only in that function scope. The ref keyword would allow you to change myval to point to somenewval. –  JasonTrue Apr 14 '10 at 23:21

ref means that value is already set, method can read it and can modify it.

out means that value isn't set and method must set it before return and couldn't read before setting value.

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11  
This answer most clearly and concisely explains the restrictions that the compiler imposes when using the out keyword as opposed to the ref keyword. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Sep 2 '10 at 15:52
2  
From MSDN: A ref parameter must be initialized before use, while an out parameter does not have to be explicitly initialized before being passed and any previous value is ignored. –  Shiva Kumar Aug 20 '13 at 8:33

Cath, Let's say Dom shows up at Peter's cubicle about the memo about the TPS reports.

If Dom were a ref argument, he would have a printed copy of the memo.

If Dom were an out argument, he'd make Peter print a new copy of the memo for him to take with him.

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9  
+1 for creativity. –  longday Aug 12 '10 at 12:25
16  
ref Dom would have written the report in pencil so that Peter could modify it –  Deebster Aug 5 '11 at 9:25
    
@Deebster you know, that metaphor never did anything to you, why must you torture it so? ;) –  Michael Blackburn Aug 8 '11 at 16:09
8  
entertaining yet educating, stackoverflow needs more posts like this –  Bob Sinclar Jun 26 '12 at 16:54

I am going to try my hand at an explanation:

I think we understand how the value types work right? Value types are (int, long, struct etc.). When you send them in to a function without a ref command it COPIES the data. Anything you do to that data in the function only affects the copy, not the original. The ref command sends the ACTUAL data and any changes will affect the data outside the function.

Ok on to the confusing part, reference types:

Lets create a reference type:

List<string> someobject = new List<string>()

When you new up someobject, two parts are created:

  1. The block of memory that holds data for someobject.
  2. A reference (pointer) to that block of data.

Now when you send in someobject into a method without ref it COPIES the reference pointer, NOT the data. So you now have this:

(outside method) reference1 => someobject
(inside method)  reference2 => someobject

Two references pointing to the same object. If you modify a property on someobject using reference2 it will affect the same data pointed to by reference1.

 (inside method)  reference2.Add("SomeString");
 (outside method) reference1[0] == "SomeString"   //this is true

If you null out reference2 or point it to new data it will not affect reference1 nor the data reference1 points to.

(inside method) reference2 = new List<string>();
(outside method) reference1 != null; reference1[0] == "SomeString" //this is true

The references are now pointing like this:
reference2 => new List<string>()
reference1 => someobject

Now what happens when you send someobject by ref to a method? The actual reference to someobject gets sent to the method. So you now have only one reference to the data:

(outside method) reference1 => someobject;
(inside method)  reference1 => someobject;

But what does this mean? It acts exactly the same as sending someobject not by ref except for two main thing:

1) When you null out the reference inside the method it will null the one outside the method.

 (inside method)  reference1 = null;
 (outside method) reference1 == null;  //true

2) You can now point the reference to a completely different data location and the reference outside the function will now point to the new data location.

 (inside method)  reference1 = new List<string>();
 (outside method) reference1.Count == 0; //this is true
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1  
Really appreciate the explanation and examples! –  WhatIsHeDoing Feb 17 at 14:27

ref is in and out.

You should use out in preference wherever it suffices for your requirements.

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not quite, as the accepted answer ref if directional and useless ignoring value-types if not passed back out. –  kenny Mar 27 '10 at 13:17
    
@kenny: Can you clarify a bit please - i.e., which words would you change to maintain the spirit of the answer but remove the inacuracy you percieve? My answer is not a crazy guess from a newbie, but the haste (terseness, typos) in your comment seems to assume it is. The aim is to provide a way of thinking about the difference with the least number of words. –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 27 '10 at 13:46
    
(BTW I'm familiar with value types, reference types, passing by reference, passing by value, COM and C++ should you find it useful to make reference to those concepts in your clarification) –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 27 '10 at 14:17
1  
Object references are passed by value (except when using the "ref" or "out" keyword). Think of objects as ID numbers. If a class variable holds "Object #1943" and one passes that variable by value to a routine, that routine can make changes to Object #1943, but it can't make the variable point to anything other than "Object #1943". If the variable was passed by reference, the routine could make the variable point hold "Object #5441". –  supercat Jan 15 '12 at 18:40
1  
@supercat: I do like your explanation of ref vs val (and this followup anaology). I think kenny doesnt actually need any of this explained to him, (relatively) confusing as his comments were. I do wish we could all just remove these goddam comments though as they're just confusing everyone. The root cause of all this nonsense appears to be that kenny misread my answer and has yet to point out a single word that should be added/removed/replaced. None of the three of us have learned anything from the discussion we didnt already know and the other answer has a ludicrous number of upvotes. –  Ruben Bartelink Jan 15 '12 at 23:20

Extending the Dog, Cat example. The second method with ref changes the object referenced by the caller. Hence "Cat" !!!

    public static void Foo()
    {
        MyClass myObject = new MyClass();
        myObject.Name = "Dog";
        Bar(myObject);
        Console.WriteLine(myObject.Name); // Writes "Dog". 
        Bar(ref myObject);
        Console.WriteLine(myObject.Name); // Writes "Cat". 
    }

    public static void Bar(MyClass someObject)
    {
        MyClass myTempObject = new MyClass();
        myTempObject.Name = "Cat";
        someObject = myTempObject;
    }

    public static void Bar(ref MyClass someObject)
    {
        MyClass myTempObject = new MyClass();
        myTempObject.Name = "Cat";
        someObject = myTempObject;
    }
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Since you're passing in a reference type (a class) there is no need use ref because per default only a reference to the actual object is passed and therefore you always change the object behind the reference.

