Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use BDD in a very simple way, in order to minimize the amount of Java code. I want to create exactly two files, one is my story:

Given user is named "John Doe" 
And user is authenticated
When user changes his password to "a1b2c3"
Then user password equals to "a1b2c3"

Next, I create a Java class:

public class UserManipulator {
  @Given("$user is named $name")
  public User shouldExistOrBeCreated(String name) {
    User user = //...
    return user;
  }
  @Given("$user is authenticated")
  public void shouldBeLoggedIn() {
    // ...
  }
  @When("$user changes his password to $pwd")
  public void shouldChangePassword(User user, String pwd) {
    // ...
  }
  @Then("$user password equals to $pwd")
  public void shouldHaveThisPassword(User user, String pwd) {
    assertEquals(user.getPassword(), pwd);
  }
}

And that's it. I don't want to have any more files, any more unit tests. I want some BDD-framework to find my story file, parse all my Java files, and run them one by one. Is it possible to achieve?

ps. What is important here is a possible reuse of Java methods in my other stories. For example, this is the story no.2:

Given user is named "Michael Doe"   <-- reuse
When user adds $100.00 to his account
Then user account balance is $100.00
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Bryan Oakley, Holger, hoaz, Joel Mueller, SamB Oct 2 at 0:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Bryan Oakley, Holger, hoaz, Joel Mueller, SamB
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I think this is an excellent idea, so I spent a bit of time to create some mock code. Would this be something you'd be willing to use or is this "too complex"? -> pastie.org/1210819 This mock code doesn't match exactly with what you've provided/asked but it got me thinking... –  Esko Oct 10 '10 at 8:17
    
@Esko The code you created is nice, but again the idea is to separate BDD stories from Java code entirely. Stories are in plan text, and Java classes are providers of behavioral steps... –  yegor256 Oct 10 '10 at 16:29
    
I think you can revisit JBehave now. You have to write one Java class that extends JUnitStories. You then define where it should look for story files via paths, and define the step classes as well. So it doesn't do everything, but it's one file for all stories/steps. Not likely you'll get much better than that... –  Mikezx6r Jan 27 '11 at 2:52

9 Answers 9

We use Cucumber, which is a Ruby framework but by bundling JRuby into your project you can easily access your Java objects. It does mean you write your step definitions in Ruby, but it also minimises the amount of Java you write :)

The story format in Cucumber is exactly as you describe in your example, and re-use of story lines is trivial.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't have any more JUnit tests, right? All you have is .feature files and JRuby code. Am I correct? –  yegor256 Oct 11 '10 at 9:37
    
For our specs, yeah. We fire up Cucumber directly from our Ant build, and don't need to create a Java class for each test or anything like that. –  Nick Oct 11 '10 at 15:18

You want to have a look at:

Also, this presentation on BDD in Java and Groovy could be of interest.

share|improve this answer
    
@haylem JBehave doesn't allow such an approach. I have to create an instance of JUnitStory class for every story. Which is an overhead, as I see it... –  yegor256 Oct 8 '10 at 12:30
    
@Vincenzo: Sorry, I didn't understand your requirement like that. I'm actually not sure I understand. You want a framework to extrapolate and run the test from this story and this Java class over all the Java files of your project? I don't see how that's useful. –  haylem Oct 8 '10 at 12:34
    
@haylem The story itself has enough information about what I want to test and how (my scenario). I don't see why I would need to create any other classes on top of it. But in JBehave I have to create them and they are rather complex and error prone.. That's why I'm trying to find a framework which will do all this work for me, maybe on top of JBehave, why not... –  yegor256 Oct 8 '10 at 12:38
    
@Vincenzo: have a look at easyb. The syntax is even more lightweight, as it uses groovy. –  haylem Oct 8 '10 at 12:41
    
@haylem I just reviewed their presentation, thanks. Easyb is just another mechanism of unit test writing. Yes, it is more lightweight than Java+JUnit, but it's still not what I'm looking for. I want to enable my stories to reuse Java constructs, catching them just by RegEx patterns.. I will update the question now to explain better. –  yegor256 Oct 8 '10 at 12:48

The robotframework may be of interest. You can read the details in the user guide here: http://robotframework.googlecode.com/svn/tags/robotframework-2.5.4/doc/userguide/RobotFrameworkUserGuide.html#behavior-driven-style

Robotframework is written in python and new keywords can be implemented in python or jython.

There is also a thesis on the use of RF for ATDD here: http://www.niksula.cs.hut.fi/~jprantan/thesis/thesis_juha_rantanen.pdf

share|improve this answer

Not really what you are looking for, but you may want to have a look at Spock.

share|improve this answer

In newer versions of JBehave, you can use the JUnitStories class, which lets one Java class act as the runner for multiple plain text stories. Would this do what you need?

share|improve this answer

I don't think it provides the level of reuse you're looking for but also have a look at Concordion, a BDD framework similar to Fitnesse but much easier to use (specifications are written in plain text, in the form of HTML pages). And it integrates just directly with JUnit and thus also with Maven.

See also

share|improve this answer

Cucumber JVM is exactly what you are looking for. Simple steps that can be reused, works transparently with JUnit, integrates well with Spring (and many others). The only one additional file that has to be added is a class annotated with @RunWith(Cucumber.class) - one class no matter how many tests and steps you have.

share|improve this answer

jBehave or Cucumber can be used. Both of them are good.

For jbehave you can visit: http://jbehave.org/

I am using jBehave now. I know very little about Cucumber. I studied little about "Cucumber-JVM".

Guess, both of them are nice

share|improve this answer

Disclamer: I am the author of JGiven.

You could have a look at JGiven. Instead of a text file for your scenario you would write a JUnit test like this:

public class UserManipulatorTest 
       extends ScenarioTest<GivenUser, WhenPasswordChange, ThenUser> {

   @Test
   public void user_can_change_his_password() {
       given().user_is_named( "John Doe" )
          .and().user_is_authenticated(); 
       when().user_changes_his_password_to( "a1b2c3" );
       then().user_password_equals_to( "a1b2c3" );
   }
}

Then you write your step definitions in a so-called stage classes. Typically you have for each stage one class so that they are better reusable. So in your case I would define three stage classes:

public class GivenUser extends Stage<GivenUser> {
    @ProvidedScenarioState
    User user;

    public GivenUser user_is_named(String name) {
        user = //...
        return self();
    }

    public GivenUser user_is_authenticated() {
        // ...
        return self();
    }
}

public class WhenPasswordChange extends Stage<WhenPasswordChange> {
    @ExpectedScenarioState
    User user;

    public WhenPasswordChange user_changes_his_password_to(String pwd) {
        // ...
        return self();
    } 
}

public class ThenUser extends Stage<ThenUser> {
    @ExpectedScenarioState
    User user;

    public ThenUser user_password_equals_to(String pwd) {
        assertEquals(user.getPassword(), pwd);
        return self();
    }
}

Now you can reuse these stage classes in other scenarios. In your example you could reuse the GivenUser stage class and you would define the new stage classes WhenBalanceChange and ThenBalance:

public class BalanceTest 
    extends ScenarioTest<GivenUser, WhenBalanceChange, ThenBalance> {

    @Test
    public void user_can_add_balance_to_his_account() {
        given().user_is_named("Michael Doe");
        when().user_adds_$_to_his_account("$100.00");
        then().user_account_balance_is("$100.00");
    }
}

Note that in JGiven the $ character in a method name is a placeholder for the method argument and will be replaced by it in the generated report.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.