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There is a way to use a calculated field in the where clause ?

I want to do something like

SELECT a, b, a+b as TOTAL FROM (
   select 7 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL
   UNION ALL
   select 8 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL
   UNION ALL
   select 0 as a, 0 as b FROM DUAL
)
WHERE TOTAL <> 0
;

but I get ORA-00904: "TOTAL": invalid identifier.

So I have to use

SELECT a, b, a+b as TOTAL FROM (
   select 7 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL
   UNION ALL
   select 8 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL
   UNION ALL
   select 0 as a, 0 as b FROM DUAL
)
WHERE a+b <> 0
;
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Logically, the select clause is one of the last parts of a query evaluated, so the aliases and derived columns are not available. (Except to order by, which logically happens last.)

Using a derived table is away around this:

select * 
from (SELECT a, b, a+b as TOTAL FROM ( 
           select 7 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL 
           UNION ALL 
           select 8 as a, 8 as b FROM DUAL 
           UNION ALL 
           select 0 as a, 0 as b FROM DUAL) 
    )
WHERE TOTAL <> 0 
; 
share|improve this answer
    
Could also use a CTE. –  onedaywhen Nov 10 '10 at 9:44
    
I was trying this in a Stored Procedure and the above syntax would not work unless I aliased the derived table as well. –  DilbertDave Mar 9 '12 at 15:00
    
@DilbertDave, interesting. Were you trying in Oracle? If I remember correctly, SQL Server always required derived tables to be aliased. –  Shannon Severance Mar 9 '12 at 15:32
1  
OP was asking about Oracle which doesn't need the alias. I'm glad this answer was able to help you even though it was for a different platform. –  Shannon Severance Mar 9 '12 at 19:07
1  
Ah - just noticed the Oracle error message and tags blush. Still, it pointed me in the right direction so upvote :-) –  DilbertDave Mar 14 '12 at 8:53

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