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Is there a way in a C# static method to refer to the Type the method is defined in?

In an instance method you can determine the type by:

public void Foo()
{
    Type type = this.GetType();
}

how would it look like in a static method?

public static void Bar()
{
    Type type = ....?
}

Update: Sorry, clarification needed: I know the typeof(...) feature. I'm looking for a keyword or code that gives me the Type without explicitly referencing the class name.

Update: Besides Developer Art's answer, which does exactly what I was looking for, is there a simpler way?

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1  
Why do you want to do this? What are you going to do with this Type object once you've got it? –  AakashM Oct 8 '10 at 9:46
    
What are the intention behind the code? What the hell are you using the type information for in a static method anyway? –  Yves M. Oct 8 '10 at 10:09
    
@Yves: This has nothing to do with hell. I simply need the Type object to pass it as a parameter to a given method. Why shouldn't a Type be used in a static method? Type is not a state nor is it in any other way specific to an instance. –  chiccodoro Oct 8 '10 at 10:56
    
@AakashM: Of course at design time I know the type and can reference it explicitely, but it's for code that I copy-paste or move a lot and still it should always refer to the type that encloses it. (To be more precise, for log4net logging statements, but I'm also just curious generally.) –  chiccodoro Oct 8 '10 at 11:03
    
If it's for log4net then your question becomes close to being a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2852923/… :) –  AakashM Oct 8 '10 at 11:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Here you go:

public static void Bar()
{
  Type type = System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType;
}

Edit: updated to correct error - DeclaringType is a property.

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1  
Although this method is generic it is more costly than a simple, static 'typeof (ClassName)'. –  Paul Ruane Oct 8 '10 at 9:45
7  
The author is obviously interested in getting the type without specifying its name explicitly. –  user151323 Oct 8 '10 at 9:46
1  
Does this require a [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] decoration to prevent getting the wrong method? –  Ani Oct 8 '10 at 9:51
    
I don't think so. This might only be needed if you used the GetFrame method. –  user151323 Oct 8 '10 at 9:56
    
@Developer Art: Exactly, that's what I'm interested in. This solution looks appropriate and safe, saver than the StackTrace approach. Does that mean that there is no simpler way? No keyword, e.g.? –  chiccodoro Oct 8 '10 at 11:00
public class Foo {
   public static void Bar() {
      Type type = typeof(Foo);
   }
}

You could also use the stacktrace

public class Foo {
   public static void Bar() {
        Type type = new StackTrace().GetFrame(0).GetMethod().DeclaringType;
   }
}
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var Abuse!!! :) –  SysAdmin Oct 8 '10 at 9:50
    
no var abuse anymore :) –  m0sa Oct 8 '10 at 9:54
1  
@m0sa - I have seen instances where the optimizer omits entries from the stack trace, and if that happens the second method here will not work. See here for more info: blogs.msdn.com/b/jmstall/archive/2005/03/20/399287.aspx –  Steve Townsend Oct 8 '10 at 11:56
    
Everything was clearly identified on the right... var isn't abused if it's clear in it's intentions. 4 lines instead of 1 might be considered abuse... but var abuse? hardly –  WernerCD Oct 8 '10 at 12:55
    
@Steve thanks for the link, I was not aware of this. –  m0sa Oct 8 '10 at 15:41
class ClassA
{
    public static void Bar()
    {
        Type t = typeof(ClassA);
    }
}

Captain Obvious, I know.

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Why don't you use typeof?

public class Foo
{
  public static void Bar()
  {
    Type type = typeof(Foo);
  }
}

Or like Developer Art suggested it, you could do it using reflection, but it will be slower.

using System.Reflection;
public class Foo
{
  public static void Bar()
  {
    Type type = MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You could use

 Type t = typeof ( Program );

A very unusual way would be to use a StackTrace, taking the Type of the last frame...

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It's a bit convoluted, but I think you could also go the route of a singleton-type pattern

public class Foo
{
    private static Foo _Instance = new Foo();
    public static Type Bar()
    {
        return _Instance.GetType();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Steven, if I created a private static field which refers explicitly to the enclosing type, then I'd rather use private static Type _thisType = typeof(Foo); –  chiccodoro Oct 8 '10 at 14:01
    
That works too :) I was just throwing some alternative methods out there. If the scenerio ever came up again where you needed a static version of "this", then this approach gives you that....If the type is all you'll ever need, than any of these approaches gives you that pretty well. –  Steven Oct 8 '10 at 14:07
    
Hi Steven, sorry, I didn't read your code well enough and didn't realize that your Bar() method exactly does that, just providing the Type. I though that was "my" static method that needs the type. –  chiccodoro Oct 11 '10 at 11:56
    
Still my "proposal" would be even simpler. A one-liner good to copy and paste. If you want you can incorporate it in your answer as a 2nd variant. –  chiccodoro Oct 11 '10 at 11:56
    
@chiccodoro - I don't think I explained myself very clearly, so I apologize if I was vague. I don't disagree that what you're suggesting is simpler, and if easy access to the Type is all you'll ever need, then the static '_Instance' is probably overkill. I was just throwing this out there based on the title of the question. if you ever needed the static equivalent of a "this" for some other reason, then having something like a static _Instance provides you with that... –  Steven Oct 11 '10 at 13:11

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