Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some lines stored in a text file called bashrc_snippet. I would like to insert them into .bashrc. Since I sometimes change the contents of the text file I would like to be able to re-insert them in the .bashrc-file. To do this I want to use marker lines:

# User things
HISTSIZE=1000

#START
alias ls='ls --color=tty'
... some more lines
#END

I would like a bash script to do this (possibly by using sed or awk). The algoritm should be:

  • If the marker lines are missing add them at the end of the file (and the lines of text)
  • If the marker lines are present, replace the contents between them with the new lines of text
share|improve this question
2  
Isn't it better to use command "source bashrc_snippet" instead putting the content of the file in your .bashrc? –  hluk Oct 8 '10 at 6:40
    
Perhaps. But then I need a way to insert the "source bashrc_snippet" into .bashrc and make sure there is only one source-ing. I'm deploying this on many hosts and I don't want to hand edit the .bashrc file. –  Lennart Schedin Oct 8 '10 at 6:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

don't really understand your requirement, but here's a guess

#!/bin/bash

rcfile="$1"
snippet="$2"
var=$(<"$snippet")
if grep -q "START" "$rcfile" ;then
   awk -v v="$var" '/START/ {
     print $0
     print v
     f=1
   }f &&!/END/{next}/END/{f=0}!f' "$rcfile" >t && mv t "$rcfile"
else
   echo "#START" >> "$rcfile"
   echo "$var" >> "$rcfile"
   echo "#END" >> "$rcfile"
fi

to use:

$  ./test.sh rc_file bashrc_snippet
share|improve this answer
    
It looks promising. But there is a small bug: when marker does not exist it writes to the rcFile, but when the marker exist it writes to stdout. –  Lennart Schedin Oct 8 '10 at 7:53
    
well, it really isn't too difficult to redirect and rename it. see edit. i/o redirection are really basic stuff in using the shell so you could have easily solved it yourself. –  ghostdog74 Oct 8 '10 at 8:06
    
Thanks! It works well! –  Lennart Schedin Oct 8 '10 at 10:36

I would like to suggest this (ex or vim commands):

ex -c '/^#START/+1,/^#END/-1 d' -c '/^#START/ r bashrc_snippet' -c 'wq'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the answer to what he wanted, but the chosen answer should go to @hluk for providing what Lennart needs –  Kimvais Oct 8 '10 at 6:44
    
I cannot agree more –  Benoit Oct 8 '10 at 8:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.