Example:

public void Foo()
{
    MyClass myObject = new MyClass();
    myObject.Name = "Dog";
    Bar(myObject);
    Console.WriteLine(myObject.Name); // Writes "Cat".
}

public void Bar(MyClass someObject)
{
    someObject.Name = "Cat";
}

As long you pass in a class you don't have to use ref if you want to change the object inside your method.

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4  
This works only if no new object is created and returned. When a new object is created, the reference to the old object would be lost. –  etsuba Dec 23 '08 at 15:41
5  
This is wrong - try the following: add someObject = null to Bar end execute. Your code will run fine as only Bar's reference to the instance was nulled. Now change Bar to Bar(ref MyClass someObject) and execute again - you'll get a NullReferenceException because Foo's reference to the instance has been nulled too. –  Keith Sep 27 '10 at 7:55

"Baker"

That's because the first one changes your string-reference to point to "Baker". Changing the reference is possible because you passed it via the ref keyword (=> a reference to a reference to a string). The Second call gets a copy of the reference to the string.

string looks some kind of special at first. But string is just a reference class and if you define

string s = "Able";

then s is a reference to a string class that contains the text "Able"! Another assignment to the same variable via

s = "Baker";

does not change the original string but just creates a new instance and let s point to that instance!

You can try it with the following little code example:

string s = "Able";
string s2 = s;
s = "Baker";
Console.WriteLine(s2);

What do you expect? What you will get is still "Able" because you just set the reference in s to another instance while s2 points to the original instance.

EDIT: string is also immutable which means there is simply no method or property that modifies an existing string instance (you can try to find one in the docs but you won't fins any :-) ). All string manipulation methods return a new string instance! (That's why you often get a better performance when using the StringBuilder class)

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1  
Exactly. So it's not strictly true to say "Since you're passing in a reference type (a class) there is no need use ref". –  Paul Mitchell Dec 23 '08 at 13:43
    
In theory it is right to say so because he wrote "so that it can be modified" which isn't possible on strings. But because of immutable objects "ref" and "out" are very useful also for reference types! (.Net contains a lot of immutable classes!) –  Rüdiger Stevens Dec 23 '08 at 13:49
    
Yes, you're right. I didn't think of immutable objects like strings because most object are mutable. –  Albic Dec 23 '08 at 16:55

@Albic. if the ref is superfluous for a reference type, what do you think this code will output?

using System;

namespace DeleteMe
{

    class Class1
    {
    	private static void WithRef( ref string s )
    	{
    		s = "Baker";
    	}

    	private static void WithoutRef( string s )
    	{
    		s = "Charlie";
    	}

    	[STAThread]
    	static void Main(string[] args)
    	{
    		string s = "Able";

    		WithRef( ref s );
    		WithoutRef( s );

    		Console.WriteLine( s );
    	}
    }
}
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They're pretty much the same - the only difference is that a variable you pass as an out parameter doesn't need to be initialised, and the method using the ref parameter has to set it to something.

int x;    Foo(out x); // OK 
int y;    Foo(ref y); // Error

Ref parameters are for data that might be modified, out parameters are for data that's an additional output for the function (eg int.TryParse) that are already using the return value for something.

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ref and out behave similarly except following differences.

  • ref variable must be initialized before use. out variable can be used without assignment
  • out parameter must be treated as an unassigned value by the function that uses it. So, we can use initialized out parameter in the calling code, but the value will be lost when the function executes.
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Out: A return statement can be used for returning only one value from a function. However, using output parameters, you can return two values from a function. Output parameters are like reference parameters, except that they transfer data out of the method rather than into it.

The following example illustrates this:

using System;

namespace CalculatorApplication
{
   class NumberManipulator
   {
      public void getValue(out int x )
      {
         int temp = 5;
         x = temp;
      }

      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         NumberManipulator n = new NumberManipulator();
         /* local variable definition */
         int a = 100;

         Console.WriteLine("Before method call, value of a : {0}", a);

         /* calling a function to get the value */
         n.getValue(out a);

         Console.WriteLine("After method call, value of a : {0}", a);
         Console.ReadLine();

      }
   }
}

ref: A reference parameter is a reference to a memory location of a variable. When you pass parameters by reference, unlike value parameters, a new storage location is not created for these parameters. The reference parameters represent the same memory location as the actual parameters that are supplied to the method.

