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how to find if a number is float or integer?

1.25 --> float  
1 --> integer  
0 --> integer  
0.25 --> float
share|improve this question
26  
I understand what you're asking here, but just to be clear: <nit-pick> JavaScript does not have different integer and float numeric types. Every number in JavaScript is just a Number. </nit-pick> –  Matt Ball Oct 7 '10 at 21:01
2  
0.25 is an integer? –  Task Jul 26 '11 at 13:38
    
let me correct it! thx –  coure2011 Jul 31 '11 at 5:42
1  
Is Infinityan integer or a non-integer value as far as you're concerned? The answers here are pretty evenly distributed on this score. –  Mike Samuel Mar 13 '12 at 7:07
5  
@MikeSamuel To be mathematically accurate: since infinity is not a real number and all integers are real numbers, Infinity cannot be considered an integer. –  rvighne Feb 15 at 18:54

30 Answers 30

up vote 456 down vote accepted

check for a remainder when dividing by 1:

function isInt(n) {
   return n % 1 === 0;
}

If you don't know that the argument is a number-

function isInt(n){
    return typeof n== "number" && isFinite(n) && n%1===0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
simple n efficient solution. –  coure2011 Oct 8 '10 at 14:06
25  
Careful, this will also return true for an empty string, a string representing an integral number, true, false, null, an empty array, an array containing a single integral number, an array containing a string representing an integral number, and maybe more. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 8 '10 at 16:53
3  
Just to note, this method will work in most cases, but its not enough to assume that the converse (!isInt) implies a float. Try it against a very large number - !isInt(Number.MAX_VALUE-0.1)- it won't work. This is due to the use of modulo. The methods in the answer below this will work in all cases. –  VLostBoy Mar 5 '12 at 13:22
3  
Nice trick but not the correct answer as it fails to check empty string "" and 1.0 isInt(""); && isInt(1.0); both result in true see this demo jsbin.com/elohuq/1/edit –  Champ Oct 4 '12 at 9:43
4  
Ina, the use of === is encouraged over == in general, because it leads to more type safety and more predictable, uniform behaviour. As previous answerers have stated, this answer is absolutely, 100% incorrect. The values null, empty string, 1.0 and numerous others will all register incorrectly as integers (even with the === check). –  whoblitz Sep 11 '13 at 2:59

Try these functions to test whether a value is a number primitive value that has no fractional part and is within the size limits of what can be represented as an exact integer.

function isFloat(n) {
    return n === +n && n !== (n|0);
}

function isInteger(n) {
    return n === +n && n === (n|0);
}
share|improve this answer
4  
heh awesom exploit, it's pretty much mine (n===+n to check for numeric, n|0 to round), but with built-in operators. funky –  Claudiu Oct 7 '10 at 21:11
4  
@John Hartsock a string is never going to be a numeric value. It's a string. The point of this function is to test whether a value is a Javascript numeric value that has no fractional part and is within the size limits of what can be represented as an exact integer. If you want to check a string to see if it contains a sequence of characters that represent a number, you'd call parseFloat() first. –  Pointy Oct 7 '10 at 21:23
3  
@John Hartsock: it won't return true unless a number primitive was passed. I think that makes sense given the names of the functions. Anything else should be a candidate for isString, isBoolean, etc. if such functions are being written. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 8 '10 at 2:43
3  
@Pointy: double precision floats can represent integer values exactly up to 2^53. So it depends if the OP was asking about integer in the maths sense (whole numbers) or in the 32-bit data sense. If it's the latter, your solution is perfect. –  Dave Feb 18 '12 at 1:26
2  
+1 for using n|0 to convert the value to a signed 32-bit integer. As @Dave says, the integers between 2^31 and 2^53 are interesting in JavaScript, because they can be represented exactly, but get truncated to their least-significant 32 bits by the bitwise operators. –  TachyonVortex Jul 19 '13 at 2:53

