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I have a method which is given the parameter "bool sortAscending". Now I want to use LINQ to create sorted list depending on this parameter. I got then this:

var ascendingQuery = from data in dataList
                      orderby data.Property ascending
                      select data;

var descendingQuery = from data in dataList
                      orderby data.Property descending
                      select data;

As you can see, both queries differ only in "ascending" resp. "descending". I'd like to merge both queries, but I don't know how. Does anyone have the answer?

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So you want to have one query that can do both ascending or descending depending on the bool sortAsvending value? Is that correct. –  Nathan W Dec 23 '08 at 11:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You can easily create your own extension method on IEnumerable or IQueryable:

public static IOrderedEnumerable<TSource> OrderByWithDirection<TSource,TKey>
    (this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
     Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector,
     bool descending)
{
    return descending ? source.OrderByDescending(keySelector)
                      : source.OrderBy(keySelector);
}

public static IOrderedQueryable<TSource> OrderByWithDirection<TSource,TKey>
    (this IQueryable<TSource> source,
     Expression<Func<TSource, TKey>> keySelector,
     bool descending)
{
    return descending ? source.OrderByDescending(keySelector)
                      : source.OrderBy(keySelector);
}

Yes, you lose the ability to use a query expression here - but frankly I don't think you're actually benefiting from a query expression anyway in this case. Query expressions are great for complex things, but if you're only doing a single operation it's simpler to just put that one operation:

var query = dataList.OrderByWithDirection(x => x.Property, direction);
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2  
Thanks for correcting my stupidity Marc :) (That's the problem with posting just before going to lunch...) –  Jon Skeet Dec 23 '08 at 12:40
    
Well, you give so few opportunities ;-p –  Marc Gravell Dec 24 '08 at 12:55
2  
This post was answered and edited by two celebrities of SO.com –  Johnny_D May 12 '12 at 13:34
    
shouldn't one of the OrderByWithDirections return ascending? –  Ctrl_Alt_Defeat Mar 6 '13 at 10:43
1  
@KOL: I'm not sure what you mean. Both of them will return ascending if you pass in false for descending. –  Jon Skeet Mar 6 '13 at 13:11

In terms of how this is implemented, this changes the method - from OrderBy/ThenBy to OrderByDescending/ThenByDescending. However, you can apply the sort separately to the main query...

var qry = from .... // or just dataList.AsEnumerable()/AsQueryable()

if(sortAscending) {
    qry = qry.OrderBy(x=>x.Property);
} else {
    qry = qry.OrderByDescending(x=>x.Property);
}

Any use? You can create the entire "order" dynamically, but it is more involved...

Another trick (mainly appropriate to LINQ-to-Objects) is to use a multiplier, of -1/1. This is only really useful for numeric data, but is a cheeky way of achieving the same outcome.

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I was just about to write this exact same thing then my VS froze :( –  Nathan W Dec 23 '08 at 12:00
    
Using a multiplier also fails for a return value of int.MinValue. –  Jon Skeet Dec 23 '08 at 12:09

What about ordering desc by the desired property,

   blah = blah.OrderByDescending(x => x.Property);

And then doing something like

  if (!descending)
  {
       blah = blah.Reverse()
  }
  else
  {
      // Already sorted desc ;)
  }

Is it Reverse() too slow?

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