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Size of an array is n.All elements in the array are distinct in the range of [0 , n-1] except two elements.Find out repeated element without using extra temporary array with constant time complexity.

I tried with o(n) like this.

   a[]={1,0,0,2,3};
    b[]={-1,-1,-1,-1,-1};
    i=0;
    int required;
    while(i<n)
    {
      b[a[i]]++;
      if(b[a[i]==1)
        required=a[i];
    }
    print required;

If there is no constraint on range of numbers i.e allowing out of range also.Is it possible get o(n) solution without temporary array.

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1  
What have you tried, and where are you stuck? –  Michael Petrotta Oct 8 '10 at 2:27
1  
Is this homework? This isn't really the kind of question for SO. (Unless it's homework.) –  JoshD Oct 8 '10 at 2:27
4  
This can be done in O(1) time? Are you sure you're not messing it up with linear time? The solution I can think of still requires you to go through n elements. –  birryree Oct 8 '10 at 2:29
7  
You cannot solve this problem in constant-time. Since you don't know where the elements are in advance, and no ordering is stipulated, you require at least O(n) time. –  Marcelo Cantos Oct 8 '10 at 2:31
1  
Missing homework or interview-question tag... –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 2:42

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Look what is first and last number
  2. Calculate SUM(1) of array elements without duplicate (like you know that sum of 1...5 = 1+2+3+4+5 = 15. Call it SUM(1)). As AaronMcSmooth pointed out, the formula is Sum(1, n) = (n+1)n/2.
  3. Calculate SUM(2) of the elements in array that is given to you.
  4. Subtract SUM(2) - SUM(1). Whoa! The result is the duplicate number (like if a given array is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 3, the SUM(2) will be 18. 18 - 15 = 3. So 3 is a duplicate).

Good luck coding!

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1  
This isn't O(1), as it requires you to iterate over not one, but two arrays. Also, having an array without a duplicate counts as having a temporary array. –  Rafe Kettler Oct 8 '10 at 2:36
1  
@rafe Kettler, you can use the identity Sum(1, n) = (n+1)n/2 for step 2 –  aaronasterling Oct 8 '10 at 2:37
2  
@Rafe: that is not a temporary array. Summing the numbers 1 through n-1 does not require first putting them in an array, even if you forget the formula to do it. –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 2:46
2  
@Vlad: If n=6, then the values are taken from the range 0 to 5. What if another value had been omitted instead of the 0 being omitted? –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 2:54
1  
@Vlad Lazarenko: No. The approach you suggested does not work, regardless of how you spin it. One value A is missing, another value B is duplicated (basically, substituted instead of A). That will increase the sum by B - A. That's what you find by your algorithm: the B - A value. However, knowing B - A is still not enough to determine neither B nor A. Knowing that the sum has increased by 2 would mean that 5 was replaced by 7 (7 is duplicated), or that 1 was replaced by 3 (3 is duplicated) or lots of other possibilities. –  AndreyT Oct 8 '10 at 3:33

XOR all the elements together, then XOR the result with XOR([0..n-1]).

This gives you missing XOR repeat; since missing!=repeat, at least one bit is set in missing XOR repeat.

Pick one of those set bits. Iterate over all the elements again, and only XOR elements with that bit set. Then iterate from 1 to n-1 and XOR those numbers that have that bit set.

Now, the value is either the repeated value or the missing value. Scan the elements for that value. If you find it, it's the repeated element. Otherwise, it's the missing value so XOR it with missing XOR repeat.

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Another O(n log n) approach, but completely different from mine. :-) –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 3:57
    
@R.. Are you sure this isn't linear complexity? –  Mark B Oct 8 '10 at 4:15
    
Actually I think you're right. I read it as an iterative approach where you peel off a bit at a time, but indeed there are only 2 passes over the array and 2 passes over the values 1 to n-1. So I think this is the answer! –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 4:27
2  
The last pass can be eliminated. When you are making the first pass, calculate the sum S (per Vlad) together with your XOR. The sign of the S - SUM(0...n-1) will tell you whether the missing is greater or smaller than the repeated. When you are making the second pass, you can also independently XOR the numbers that has that bit not set (and the same for numbers in 0...n-1 range). That way you will determine the second number as well. I.e. now you know both missing and repeated. Since you know whether the repeated is greater or smaller, you can tell which one is repeated right away. –  AndreyT Oct 8 '10 at 5:00
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@AndreyT: I like your first suggestion, but the second suggestion seems like a waste of time in the loop. It's easier just to do a single XOR operation at the end to get the other value. –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 5:12

Pick two distinct random indexes. If the array values at those indexes are the same, return true.