Why not something like this:

var isInt = function(n) { return parseInt(n) === n };
share|improve this answer
    
This is actually the core of a good solution for me. I needed to allow positive integers and disallow floats, strings and negative integers. –  Imran-UK Jul 9 '13 at 16:48
    
This seems like a vastly better solution than the others in this thread. Could the community offer some criticism, perhaps? –  exizt May 5 at 18:06
1  
var y = 1.00; y === parseInt(y, 10); // this returns true for me, which is not really what we want. –  whoughton May 31 at 19:11

Here are efficient functions that check if the value is a number or can be safely converted to a number:

function isNumber(value) {
    if ((undefined === value) || (null === value)) {
        return false;
    }
    if (typeof value == 'number') {
        return true;
    }
    return !isNaN(value - 0);
}

And for integers (would return false if the value is a float):

function isInteger(value) {
    if ((undefined === value) || (null === value)) {
        return false;
    }
    return value % 1 == 0;
}

The efficiency here is that parseInt (or parseNumber) are avoided when the value already is a number. Both parsing functions always convert to string first and then attempt to parse that string, which would be a waste if the value already is a number.

Thank you to the other posts here for providing further ideas for optimization!

share|improve this answer
1  
This function fails on the empty string: isNumber('') is true. –  user1200039 Apr 16 '13 at 14:56

You can use a simple regular expression:

function isInt(value)
{
    var er = /^-?[0-9]+$/;

    return er.test(value);
}

Or you can use the below functions too, according your needs. They are developed by the PHPJS Project.

is_int() => Check if the variable type is Integer and if its content is Integer

is_float() => Check if the variable type is Float and if its content is Integer

ctype_digit() => Check if the variable type is String and if its content has only decimal digits

Update 1

Now it checks negative numbers too, thanks for @ChrisBartley comment!

share|improve this answer
1  
This one works in google docs scripts –  Codler Jul 26 '13 at 16:14
    
Perfect to test simple unsigned integers. –  tothemario Feb 16 at 20:25
3  
One liner: /^[0-9]+$/.test(String(value)) –  tothemario Feb 16 at 21:14
    
Shorter and slightly less readable one-liner: /^[0-9]+$/.test(''+value) –  distilledchaos Apr 18 at 20:59
1  
Doesn't handle negative integers. You don't need the ternary operator either since test() returns a boolean. This should do it: return /^-?\d+$/.test(String(value)); –  Chris Bartley Apr 24 at 13:57
function isInt(n) 
{
    return n != "" && !isNaN(n) && Math.round(n) == n;
}
function isFloat(n){
    return n != "" && !isNaN(n) && Math.round(n) != n;
}

works for all cases.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 This is good. isInt('1') returns true as expected (at least for me). Weird enough, though, this returns true to isInt([5]) as well. Didn't matter for me, but may for you, so, take care. –  acdcjunior Jul 3 '13 at 14:07
!!(24%1) // false
!!(24.2%1) // true
share|improve this answer

As others mentioned, you only have doubles in JS. So how do you define a number being an integer? Just check if the rounded number is equal to itself:

function isInteger(f) {
    return typeof(f)==="number" && Math.round(f) == f;
}
function isFloat(f) { return typeof(f)==="number" && !isInteger(f); }
share|improve this answer
3  
Might want to check that the value is numeric... isFloat('abc') returns true –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 7 '10 at 21:11
    
ah yes good point –  Claudiu Oct 7 '10 at 21:12
    
isFloat(NaN) // true –  shime May 7 at 22:07
    
@shime: Good catch. NaN is technically a floating point number though... depends what the use case is I suppose. –  Claudiu May 7 at 22:27

It really depends on what you want to achieve. If you want to "emulate" strongly typed languages then I suggest you not trying. As others mentioned all numbers have the same representation (the same type).

