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Writing a stored procedure in MS SQL Server 2008 R2, I want to avoid using DSQL...

I would like the sort method (ASC or DESC) to be conditional.

Now, with a numeric column I would simply use a case statement and negate the value to emulate ASC or DESC... That is:

... ORDER BY CASE @OrderAscOrDesc WHEN 0 THEN [NumericColumn] ELSE -[NumericColumn] END ASC

What is an appropriate method for doing this with an alpha column?

EDIT: I thought of a clever way but it seems terribly inefficient... I could insert my ordered alpha column into a temp table with an autonumber then sort by the autonumber using the method described above.

EDIT2:

What do you guys think of this approach?

ORDER BY CASE @OrderAscOrDesc WHEN 0 THEN [AlphaColumn] ELSE '' END ASC,
CASE @OrderAscOrDesc WHEN 0 THEN '' ELSE [AlphaColumn] END DESC

I don't know if forcing a sort on a uniform column is more efficient than deriving numbers from sorted strings though

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

One option

;WITH cQuery AS
(
   SELECT
       *,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY SortColumn) AS RowNum
   FROM
       MyTable
)
SELECT
   *
FROM
   cQuery
ORDER BY
   RowNum * @Direction --1 = ASC or -1 = DESC

Or CASE which IMHO is a bit uglier

ORDER BY
  CASE WHEN 'ASC' THEN SortColumn ELSE '' END ASC,
  CASE WHEN 'DESC' THEN SortColumn ELSE '' END DESC
share|improve this answer
    
clever, pretty similar to my solution I posted in the edit. I'm hoping for something more efficient than deriving another sorted copy of the data just to produce a numeric sort order.... –  Matthew Oct 7 '10 at 19:00
    
@Matthew PK: you either have to substitute the string for a matching number, or add dummy sorts for non.relevant cases. Nothing really clever I'm afraid –  gbn Oct 7 '10 at 19:04
    
What do you think about the "two ORDER BY clauses" approach in my second edit? –  Matthew Oct 7 '10 at 19:32
    
lol @ your edit :D We are thinking on the same wavelength here –  Matthew Oct 7 '10 at 19:33
    
The multiply by direction was exactly what I needed... I've got a whole host of different sort criteria pre-stored, and adding a +1/-1 direction to each record and multiplying them in the order clause turned out to be very clean. –  Chris Nash Nov 21 '11 at 20:25

This is one of those cases when specific solutions may be preferable preferable to generic ones, especially when we deal with large amounts of data. I would:

IF @OrderAscOrDesc = 0 THEN BEGIN
  SELECT ...
  FROM  ... 
  ORDER BY [AlphaColumn] ASC
END ELSE BEGIN
  SELECT ...
  FROM  ... 
  ORDER BY [AlphaColumn] DESC
END

If you have an index on [AlphaColumn], you might sometimes get a better plan with a more specific query, than with a generic one-size-fits-all one.

Edit: to facilitate code reuse, you can wrap your select in an inline UDF - it will perform just as well:

IF @OrderAscOrDesc = 0 THEN BEGIN
  SELECT ...
  FROM  YourInlineUdf(...)
  ORDER BY [AlphaColumn] ASC
END ELSE BEGIN
  SELECT ...
  FROM  YourInlineUdf(...) 
  ORDER BY [AlphaColumn] DESC
END
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with the principle you've set forth. In my particular application I would prefer not to do this because the query is relatively long and uses a number of joins. My concern would be code duplicated 6 times or so making maintenance and future updates difficult. –  Matthew Oct 7 '10 at 21:00
    
@Matthew PK: to facilitate code reuse, you can wrap your select in an inline UDF - it will perform just as well –  A-K Oct 7 '10 at 21:35

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