In C#, you declare the reference parameters using the ref keyword. The following example demonstrates this:

using System;
namespace CalculatorApplication
{
   class NumberManipulator
   {
      public void swap(ref int x, ref int y)
      {
         int temp;

         temp = x; /* save the value of x */
         x = y;   /* put y into x */
         y = temp; /* put temp into y */
       }

      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         NumberManipulator n = new NumberManipulator();
         /* local variable definition */
         int a = 100;
         int b = 200;

         Console.WriteLine("Before swap, value of a : {0}", a);
         Console.WriteLine("Before swap, value of b : {0}", b);

         /* calling a function to swap the values */
         n.swap(ref a, ref b);

         Console.WriteLine("After swap, value of a : {0}", a);
         Console.WriteLine("After swap, value of b : {0}", b);

         Console.ReadLine();

      }
   }
}
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Mind well that the reference parameter which is passed inside the function is directly worked on . eg

    public class MyClass
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
    public void Foo()
    {
        MyClass myObject = new MyClass();
        myObject.Name = "Dog";
        Bar(myObject);
        Console.WriteLine(myObject.Name); // Writes "Dog".
    }

    public void Bar(MyClass someObject)
    {
        MyClass myTempObject = new MyClass();
        myTempObject.Name = "Cat";
        someObject = myTempObject;
    }

This will write Dog not Cat hence you should directly work on someObject.

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1  
While everything here is pretty much true it doesn't really explain the difference between by value by reference or out. At best it half explains the difference between reference and value/immutable types. –  Conrad Frix Dec 25 '12 at 4:10

Below I have shown an example using both Ref and out. Now, you all will be cleared about ref and out.

In below mentioned example when i comment //myRefObj = new myClass { Name = "ref outside called!! " }; line, will get an error saying "Use of unassigned local variable 'myRefObj'", but there is no such error in out.

Where to use Ref: when we are calling a procedure with an in parameter and the same parameter will be used to store the output of that proc.

Where to use Out: when we are calling a procedure with no in parameter and teh same param will be used to return the value from that proc. Also note the output

public partial class refAndOutUse : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myClass myRefObj;
        myRefObj = new myClass { Name = "ref outside called!!  <br/>" };
        myRefFunction(ref myRefObj);
        Response.Write(myRefObj.Name); //ref inside function

        myClass myOutObj;
        myOutFunction(out myOutObj);
        Response.Write(myOutObj.Name); //out inside function
    }

    void myRefFunction(ref myClass refObj)
    {
        refObj.Name = "ref inside function <br/>";
        Response.Write(refObj.Name); //ref inside function
    }
    void myOutFunction(out myClass outObj)
    {
        outObj = new myClass { Name = "out inside function <br/>" }; 
        Response.Write(outObj.Name); //out inside function
    }
}

public class myClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
} 
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 public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //int a=10;
        //change(ref a);
        //Console.WriteLine(a);
        // Console.Read();

        int b;
        change2(out b);
        Console.WriteLine(b);
        Console.Read();
    }
    // static void change(ref int a)
    //{
    //    a = 20;
    //}

     static void change2(out int b)
     {
         b = 20;
     }

you can check this code it will describe you its complete differnce when you use "ref" its mean that u already initialize that int/string

but when you use "out" it works in both conditions wheather u initialize that int/string or not but u must initialize that int/string in that function

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ref means that the value in the ref parameter is already set, the method can read and modify it. Using the ref keyword is the same as saying that the caller is responsible for initializing the value of the parameter.


out tells the compiler that the initialization of object is the responsibility of the function, the function has to assign to the out parameter. It's not allowed to leave it unassigned.

Read here.

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I may not be so good at this, but surely strings (even though they are technically reference types and live on the heap) are passed by value, not reference?

        string a = "Hello";

        string b = "goodbye";

        b = a; //attempt to make b point to a, won't work.

        a = "testing";

        Console.WriteLine(b); //this will produce "hello", NOT "testing"!!!!

This why you need ref if you want changes to exist outside of the scope of the function making them, you aren't passing a reference otherwise.

As far as I am aware you only need ref for structs/value types and string itself, as string is a reference type that pretends it is but is not a value type.

I could be completely wrong here though, I am new.

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3  
Welcome to Stack Overflow, Edwin. Strings are passed by reference, just like any other object, as far as I know. You may be confused because strings are immutable objects, so it's not as obvious that they are passed by reference. Imagine that string had a method called Capitalize() that would change the contents of the string to capital letters. If you then replaced your line a = "testing"; with a.Capitalize();, then your output would be "HELLO", not "Hello". One of the advantages of immutable types is that you can pass around references and not worry about other code changing the value. –  Don Kirkby Dec 8 '11 at 19:42
1  
There are three fundamental types of semantics a type can expose: mutable reference semantics, mutable value semantics, and immutable semantics. Consider variables x and y of a type T, which has field or property m, and assume x is copied to y. If T has reference semantics, changes to x.m will be observed by y.m. If T has value semantics, one can change x.m without affecting y.m. If T has immutable semantics, neither x.m nor y.m will ever change. Immutable semantics can be simulated by either reference or value objects. Strings are immutable reference objects. –  supercat Jan 15 '12 at 18:37

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