Using something like Claudiu provided:

isInteger( 1.0 ) -> true

which looks fine for common sense, but in something like C you would get false

share|improve this answer

Here's what I use for integers:

Math.ceil(parseFloat(val)) === val

Short, nice :) Works all the time. This is what David Flanagan suggests if I'm not mistaken.

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var isInt = function (n) { return n === (n | 0); };

Haven't had a case where this didn't do the job.

share|improve this answer
    
hey sorry why this returns false? console.log(isInt(7932938942839482938)); –  sbaaaang Feb 8 at 16:33
1  
Because that's exceeding MaxInt. –  ankr Feb 10 at 11:23
    
but you can set an Int max length nope? what if i dunno the int length is returned? –  sbaaaang Feb 10 at 11:38
    
I'm not sure what you are asking, but you can read more about numbers here ecma262-5.com/ELS5_HTML.htm#Section_8.5. For handling big ints you could look into a library like github.com/jtobey/javascript-bignum –  ankr Feb 10 at 12:55
2  
+1, best answer here. –  Dagg Nabbit May 1 at 2:01

There is a method called Number.isInteger() which is currently implemented only in latest Firefox and is still a part of EcmaScript 6 proposal. However MDN provides a polyfill for the other browsers, which matches the one specified in ECMA harmony:

if (!Number.isInteger) {
  Number.isInteger = function isInteger (nVal) {
    return typeof nVal === "number" && isFinite(nVal) && nVal > -9007199254740992 && nVal < 9007199254740992 && Math.floor(nVal) === nVal;
  };
}
share|improve this answer

It's simple as:

if( n === parseInt(n) ) ...

Try this in console:

x=1;
x===parseInt(x); // true
x="1";
x===parseInt(x); // false
x=1.1;
x===parseInt(x); // false, obviously

// BUT!

x=1.0;
x===parseInt(x); // true, because 1.0 is NOT a float!

This confuses a lot of people. Whenever something is .0, it's not a float anymore. It's an integer. Or you can just call it "a numeric thing" for there is no strict distinction like back then in C. Good old times.

So basically, all you can do is check for integer accepting the fact that 1.000 is an integer.

Interesting side note

There was a comment about huge numbers. Huge numbers mean NO problem for this approach; whenever parseInt is unable to handle the number (for it's too big) it will return something else than the actual value so the test will return FALSE. This is a good thing because if you consider something a "number" you normally expect JS to be able to calculate with it - so yes, numbers are limited and parseInt will take this into consideration, to put it this way.

Try this:

<script>

var a = 99999999999999999999;
var b = 999999999999999999999; // just one more 9 will kill the show!
var aIsInteger = (a===parseInt(a))?"a is ok":"a fails";
var bIsInteger = (b===parseInt(b))?"b is ok":"b fails";
alert(aIsInteger+"; "+bIsInteger);

</script>

In my browser (IE8) this returns "a is ok; b fails" which is exactly because of the huge number in b. The limit may vary but I guess 20 digits "ought to be enough for anybody", to quote a classical :)

share|improve this answer
    
This is fine if you only need to check for integral numbers (from a math POV), but if you want to make sure they actually work like integers (from a computing POV) it's going to be incorrect for huge numbers. See this comment. –  Dagg Nabbit Apr 26 at 9:46
    
Mmmmmmm... Why do you think that? I mean, if parseInt returns something and it seems equal to the variable itself, you can be sure your n truly does work as an integer. I found that 99999999999999999999 (that is, 20 times "9") is a number while adding one more "9" makes parseInt fail (returning 1). It may be browser-dependent; however, YES, there is a limit and NO, whatever is off that limit won't return true for the check above. –  dkellner Apr 26 at 15:04
    
What I mean is that bitwise operators (which treat numbers as 32 bit ints) won't give the expected results on numbers which can't be represented as 32 bit ints, so those numbers shouldn't be identified as ints. This is in line with how the proposed Number.isInteger works. –  Dagg Nabbit Apr 27 at 19:57
    
