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How do you do LIMIT in DB2 for iSeries?

I have a table with more than 50,000 records and I want to return records 0 to 10,000, and records 10,000 to 20,000.

I know in SQL you write LIMIT 0,10000 at the end of the query for 0 to 10,000 and LIMIT 10000,10000 at the end of the query for 10000 to 20,000

So, how is this done in DB2? Whats the code and syntax? (full query example is appreciated)

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ROW_NUMBER() was only implemented in iSeries DB2 V5R4. For previous versions try using RRN() which is similar. –  Paul Morgan Oct 11 '10 at 2:25
    
RRN() is completely different than row_number(). –  Brandon Peterson Oct 11 '10 at 14:33
    
did not work for me. Sytanx error. –  elcool Oct 11 '10 at 15:31
1  
Try RRN(filename) which will give the physical relative record number of the row. RRN won't be sequential and can skip numbers if rows have been deleted. RRN also won't be sequential by key but will be sequential based on addition if no deletes have occured. In any case RRN will be unique for a row and can be used to select subsets of the table. –  Paul Morgan Oct 11 '10 at 22:56
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6 Answers

Using FETCH FIRST [n] ROWS ONLY:

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/dzichelp/v2r2/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.db29.doc.perf/db2z_fetchfirstnrows.htm

SELECT LASTNAME, FIRSTNAME, EMPNO, SALARY
  FROM EMP
  ORDER BY SALARY DESC
  FETCH FIRST 20 ROWS ONLY;

To get ranges, you'd have to use ROW_NUMBER() (since v5r4) and use that within the WHERE clause: (stolen from here: http://www.justskins.com/forums/db2-select-how-to-123209.html)

SELECT code, name, address
FROM ( 
  SELECT row_number() OVER ( ORDER BY code ) AS rid, code, name, address
  FROM contacts
  WHERE name LIKE '%Bob%' 
  ) AS t
WHERE t.rid BETWEEN 20 AND 25;
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yeah, I found this too, hehe. I was editing the question at the same time to indicate that I want middle rows too. –  elcool Oct 7 '10 at 19:34
2  
You have to do something like this with ROW_NUMBER: justskins.com/forums/db2-select-how-to-123209.html –  Joe Oct 7 '10 at 19:38
    
ROW_NUMBER is not a valid keyword. But thx for the link, it gave me an idea and it works. –  elcool Oct 7 '10 at 19:59
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Developed this method:

You NEED a table that has an unique value that can be ordered.

If you want rows 10,000 to 25,000 and your Table has 40,000 rows, first you need to get the starting point and total rows:

int start = 40000 - 10000;

int total = 25000 - 10000;

And then pass these by code to the query:

SELECT * FROM 
(SELECT * FROM schema.mytable 
ORDER BY userId DESC fetch first {start} rows only ) AS mini 
ORDER BY mini.userId ASC fetch first {total} rows only
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Note that 10000th row is escluded from the resultset, first row is the 10001st. –  bluish Jun 5 '12 at 7:56
    
@elcool Why is your start 40000-10000 and not just 10000? –  Kraken Aug 24 '12 at 5:57
1  
Interesting solution. I was going to use it for compatibility with H2 test database... But, sadly, it works ~30 times slower than SELECT row_number() OVER ( ORDER BY code ) approach. –  manuna Sep 5 '13 at 12:40
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You should also consider the OPTIMIZE FOR n ROWS clause. More details on all of this in the DB2 LUW documentation in the Guidelines for restricting SELECT statements topic:

  • The OPTIMIZE FOR clause declares the intent to retrieve only a subset of the result or to give priority to retrieving only the first few rows. The optimizer can then choose access plans that minimize the response time for retrieving the first few rows.
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@elcool's solution is a smart idea, but you need to know total number of rows (which can even change while you are executing the query!). So I propose a modified version, which unfortunately needs 3 subqueries instead of 2:

select * from (
    select * from (
        select * from MYLIB.MYTABLE
        order by MYID asc 
        fetch first {last} rows only 
        ) I 
    order by MYID desc
    fetch first {length} rows only
    ) II
order by MYID asc

where {last} should be replaced with row number of the last record I need and {length} should be replaced with the number of rows I need, calculated as last row - first row + 1.

E.g. if I want rows from 10 to 25 (totally 16 rows), {last} will be 25 and {length} will be 25-10+1=16.

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There are 2 solutions to paginate efficiently on a DB2 table :

1 - the technique using the function row_number() and the clause OVER which has been presented on another post ("SELECT row_number() OVER ( ORDER BY ... )"). On some big tables, I noticed sometimes a degradation of performances.

2 - the technique using a scrollable cursor. The implementation depends of the language used. That technique seems more robust on big tables.

I presented the 2 techniques implemented in PHP during a seminar next year. The slide is available on this link : http://gregphplab.com/serendipity/uploads/slides/DB2_PHP_Best_practices.pdf

Sorry but this document is only in french.

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Here's the solution I came up with:

select FIELD from TABLE where FIELD > LASTVAL order by FIELD fetch first N rows only;

By initializing LASTVAL to 0 (or '' for a text field), then setting it to the last value in the most recent set of records, this will step through the table in chunks of N records.

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(I initially thought you were setting the value in the table, which would be spectacularly problematic on a concurrent system) Yes, this should work in cases where you're doing a sequential read through the table, although you'd need some sort of tie-breaker column in the case where N is smaller than the number of identical values in the column (although this is true when using ROW_NUMBER() too). Initial values must also be chosen with care - 0 will obviously be problematic if the column contains a negative value. Care would be needed with nulls. Won't work if pages skipped. –  Clockwork-Muse Feb 12 at 10:13
    
Thanks for the comment. I think there's an implicit assumption that the field we're using to control the query is unique and monotonically increasing. I agree that if those assumptions don't hold, this won't work to visit all the records in the table. And, of course, you're correct that you'd have to start with a LASTVAL that makes sense. In general, I think you'd want to start with whatever is returned by "select MINIMUM(FIELD) from TABLE". If the field is indexed, most db engines will do better than reading the whole table sequentially. –  Tom Barron Feb 13 at 21:41
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