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#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{

};
class B
{
        public:
                void disp()
                {
                        cout<<" This is not virtual function.";
                }
};
class C
{
        public:
                virtual void disp()
                {
                        cout<<"This is virtual function.";
                }
};
int main()
{
        cout<<"class A"<<sizeof(A)<<endl;
        cout<<"class B"<<sizeof(B)<<endl;
        cout<<"class C"<<sizeof(C)<<endl;
        return 0;
}

sizeof class A and class B are both 1 byte only.What about the memory allocation for member function disp in B.

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Do you mean why it doesn't have size equal to 1 byte? –  skwllsp Oct 8 '10 at 6:06
    
what was the size of class C? –  KhanS Oct 8 '10 at 6:14
    
A much more interesting question should be why do A and B have a size 1 rather than 0 –  Loki Astari Oct 8 '10 at 7:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

For each instance of the class, memory is allocated to only its member variables i.e. each instance of the class doesn't get it's own copy of the member function. All instances share the same member function code. You can imagine it as compiler passing a hidden this pointer for each member function so that it operates on the correct object. In your case, since C++ standard explictly prohibits 0 sized objects, class A and class B have the minimum possible size of 1. In case of class C since there is a virtual function each instance of the class C will have a pointer to its v-table (this is compiler specific though). So the sizeof this class will be sizeof(pointer).

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Very nicely said. –  JoshD Oct 8 '10 at 6:12
    
this also answers a nagging question i had re thread-safety - thanks –  slashmais Oct 8 '10 at 6:30
1  
@Martin York : The Standard does prohibit size 0 objects. C++03 [Section 9/3] says Complete objects and member subobjects of class type shall have nonzero size. –  Prasoon Saurav Oct 8 '10 at 7:47
    
@Naveen: Well explained description. I have a doubt, A class containing a virtual function will have a unique vptr or each instance of the class has different vptr? –  LinuxPenseur Nov 21 '11 at 9:59

Non-virtual member functions do not need to be "allocated" anywhere; they can essentially be treated as normal non-class functions with an implicit first parameter of the class instance. They do not add to the class size normally.

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Non-virtual functions aren't part of the class's memory. The code for the function is baked into the executable (much like a static member), and memory is allocated for it's variables when it is called. The object only carries the data members.

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Size of any class depends upon the size of the variables in the class and not the functions. Functions are only allocated space on the stack when called and popped out when return.. So the size of a class is generally the sum of sizes of non static member variables...

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