Something can be a true integer without being stored one specific way. I see your point but integers are integers because they don't have a fractional part and can be added/subtracted arbitrarily without getting float-like results. If you treat numbers as bitfields you're supposing something about how they're stored which is - in my opinion - a practically working but not 100% reliable way. If you're looking for "an integer stored in a certain way", well, I'm not sure there is a single-line test you can safely use on all platforms. –  dkellner Apr 28 at 19:32
    
Numbers which can be expressed as 32-bit ints do work 100% reliably with bitwise operators. You are not "supposing anything about how they are stored;" the numbers are converted to signed 32-bit big-endian two's complement integers, per specification. Numbers which cannot be represented in this format should not be considered integers. Again, this is in line with how Number.isInteger works. A single line test is n === (n | 0) as shown in another answer. –  Dagg Nabbit Apr 29 at 21:21
function isInteger(x) { return Math.floor(x) === x; }
function isFloat(x) { return !!(x % 1); }

// give it a spin

isFloat(1.2);          // true
isInteger(1.2);        // false
isFloat(1);            // false
isInteger(1);          // true    
isFloat(2e+2);         // false
isInteger(2e+2);       // true
isFloat('1');          // false
isInteger('1');        // false
isFloat(NaN);          // false
isInteger(NaN);        // false
isFloat(null);         // false
isInteger(null);       // false
isFloat(undefined);    // false
isInteger(undefined);  // false
share|improve this answer

THIS IS FINAL CODE FOR CHECK BOTH INT AND FLOAT

function isInt(n) { 
   if(typeof n == 'number' && Math.Round(n) % 1 == 0) {
       return true;
   } else {
       return false;
   }
} 

OR

function isInt(n) {   
   return typeof n == 'number' && Math.Round(n) % 1 == 0;   
}   
share|improve this answer
    
This only tests for float if n happens to be a number –  hacklikecrack Jun 13 '13 at 7:50
function isInteger(n) {
   return ((typeof n==='number')&&(n%1===0));
}

function isFloat(n) {
   return ((typeof n==='number')&&(n%1!==0));
}

function isNumber(n) {
   return (typeof n==='number');
}
share|improve this answer

Another method is:

    function isFloat(float) {
        return /\./.test(float.toString());
    }

Might not be as efficient as the others but another method all the same.

share|improve this answer
9  
isFloat("So. I'm a float then?"); –  hacklikecrack Jun 13 '13 at 7:48
    
isFloat("°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°°º¤ø,I'm floating.¸,ø¤°º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°°º¤ø,") –  js1568 Mar 14 at 21:00

Condtion for floating validation :

if (lnk.value == +lnk.value && lnk.value != (lnk.value | 0)) 

Condtion for Integer validation :

if (lnk.value == +lnk.value && lnk.value == (lnk.value | 0)) 

Hope this might be helpful.

share|improve this answer

For integers I use this

function integer_or_null(value) {
    if ((undefined === value) || (null === value)) {
        return null;
    }
    if(value % 1 != 0) {
        return null;
    }
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer

It really doesn't have to be so complicated. The numeric value of an integer's parseFloat() and parseInt() equivalents will be the same. Thus you can do like so:

function isInt(value){ 
    return (parseFloat(value) == parseInt(value)) && !isNaN(value);
}

Then

if (isInt(x)) // do work

This will also allow for string checks and thus is not strict. If want a strong type solution (aka, wont work with strings):

function is_int(value){ return !isNaN(parseInt(value * 1) }
share|improve this answer

In java script all the numbers are internally 64 bit floating point, same as double in java. There are no diffrent types in javascript, all are represented by type number. Hence you wil l not be able make a instanceof check. However u can use the above solutions given to find out if it is a fractional number. designers of java script felt with a single type they can avoid numerous type cast errors.

