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Similar to how NSLog takes variable argument list, I want to create my own method.

I have my method declared like this but when I try to access the 'args' variable, I get an EXEC_BAD_ACCESS. What is that I'm not doing correctly here?

- (void)info:(NSString *)formatString, ...
{   
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, formatString);

    NSLog(@"formatString value: %@", formatString);

    // The following line causes the EXEC_BAD_ACCESS
    NSLog(@"args value: %@", args);

    // This is what I'm trying to do:
    NSLog(formatString, args);

    va_end(args);               
}

I was following the 'va_list in Cocoa' section from this blog: http://cocoawithlove.com/2009/05/variable-argument-lists-in-cocoa.html

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are a couple of mistakes in your code. Firstly, args cannot be printed directly as is. It is a reference to several arguments, and trying to print it using NSLog("%@") will not work. What you can do is use NSLogv() to print it (e.g. NSLogv(format, args);) instead.

Or you can do what I do, and use this function:

void print (NSString *format, ...) {
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, format);

    fputs([[[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:format arguments:args] autorelease] UTF8String], stdout);

    va_end(args);
}
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thanks - I didn't realize that NSLogv is what should be used. –  Justin Galzic Oct 7 '10 at 22:46

The "%@" format directive takes an argument, interprets it as an Objective-C object and sends it the "description" selector. That needs to return a NSString which is printed.

So you code is trying to execute ‘[args description]‘, but args is not a Objective-C object, it's of type ‘va_list‘. Hence the exception.

See your link, the implementation of "setContentByAppendingStrings:" shows how do get the arguments out of your va_list.

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Morning lads,

I just have been confronted with the very similar issue. Here is what I was doing:

+ (void) l:(D3LogLevel)p_logLevel s:(NSString *)p_format, ...
{
    if (p_logLevel >= logLevel) {
        va_list v_args;
        va_start(v_args, p_format);
        NSLog(@"[%d] %@", p_logLevel, [NSString stringWithFormat:p_format, v_args]);
        va_end(v_args);
    }
}

Which, as DarkDust here has described accurately, uses v_args as an Objective-C object when it is not. Here is the culprit call:

[NSString stringWithFormat:p_format, v_args]

Hence the modification to take a va_list:

[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:p_format arguments:v_args]

Making use of the appropriate method initWithFormat which signature is:

- (id)initWithFormat:(NSString *)format arguments:(va_list)argList

We can see that the type is right and everything becomes crystal clear. The full rewritten method is then:

+ (void) l:(D3LogLevel)p_logLevel s:(NSString *)p_format, ...
{
    if (p_logLevel >= logLevel) {
        va_list v_args;
        va_start(v_args, p_format);
        NSLog(@"[%d] %@", p_logLevel, [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:p_format arguments:v_args]);
        va_end(v_args);
    }
}

It works like a charm!

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