Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I attempted to use a SeekBar for the first time, and I was disappointed with the results. I have an app that needs to use a slider to cover 80 spots. I want the user to be able to move in .5 increments (i.e. 10.5, 11.0). My max range is 40, which is why I doubled it to 80 to account for the decimals.

Everything worked, but when I put it on my Droid, the performance was terrible in my opinion. When trying to stop on 21.5, the slider usually stopped at 22.0 or 22.5, and I had to take extra time to try and inch it over. Other times I would try to select the slider and it was unresponsive. I'm not as concerned about the unresponsiveness, but I can not put the SeekBar in my app if it requires the user to have exact precision to hit a certain spot.

Is there anything that I can do to adjust the SeekBar so that it is easy to hit the number you are trying to land on without difficulty? I'm not sure if the problem is occurring because my SeekBar contains a large amount of possible values, and with screen size limited this forces the numbers to be smashed closer together? Or if this is just the way it behaves in general.

If there isn't a good way to adjust the sensitivity, is there a good alternative that I can use that provides similar functionality?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if the problem is occurring because my SeekBar contains a large amount of possible values, and with screen size limited this forces the numbers to be smashed closer together?

Pretty much this. One thing you could do is add a small plus and minus button beside the seekbar, which increment and decrement the value by 0.5. This way you could still use the seekbar for general cases, and refine your selection with the buttons if needed. Maybe not the most elegant solution, but it would certainly work.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good idea, I may have to try that. Thanks kcoppock –  Michael Oct 7 '10 at 20:16
    
You're welcome. That's one of the things that's always bugged me about touchscreens is the lack of accuracy for things like that. I <3 me some fine-tuning options. :D –  kcoppock Oct 7 '10 at 20:20

I have the exact same problem and came up with my own way of reducing the sensitivity. The problem for me happens when I am leaving the slider and it unintentionally gets repositioned, because of thickness of fingers etc. So I wrote a timer to see if the position was selected for a while and snap to this position while leaving the seekbar. This method is a bit clumsy but this is the best I can think of, given I do not want +/- buttons as suggested above. It works well for my needs. Here is the code for anyone interested:

seekBar.setOnSeekBarChangeListener(new OnSeekBarChangeListener() {
            int lastProgress = 0;
            Timer endTimer = null;
            boolean timerExpired = false;

            class SeekBarTimerTask extends TimerTask {
                public void run() {
                    timerExpired = true;
                }
            }

            public void onProgressChanged(SeekBar seekBar, int progress, boolean fromUser) {
                if(timerExpired == false) {
                    // clean up the previous timer and start a new one
                    setTimer();
                }
                else {
                    // if the timer has expired, do not honor small variations of 2%
                    if(Math.abs(progress - lastProgress) <= seekBar.getMax() * 0.02) {
                        seekBar.setProgress(lastProgress);
                        return;
                    }
                    else {
                        // The variation is not small. This means that the seekbar position change
                        // was intentional. Honor it and schedule the timer again.
                        setTimer();
                    }
                }

                lastProgress = progress;
            }

            public void onStartTrackingTouch (SeekBar seekBar) {}
            public void onStopTrackingTouch (SeekBar seekBar) {
                timerExpired = false;
                endTimer.cancel();
                endTimer.purge();
            }

            private void setTimer() {
                if(endTimer != null) {
                    endTimer.cancel();
                    endTimer.purge();
                }

                timerExpired = false;
                endTimer = new Timer();
                endTimer.schedule(new SeekBarTimerTask(), 300);
            }
        });
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.