share|improve this answer

Any Float number with a zero decimal part (e.g. 1.0, 12.00, 0.0) are implicitly cast to Integer, so it is not possible to check if they are Float or not.

share|improve this answer

Based on all that I have seen here, I've created my own set of functions to test for what I need:

function NumberValidator() {
this.isFloat = function (n) {
    return typeof(n)==="number" && n === +n && Math.round(n) !== n;
};

this.isInteger = function (n) {
    return typeof(n)==="number" && n === +n && Math.round(n) === n;
};

this.isFloatOrInteger = function (n) {
    return this.isFloat(n) || this.isInteger(n);
};

this.isNonZeroFloatOrInteger = function (n) {
    return this.isFloatOrInteger(n) && n > 0;
};

this.isNonZeroInteger = function (n) {
    return this.isInteger(n) && n > 0;
};
}

However, shime's solution is shorter and with less checks, so it might be a better one.

share|improve this answer

This maybe isn't as performant as the % answer, which prevents you from having to convert to a string first, but I haven't seen anyone post it yet, so here's another option that should work fine:

function isInteger(num) {
    return num.toString().indexOf('.') === -1;
}
share|improve this answer

For those curious, using Benchmark.js I tested the most up-voted answers (and the one posted today) on this post, here are my results:

var n = -10.4375892034758293405790;
var suite = new Benchmark.Suite;
suite
    // kennebec
    .add('0', function() {
        return n % 1 == 0;
    })
    // kennebec
    .add('1', function() {
        return typeof n === 'number' && n % 1 == 0;
    })
    // kennebec
    .add('2', function() {
        return typeof n === 'number' && parseFloat(n) == parseInt(n, 10) && !isNaN(n);
    })

    // Axle
    .add('3', function() {
        return n.toString().indexOf('.') === -1;
    })

    // Dagg Nabbit
    .add('4', function() {
        return n === +n && n === (n|0);
    })

    // warfares
    .add('5', function() {
        return parseInt(n) === n;
    })

    // Marcio Simao
    .add('6', function() {
        return /^-?[0-9]+$/.test(n.toString());
    })

    // Tal Liron
    .add('7', function() {
        if ((undefined === n) || (null === n)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (typeof n == 'number') {
            return true;
        }
        return !isNaN(n - 0);
    });

// Define logs and Run
suite.on('cycle', function(event) {
    console.log(String(event.target));
}).on('complete', function() {
    console.log('Fastest is ' + this.filter('fastest').pluck('name'));
}).run({ 'async': true });

0 x 12,832,357 ops/sec ±0.65% (90 runs sampled)
1 x 12,916,439 ops/sec ±0.62% (95 runs sampled)
2 x 2,776,583 ops/sec ±0.93% (92 runs sampled)
3 x 10,345,379 ops/sec ±0.49% (97 runs sampled)
4 x 53,766,106 ops/sec ±0.66% (93 runs sampled)
5 x 26,514,109 ops/sec ±2.72% (93 runs sampled)
6 x 10,146,270 ops/sec ±2.54% (90 runs sampled)
7 x 60,353,419 ops/sec ±0.35% (97 runs sampled)

Fastest is 7 Tal Liron
share|improve this answer

This is mine:

function isInt(quale) {
    var valore = $('#'+quale).val().toLowerCase();
    if (isNaN(Number(String(valore))) || (valore.indexOf("e") > 0)) {
        // Not int
    } else {
        // Is Int!
    }
}

And this:

function isFloat(quale) {
   var valore = $('#'+quale).val();
   valore = valore.replace(",", "");
   if (isNaN(String(valore)) || (valore.indexOf("e") > 0)) {
    // Not Float
   } else {
    // Float
   }
}

Ad majora!

share|improve this answer

Here's my code. It checks to make sure it's not an empty string (which will otherwise pass) and then converts it to numeric format. Now, depending on whether you want '1.1' to be equal to 1.1, this may or may not be what you're looking for.

