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Using JavaScript, how do I NOT detect 0, but otherwise detect null or empty strings?

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use val === "" to ensure that val is a string in that second test. –  Warty Oct 8 '10 at 5:12
1  
I don't know about you, but it's easier for me to logically follow this sentence: "How do I detect null or empty strings, but not 0". The only reason I mention this is because structuring code in the order you'd say it can sometimes make it easier to implement. –  Josh Smeaton Oct 8 '10 at 7:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

From your question title:

if( val === null || val == "" )

I can only see that you forgot a = when attempting to strict-equality-compare val with the empty string:

if( val === null || val === "" )

Testing with Firebug:

>>> 0 === null || 0 == ""
true

>>> 0 === null || 0 === ""
false

EDIT: see CMS's comment instead for the explanation.

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Oh so an empty string is the same as 0 with ==? Odd. Thanks! –  Hamster Oct 8 '10 at 5:09
1  
Yes; in fact, that's one of the biggest reasons to prefer === over ==. Due to automatic conversion, false == 0 == "", but false !== 0 !== "". –  Amber Oct 8 '10 at 5:11
1  
Good, good +1. Would a better word for translated be coerced? (just thinking aloud) :) –  alex Oct 8 '10 at 5:17
    
@alex: Yes, it would. Thanks :) –  BoltClock Oct 8 '10 at 5:22
3  
Actually, 0 == "" doesn't coerce to false == false, at the end the compared values will be: 0 == 0. That happens because if one of the operands of the Equals Operator is a Number value, the other will be also converted to Number, and an empty or whitespace only string, type-converts to 0, e.g.: +"" or Number(""). Another example: 0 == { valueOf:function () { return 0;} } evaluates to true, because the object defines an own valueOf method, which is used internally by the ToNumber operation, and we know it doesn't coerce to false, because an object is never falsy. –  CMS Oct 8 '10 at 6:23

If you want to detect all falsey values except zero:

if (!foo && foo !== 0) 

So this will detect null, empty strings, false, undefined, etc.

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If I understood correctly, you wanted to detect a non empty string?

function isNonEmptyString(val) {
  return (typeof val == 'string' && val!='');
}
/*
  isNonEmptyString(0); // returns false
  isNonEmptyString(""); // returns false
  isNonEmptyString(null); // returns false
  isNonEmptyString("something"); // returns true
*/
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