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I want to get the lines from a file from the line which contains the last occurance of a given word.

Ex:

True, there have been some
changes in the plot. In the original,
Kane tried to buy high political
office for himself. In the new version,
he just puts politicians on his payroll.

If I give "In" then I need

office for himself. In the new version,
he just puts politicians on his payroll.

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You should format your example with correct line breaks, using the "code" formatting, otherwise it is not possible understand what you want. –  enzotib Oct 8 '10 at 6:57

4 Answers 4

Try:

grep 'yourWord' yourFile.txt | tail -n1

Or with sed:

sed -n '/yourWord/{$p}' yourFile.txt
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Actually i need the whole text which is under the line where the pattern matches @ last –  Vijay Athreyan Oct 8 '10 at 9:06
$ word="In"
$ awk -vw="$word" '{s=s$0}END{ m=split(s,str,w); print w str[m]}' file
In the new version, he just puts politicians on his payroll.

I don't understand why there is "office for himself." though.

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Its Just a format mistake. Sorry. Thanks for the responce... –  Vijay Athreyan Oct 8 '10 at 9:04

This should work:

As a one-liner:

patt=In
sed -nr "/$patt/!b;:a;\$!N;/\n.*$patt/{h;s/\n[^\n]*\$//;g;s/^.*\n//};\$!ba;p" inputfile

If your sed requires -e:

patt=In
sed -nr -e "/$patt/!b" -e ":a" -e "\$!N" -e "/\n.*$patt/{h" -e "s/\n[^\n]*\$//" -e "g" -e "s/^.*\n//}" -e "\$!ba" -e "p" inputfile

On separate lines:

patt=In
sed -nr "
    /$patt/!b
    :a
    \$!N
    /\n.*$patt/{
    h
    s/\n[^\n]*\$//
    g
    s/^.*\n//
    }
    \$!ba
    p' inputfile
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I can print the 4th line and end of line only

My command is

sed -n '4,$p' file

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