var isFloat = function(n) {
    n = n.length > 0 ? Number(n) : false;
    return (n === parseFloat(n));
};
var isInteger = function(n) {
    n = n.length > 0 ? Number(n) : false;
    return (n === parseInt(n));
};

var isNumeric = function(n){

   if(isInteger(n) || isFloat(n)){
        return true;
   }
   return false;

};
share|improve this answer

I like this little function, which will return true for both positive and negative integers:

function isInt(val) {
    return ["string","number"].indexOf(typeof(val)) > -1 && val !== '' && !isNaN(val+".0");
}

This works because 1 or "1" becomes "1.0", which isNaN() returns false on (which we then negate and return), but 1.0 or "1.0" becomes "1.0.0", while "string" becomes "string.0", neither of which are numbers, so isNaN() returns false (and, again, gets negated).

If you only want positive integers, there's this variant:

function isPositiveInt(val) {
    return ["string","number"].indexOf(typeof(val)) > -1 && val !== '' && !isNaN("0"+val);
}

or, for negative integers:

function isNegativeInt(val) {
    return `["string","number"].indexOf(typeof(val)) > -1` && val !== '' && isNaN("0"+val);
}

isPositiveInt() works by moving the concatenated numeric string ahead of the value to be tested. For example, isPositiveInt(1) results in isNaN() evaluating "01", which evaluates false. Meanwhile, isPositiveInt(-1) results in isNaN() evaluating "0-1", which evaluates true. We negate the return value and that gives us what we want. isNegativeInt() works similarly, but without negating the return value of isNaN().

Edit:

My original implementation would also return true on arrays and empty strings. This implementation doe not have that defect. It also has the benefit of returning early if val is not a string or number, or if it's an empty string, making it faster in these cases. You can further modify it by replacing the first two clauses with

typeof(val) != "number"

if you only want to match literal numbers (and not strings)

Edit:

I can't post comments yet, so I'm adding this to my answer. The benchmark posted by @Asok is very informative; however, the fastest function does not fit the requirements, as it also returns TRUE for floats, arrays, booleans, and empty strings.

I created the following test suite to test each of the functions, adding my answer to the list, as well (function 8, which parses strings, and function 9, which does not):

funcs = [
    function(n) {
        return n % 1 == 0;
    },
    function(n) {
        return typeof n === 'number' && n % 1 == 0;
    },
    function(n) {
        return typeof n === 'number' && parseFloat(n) == parseInt(n, 10) && !isNaN(n);
    },
    function(n) {
        return n.toString().indexOf('.') === -1;
    },
    function(n) {
        return n === +n && n === (n|0);
    },
    function(n) {
        return parseInt(n) === n;
    },
    function(n) {
        return /^-?[0-9]+$/.test(n.toString());
    },
    function(n) {
        if ((undefined === n) || (null === n)) {
            return false;
        }
        if (typeof n == 'number') {
            return true;
        }
        return !isNaN(n - 0);
    },
    function(n) {
        return ["string","number"].indexOf(typeof(n)) > -1 && n !== '' && !isNaN(n+".0");
    }
];
vals = [
    [1,true],
    [-1,true],
    [1.1,false],
    [-1.1,false],
    [[],false],
    [{},false],
    [true,false],
    [false,false],
    [null,false],
    ["",false],
    ["a",false],
    ["1",null],
    ["-1",null],
    ["1.1",null],
    ["-1.1",null]
];

for (var i in funcs) {
    var pass = true;
    console.log("Testing function "+i);
    for (var ii in vals) {
        var n = vals[ii][0];
        var ns;
        if (n === null) {
            ns = n+"";
        } else {
            switch (typeof(n)) {
                case "string":
                    ns = "'" + n + "'";
                    break;
                case "object":
                    ns = Object.prototype.toString.call(n);
                    break;
                default:
                    ns = n;
            }
            ns = "("+typeof(n)+") "+ns;
        }

