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I have what I think is a very simple databinding question (I'm still new to WPF). I have a class (simplified for this question)

public class ConfigurationData
{
    public int BaudRate { get; set; } 
}

In MainWindow.Xaml.cs I have a private member variable:

private ConfigurationData m_data;

and a method

void DoStuff()
{
   // do a bunch of stuff (read serial port?) which may result in calling...
   m_data.BaudRate = 300; // or some other value depending on logic
}

In my MainWindow gui, I'd like to have a TextBox that displays m_data.BaudRate AND allows for two way binding. The user should be able to enter a value in the textbox, and the textbox should display new values that we're caused by "DoStuff()" method. I've seen tons of examples on binding to another property of a control on MainWindow, and binding to a datacollection, but no examples of binding to a property of another object. I would think that my example is about as simple as it get, with the nagging annoyance that I'm binding to an integer, not a string, and if possible, I would like the user to only be able to enter integers.
BTW I considered using a numeric up/down, but decided against it as there did not seem to be a lot of support/examples of non-commercial numeric up/down controls. Plus, it could be an awfully big range of numbers to spin through.

I think a pointer to one good example would get me on my way. Many thanks in advance, Dave

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1  
I should have said that I think a pointer to one good example would set me on my way. –  Dave Oct 7 '10 at 22:04
    
This does not work (syntac error) <TextBox Text="{Binding Source={m_data}, Path=BaudRate}" Height="23" Margin="137,70,21,0" Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" /> I did see that one can setup a "resource" in the Xaml. This would seem to be overkill for me. Can't I just do it inline somehow? It's only one time I'm going to bind to m_data. Aside: Is it possible to format code or use the return key in comments :) ? –  Dave Oct 7 '10 at 22:14
    
Just wanted to note that a numeric up-down (or spinner) control also helps with preventing non-numerical keyboard input and min/max validations, not just the actual spinning of numbers. I think there's one in Bag of Tricks that does the job decently (you only need to style it properly). –  Alex Paven Oct 7 '10 at 23:02
    
Thanks for the comment Alex. Unfortunately, I saw your comment at work where we use Visual Studio 2008 (sigh). The "Bag of Tricks" (github.com/thinkpixellab/bot is what I saw) seems to only have the Visual Studio 2010 code. I'll look at it at home. –  Dave Oct 8 '10 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

Although this question is old, it's a good one, and is rarely answered succinctly. Let me offer a simplified solution for others who come upon this page.

In order to support two-way binding, your initial ConfigurationData class must be expanded to support property changes. Otherwise the changes in DoStuff() will not be reflected in the UI textbox. Here is a typical way of doing that:

using System.ComponentModel;
public class ConfigurationData : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private int _BaudRate;
    public int BaudRate
    {
        get { return _BaudRate; }
        set { _BaudRate = value; OnPropertyChanged("BaudRate"); }
    }

    //below is the boilerplate code supporting PropertyChanged events:
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string name)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
}

I choose to put the textbox binding right in the XAML (I've also added a button to DoStuff), like so:

<Canvas>
    <TextBox Width="96" Name="textBox1" Text="{Binding BaudRate}" />
    <Button  Width="96" Canvas.Top="25" Content="ChangeNumber" Click="DoStuff"/>
</Canvas>

The tricky part is gluing this all together. For that you'll need to define your DataContext. I prefer to do this in the constructor of my main window. Here's the code:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private ConfigurationData m_data;
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        m_data = new ConfigurationData();
        this.DataContext = m_data;  // This is the glue that connects the
                                    // textbox to the object instance
    }

    private void DoStuff(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        m_data.BaudRate += 300;
    }
}
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+1 Great explanation. –  Sabuncu Nov 6 at 20:10

I'm sure there's a better way (please tell me!), but here's one way I cobbled together that works. It seems that there should be an easier way. For the property BaudRate use:

public int BaudRate
    {
        get
        { 
            return m_baudRate;
        }
        set 
        {
            if (value != m_baudRate)
            {
                m_baudRate = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("BaudRate");//OnPropertyChanged definition left out here, but it's pretty standard
            }
        }
    }

For the XAML, I have no significant markup:

<TextBox  Height="23" Margin="137,70,21,0" Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top"  />

Now this is the messy part... Create class for validation:

public class IntRangeRule : ValidationRule
{
    // See ValidationRule Class
    public override ValidationResult Validate(object value, System.Globalization.CultureInfo cultureInfo)
    {
        try
        {
            if (value is int) // replace with your own logic or more robust handling...
            {
                return new ValidationResult(true, "Fine");
            }
            else
            {
                return new ValidationResult(false, "Illegal characters or ");
            }
        }

        catch (Exception e)
        {
            return new ValidationResult(false, "Illegal characters or " + e.Message);
        }


    }
}

And then in the constructor of Window1 (MainWindow), have:

Binding myBinding = new Binding("BaudRate");
        myBinding.NotifyOnValidationError = true;
        myBinding.Mode = BindingMode.TwoWay;
        ValidationRule rule = new IntRangeRule();
                    myBinding.ValidationRules.Add(rule);
        myBinding.Source = m_data; // where m_data is the member variable of type ConfigurationData
        textBox1.SetBinding(TextBox.TextProperty, myBinding);

All my attempts to do everything in markup failed. Better ways?

Dave

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