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I have the following sed -e 's/<em\:update.*//g' install.rdf > install.rdf in a bash script, and it works on command line, but in the bash script install.rdf ends up a blank file.

When I run sed -e 's/<em\:update.*//g' install.rdf > install.rdf command line, then 2 lines are stripped out of the file.

Any idea why sed -e 's/<em\:update.*//g' install.rdf > install.rdf is not working in the bash script?

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What UNIX and version of sed do you have? –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 8 '10 at 0:00
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

sed -i -e 's/<em\:update.*//g' install.rdf

When you redirect output to a file in truncate mode, the file is truncated first, before it's read. Thus, the result is an empty file. Using sed -i avoids this.

Portable (and hopefully not too insecure) solution:

(set -C &&
 sed -e 's/<em\:update.*//g' install.rdf > install.rdf.$$ &&
 mv install.rdf.$$ install.rdf)

:-)

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However, -i is a GNU extension. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 8 '10 at 0:03
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@Matthew: Thanks! Fixed up the answer with something a little more general (albeit insecure if the directory is writable by malicious parties). –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 8 '10 at 0:05
2  
The shell variable $$ is classically used for non-hostile environments avoiding problems with shared names: sed ... install.rdf > install.rdf.$$; mv install.rdf.$$ install.rdf. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 8 '10 at 0:21
1  
@Jonathan: I've revised my solution with your suggestion, as well using set -C to mitigate symlink attacks or anything. It can fail if the filename is already taken, but at least people can't trick you into clobbering files you don't intend to. ;-) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 8 '10 at 2:00
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