        var x = vals[ii][1];
        var xs;
        if (x === null) {
            xs = "(ANY)";
        } else {
            switch (typeof(x)) {
                case "string":
                    xs = "'" + n + "'";
                    break;
                case "object":
                    xs = Object.prototype.toString.call(x);
                    break;
                default:
                    xs = x;
            }
            xs = "("+typeof(x)+") "+xs;
        }

        var rms;
        try {
            var r = funcs[i](n);
            var rs;
            if (r === null) {
                rs = r+"";
            } else {
                switch (typeof(r)) {
                    case "string":
                        rs = "'" + r + "'";
                        break;
                    case "object":
                        rs = Object.prototype.toString.call(r);
                        break;
                    default:
                        rs = r;
                }
                rs = "("+typeof(r)+") "+rs;
            }

            var m;
            var ms;
            if (x === null) {
                m = true;
                ms = "N/A";
            } else if (typeof(x) == 'object') {
                m = (xs === rs);
                ms = m;
            } else {
                m = (x === r);
                ms = m;
            }
            if (!m) {
                pass = false;
            }
            rms = "Result: "+rs+", Match: "+ms;
        } catch (e) {
            rms = "Test skipped; function threw exception!"
        }

        console.log("    Value: "+ns+", Expect: "+xs+", "+rms);
    }
    console.log(pass ? "PASS!" : "FAIL!");
}

I also reran the benchmark with function #8 added to the list. I won't post the result, as they're a bit embarrassing (e.g. that function is NOT fast)...

The (abridged -- I removed successful tests, since the output is quite long) results are as follows:

Testing function 0
Value: (object) [object Array], Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) true, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) false, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: null, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) '', Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
FAIL!

Testing function 1
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 2
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 3
Value: (object) true, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (object) false, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) [object Array], Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) [object Object], Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: null, Expect: (boolean) false, Test skipped; function threw exception!
Value: (string) '', Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) 'a', Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
FAIL!

Testing function 4
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 5
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 6
Value: null, Expect: (boolean) false, Test skipped; function threw exception!
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 7
Value: (number) 1.1, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (number) -1.1, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (object) true, Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) [object Array], Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (boolean) [object Object], Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) '', Expect: (boolean) false, Result: (boolean) true, Match: false
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
FAIL!

Testing function 8
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) true, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

Testing function 9
Value: (string) '1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
Value: (string) '-1.1', Expect: (ANY), Result: (boolean) false, Match: N/A
PASS!

I've left in failures so you can see where each function is failing, and the (string) '#' tests so you can see how each function handles integer and float values in strings, as some may want these parsed as numbers and some may not.

Out of the 10 functions tested, the ones that actually fit OP's requirements are [1,3,5,6,8,9]

share|improve this answer

The functions below guard against empty strings,undefines,nulls, and max/min value ranges. The Javascript engine should have built in these functions from day one. :)

Enjoy!

function IsInteger(iVal) {
    var iParsedVal; //our internal converted int value


    iParsedVal = parseInt(iVal);

    if (isNaN(iParsedVal) || Infinity == iParsedVal || -Infinity == iParsedVal) //sanity check - guard against empty strings and max/min values
        return false;
    else
        return Number(iVal) === (iParsedVal | 0); //the 2nd operand group (intValue | 0), evaluates to true only if the intValue is an integer; so an int type will only return true
}

function IsFloat(fVal) {
    var fParsedVal; //our internal converted float value


    fParsedVal = parseFloat(fVal);

    if (isNaN(fParsedVal) || Infinity == fParsedVal || -Infinity == fParsedVal) //sanity check - guard against empty strings and max/min values
        return false;
    else
        return !!(fVal % 1); //true only if there is a fractional value after the mod op; the !! returns the opposite value of the op which reflects the function's return value
}
share|improve this answer
parseInt(yourNumber)=== parseFloat(yourNumber)
share|improve this answer

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