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I have a class Derived which is derived from class Base. In Derived's function, I can access protected members of Base. E.g., I can do this.

class Base
{
protected:
    int i;
}

class Derived : class Base
{
    void process()
    {
        i = 5;
    }
}

My question is, is it possible to enforce the use of scope resolution operator when accessing base class member from derived class? The reason is that I want to make it clear in the code which variables are from the base class. The enforcement is so that I won't accidentally skip the scope resolution operator (I'm careless). I prefer not to use accessors since many members from the base class are required in the Derived class, making it tedious to code. I'm using MSVC 2010 by the way.

class Base
{
protected:
    int i;
}

class Derived : class Base
{
    void process()
    {
        Base::i = 5;   //enforce so that i=5 won't compile
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why the ... do you want to do that ? If you are not comfortable with protected members, don't use them. –  Alexandre C. Oct 8 '10 at 8:00
3  
I'd recommend reading Herb Sutter's GotW article on Encapsulation. To summarize: "there is never a good reason to write public or protected data members" –  James McNellis Oct 8 '10 at 8:02
    
How would this be better "documentation" than calling the protected members "base_i" etc...? (Ugly, but it's your mess to make ;-P). –  Tony D Oct 8 '10 at 8:53
    
@James: I think Spock might ask about members in general. Although his example is about member data, the way I read it the question would equally apply to member functions. –  sbi Oct 8 '10 at 9:49
    
You guys have a point regarding its usefulness. In the end I find that doing this isn't really useful after all. Think that I was actually concerned with identifying local variables from member variables in the Derived class, which I think using different naming styles would help. Anyway, thanks for the comments –  Spock Oct 8 '10 at 10:29

2 Answers 2

you can simulate it by introducing another scope:

class Base {
protected:
    struct Data {int i;};
    Data d_Base;
};

class Derived : class Base {
    void process() {
        d_Base.i = 5;
    }
};
share|improve this answer

You cannot do it in the base class itself, no, there is no way you could enforce that. However, I am thinking of a trick which you could do in a derived class to enforce what you want, that is, if you declare a variable with the same name i in the derived class as a member, but of type, say, MyBadType, which is just an empty type, then i in derived will refer to it and there is really nothing the user could do with it. So he will HAVE TO qualify to get the base i. But this is naturally a joke, I mean, you don't want to fatten the size of your derived class just to enforce qualified names. Your goal itself is a bit dubious.

HTH, Armen

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This would not work if the derived class actually has a valid data-member with the same name. –  Björn Pollex Oct 8 '10 at 8:09
    
If the derived class DOES have a valid data member with the same name, then the trick is already done, I mean then the user has to qualify the name to get to the base member, right? –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 8 '10 at 8:15
    
That is right, I did not think that through. –  Björn Pollex Oct 8 '10 at 8:20
    
A little hint: When responding to a comment use @username, so the addressed user gets a notification. –  Björn Pollex Oct 8 '10 at 8:22
    
@Space_C0wb0y Thanks :) –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 8 '10 at 8:25

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