Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Like many people I've been doing image preload for a long time, but not always very rationally. So I've come up with this short list of thoughts about the right way to preload images with javascript.

  • An image preload script should be executed as soon as possible. It should be placed at the top of the HTML (in the HEAD section), unlike the others scripts that go to the bottom of the BODY section.
  • It must not rely on a library (such as jQuery) because that would delay the execution.
  • CSS sprites and background-images need not be preloaded because the CSS - normally called at the top of the HTML - already does the job (this of course reduces the overall need for javascript image preload).
  • The preload script can be placed and run on every page of the site so as to be sure it is effective no matter which page the user enters the site. (But what about the overhead of running the script every time, if only to check the images are now cached?)

I'd be very interested to hear your opinions on this subject.

share|improve this question
    
I just would know why you have to use JavaScript image preload..? –  MatTheCat Oct 8 '10 at 8:31
    
Do you think it is really unnecessary in all cases? As I said, the use of css sprites reduces the need for it. But sometimes it may be useful to speed up the process by loading an image on a page that doesn't show it, having it ready for the page that will need it (more efficient than using onload event handlers). I'm only curious to hear what you think. –  Nicolas Le Thierry d'Ennequin Oct 8 '10 at 8:34
    
I'm waiting for you prove me the contrary ^^ I really don't know in which case it improves page's loading. –  MatTheCat Oct 8 '10 at 8:38
    
It's rather about improving the user experience... –  Nicolas Le Thierry d'Ennequin Oct 8 '10 at 8:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An image preload script should be executed as soon as possible. It should be placed at the top of the HTML (in the HEAD section), unlike the others scripts that go to the bottom of the BODY section.

This puts greater precedence on images that might be shown if the user does something then on images which are part of the initial page. (Unless you are trying to preload images which are part of the initial page, which would be redundant).

It must not rely on a library (such as jQuery) because that would delay the execution.

Such a delay shouldn't be significant

CSS sprites and background-images need not be preloaded because the CSS - normally called at the top of the HTML - already does the job (this of course reduces the overall need for javascript image preload).

Browsers may optimize and not load images mentioned in stylesheets if they aren't being displayed.

The preload script can be placed and run on every page of the site so as to be sure it is effective no matter which page the user enters the site. (But what about the overhead of running the script every time, if only to check the images are now cached?)

Sensible cache control headers should avoid the need to make HTTP requests to check the freshness of images, so this should be negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I'll have a serious look at cache control headers. –  Nicolas Le Thierry d'Ennequin Oct 8 '10 at 13:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.