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Suppose I have a simple code like this:

public class ExternalizeStringDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello world");
    }
}

Now, I want to externalize the greeting, perhaps to facilitate internationalization/localization/etc. Using Eclipse, I can use the String Externalization wizard (Source/Externalize Strings), and configure it like this:

alt text

I can proceed with the wizard and it will propose these changes:

  • Create file Personal Toys/src/Messages.java
  • Create file Personal Toys/src/messages.properties
  • Edit ExternalizeStringDemo.java
    • "Hello World" becomes Messages.getString("DEMO_GREETING")

My question is simple: can I ask Eclipse to externalize the access to use the key as field names instead? That is, I want the access to be e.g. Messages.DEMO_GREETING.

Note: if the [Substitution pattern] is simple ${key}, then the generated code is Messages."DEMO_GREETING", which is not a valid Java code.


If this is not possible, then what's the next best thing? (I'm thinking Eclipse regex find/replace?).

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1 Answer 1

Eclipse has a new string externalization mechanism that does exactly this; it uses its own new message bundle instead of Java's. You need to include the org.eclipse.osgi….jar in your project's build path to use it.

help.eclipse.org - Java development user guide > Reference > Wizards and Dialogs > Externalize Strings Wizard

  • Use Eclipse's string externalization mechanism
    • If unchecked the standard externalization mechanism is used, otherwise the new Eclipse string externalization mechanism is used.
    • Note: Only present if the project build path contains org.eclipse.osgi.util.NLS

The before-and-after is shown in the feature documentation:

Old Code:

public class MyClass {
   public void myMethod() {
      String message;
      ...
      // no args
      message = Messages.getString("key.one"); //$NON-NLS-1$
      ...
      // bind one arg
      message = MessageFormat.format(
          Messages.getString("key.two"),
          new Object[] {"example usage"}
        ); //$NON-NLS-1$ //$NON-NLS-2$
      ...
   }
}

New Code:

public class MyClass {
   public void myMethod() {
      String message;
      ...
      // no args
      message = Messages.key_one;
      ...
      // bind one arg
      message = NLS.bind(Messages.key_two, "example usage"); //$NON-NLS-1$
      ...
   }
}

Screenshots

The setup:

alt text

Then the proposed changes:

alt text

Related links

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4  
The new Eclipse Externalization is also better in terms of memory footprint. But there is only one little caveat. you can't dynamically change the locale as the constants are bound to a value based on the selected locale on the first access of the field using reflection. It also helps in identifying strings which/constants which are not properly externalized issuing warnings/errors. I remember we had to modify the NLS class to add support for this but overall it has a very low memory footprint as compared to the standard ResourceBundle based localization which uses Maps at the backend. –  Faisal Feroz Oct 9 '10 at 9:44

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