This operates in constant time. As a bonus, you get the right answer with probability 2/n * 1/(n-1).

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You mean 2/(n*(n-1)). Better than you thought! –  aschepler Oct 8 '10 at 2:49
    
@aschepler - ah yes, you're right :) –  sje397 Oct 8 '10 at 2:53
    
How is random constant? The number of expected lookups into the array increases with the array size, which is also known as O(n) –  matt b Oct 8 '10 at 3:10
    
I'm only picking 2 indexes, once. It doesn't usually work - that's the point. An O(1) algorithm that always works is impossible. –  sje397 Oct 8 '10 at 3:13
    
ah, I was assuming you kept trying until you returned true (or checked every index) –  matt b Oct 8 '10 at 3:14

O(n) without the temp array.

a[]={1,0,0,2,3};
i=0;
int required;
while(i<n)
{
  a[a[i] % n] += n;
  if(a[a[i] % n] >= 2 * n)
    required = a[i] % n;
}
print required;

(Assuming of course that n < MAX_INT - 2n)

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I consider this temporary space. –  R.. Oct 8 '10 at 3:56
    
@R, how do you consider this to use temp space? –  AShelly Oct 8 '10 at 13:45

This example could be useful for int, char, and string.

char[] ch = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'F', 'A', 'B' };
Dictionary<char, int> result = new Dictionary<char, int>();
foreach (char c in ch)
{
   if (result.Keys.Contains(c))
   {
       result[c] = result[c] + 1;
   }
   else
   {
       result.Add(c, 1);
   }
}
foreach (KeyValuePair<char, int> pair in result)
{
   if (pair.Value > 1)
   {
       Console.WriteLine(pair.Key);
   }
}
Console.Read();
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Build a lookup table. Lookup. Done.

Non-temporary array solution:

Build lookup into gate array hardware, invoke.

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Wouldn't that involve a temporary array? –  sje397 Oct 8 '10 at 3:13
    
Huge temporary storage for sure... but it is constant size! –  Hogan Oct 8 '10 at 3:18

The best I can do is O(n log n) in time and O(1) in space:

The basic idea is to perform a binary search of the values 0 through n-1, passing over the whole array of n elements at each step.

  1. Initially, let i=0, j=n-1 and k=(i+j)/2.
  2. On each run through the array, sum the elements whose values are in the range i to k, and count the number of elements in this range.
  3. If the sum is equal to (k-i)*(k-i+1)/2 + i*(k-i+1), then the range i through k has neither the duplicate nor the omitted value. If the count of elements is less than k-i+1, then the range has the omitted value but not the duplicate. In either case, replace i by k+1 and k by the new value of (i+j)/2.
  4. Else, replace j by k and k by the new value of (i+j)/2.
  5. If i!=j, goto 2.

The algorithm terminates with i==j and both equal to the duplicate element.

(Note: I edited this to simplify it. The old version could have found either the duplicate or the omitted element, and had to use Vlad's difference trick to find the duplicate if the initial search turned up the omitted value instead.)

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Lazy solution: Put the elements to java.util.Set one by one by add(E) until getting add(E)==false.

Sorry no constant-time. HashMap:O(N), TreeSet:O(lgN * N).

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That might not be O(1) –  Utkarsh Sinha Oct 8 '10 at 2:42
    
O(n) (assuming java.util.Set has O(1) cost.) –  aaronasterling Oct 8 '10 at 2:42
    
@AaronMcSmooth - I don't see how it could be O(1) –  sje397 Oct 8 '10 at 3:05
    
@sje, I was a little sloppy, O(1) insert cost. Python's sets and dicts have O(1) for average case so it's certainly possible. And I'm referring to time complexity because that's what OP originally said. It's obvious that this breaks the requirement for O(1) additional space. –  aaronasterling Oct 8 '10 at 3:18
1  
Depends on whether the Set implementation is a HashSet or a TreeSet. With a TreeSet, you have O(lg n) insert cost, but presumably here you would use a HashSet, which should have O(1) amortized insert cost, if tell it the expected capacity (which you know) and possibly the load factor (though the default likely will suffice) –  James Oct 8 '10 at 4:07

Based on @sje's answer. Worst case is 2 passes through the array, no additional storage, non destructive.

O(n) without the temp array.

a[]={1,0,0,2,3};
i=0;
int required;
while (a[a[i] % n] < n)    
   a[a[i++] % n] += n;

required = a[i] % n;
while (i-->0)
   a[a[i]%n]-=n;

print required;

(Assuming of course that n < MAX_INT/2)

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