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The numpy docs recommend using array instead of matrix for working with matrices. However, unlike octave (which I was using till recently), * doesn't perform matrix multiplication, you need to use the function matrixmultipy(). I feel this makes the code very unreadable.

Does anybody share my views, and has found a solution?

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8  
You're asking for opinions and not a question. Is there something more specific we could help you with or perhaps guide you in making it more readable? –  wheaties Oct 8 '10 at 12:59
2  
Actually the docs recommend using matrix if you do linear algebra and don't wan't to use multiply() so whats the problem? –  Matti Pastell Oct 8 '10 at 13:13
    
I haven't gone through the docs in detail. Just curious, what advantages do arrays offer over the matrix class? I found that arrays do not differentiate between rows and columns. Is it because arrays are supposed to be thought of as tensors rather than matrices? As Joe pointed out, the fact that matrix class is 2-dim is quite limiting. What's the thinking behind this kind of design, as in, why not have a single matrix class like matlab/octave? –  elexhobby Oct 10 '10 at 16:23

7 Answers 7

The main reason to avoid using the matrix class is that a) it's inherently 2-dimensional, and b) there's additional overhead compared to a "normal" numpy array. If all you're doing is linear algebra, then by all means, feel free to use the matrix class... Personally I find it more trouble than it's worth, though.

For arrays, use dot instead of matrixmultiply.

E.g.

import numpy as np
x = np.arange(9).reshape((3,3))
y = np.arange(3)

print np.dot(x,y)

Or in newer versions of numpy, simply use x.dot(y)

Personally, I find it much more readable than the * operator implying matrix multiplication...

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3  
Its unreadable when you have a stack of multiplications, for instance x'*A'*A*x. –  elexhobby Oct 19 '10 at 8:15
8  
@elexhobby - x.T.dot(A.T).dot(A).dot(x) isn't that unreadable, i.m.o. To each his own, though. If you're primarily doing matrix multiplication, then by all means, use numpy.matrix! –  Joe Kington Oct 19 '10 at 13:32
2  
By the way, why is matrix multiplication called "dot"? In what sense is it a dot product? –  amcnabb Mar 14 '13 at 18:13
4  
@amcnabb - Matrix multiplication is sometimes referred to as a "dot product" in textbooks (in those books, the dot product you're thinking of is called a "scalar product" or "scalar dot product"). The scalar dot product is just matrix multiplication of two vectors, after all, so using "dot" to mean matrix multiplication in general isn't much of a stretch. That particular notation seems (?) more common in engineering and science texts than in mathematics, at least in my experience. Its prevalence in numpy is mostly because numpy.matrixmultiply is tough to type. –  Joe Kington Mar 15 '13 at 0:00
4  
@amcnabb the point is that dot generalizes to arbitrary dimensionality without ambiguity. It is this that makes numpy.dot equivalent to matrix multiplication. If you really dislike the notation, use the matrix class. –  Henry Gomersall Apr 21 '13 at 7:35

the key things to know for operations on NumPy arrays versus operations on NumPy matrices are:

  • NumPy matrix is a subclass of NumPy array

  • NumPy array operations are element-wise (once broadcasting is accounted for)

  • NumPy matrix operations follow the ordinary rules of linear algebra

some code snippets:

>>> from numpy import linalg as LA

>>> import numpy as NP

>>> a1 = NP.matrix("4 3 5; 6 7 8; 1 3 13; 7 21 9")
>>> a1
matrix([[ 4,  3,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8],
        [ 1,  3, 13],
        [ 7, 21,  9]])

>>> a2 = NP.matrix("7 8 15; 5 3 11; 7 4 9; 6 15 4")
>>> a2
matrix([[ 7,  8, 15],
        [ 5,  3, 11],
        [ 7,  4,  9],
        [ 6, 15,  4]])

>>> a1.shape
(4, 3)
>>> a2.shape
(4, 3)
>>> a2t = a2.T
>>> a2t.shape
(3, 4)

>>> a1 * a2t     # same as NP.dot(a1, a2t) 
matrix([[127,  84,  85,  89],
        [218, 139, 142, 173],
        [226, 157, 136, 103],
        [352, 197, 214, 393]])

but this operations fails if these two NumPy matrices are converted to arrays:

>>> a1 = NP.array(a1)
>>> a2t = NP.array(a2t)

>>> a1 * a2t
Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "<pyshell#277>", line 1, in <module>
   a1 * a2t
   ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (4,3) (3,4) 

however, using the NP.dot syntax works with arrays; this operations works like matrix multiplication:

>> NP.dot(a1, a2t)
array([[127,  84,  85,  89],
       [218, 139, 142, 173],
       [226, 157, 136, 103],
       [352, 197, 214, 393]])

so do you ever need a NumPy matrix? ie, will a NumPy array suffice for linear algebra computation (provided you know the correct syntax, ie, NP.dot)?

the rule seems to be that if the arguments (arrays) have shapes (m x n) compatible with the a given linear algebra operation, then you are ok, otherwise, NumPy throws.

the only exception i have come across (there are likely others) is calculating matrix inverse.

below are snippets in which i have called a pure linear algebra operation (in fact, from Numpy's Linear Algebra module) and passed in a NumPy array

determinant of an array:

>>> m = NP.random.randint(0, 10, 16).reshape(4, 4)
>>> m
array([[6, 2, 5, 2],
       [8, 5, 1, 6],
       [5, 9, 7, 5],
       [0, 5, 6, 7]])

>>> type(m)
<type 'numpy.ndarray'>

>>> md = LA.det(m)
>>> md
1772.9999999999995

eigenvectors/eigenvalue pairs:

>>> LA.eig(m)
(array([ 19.703+0.j   ,   0.097+4.198j,   0.097-4.198j,   5.103+0.j   ]), 
array([[-0.374+0.j   , -0.091+0.278j, -0.091-0.278j, -0.574+0.j   ],
       [-0.446+0.j   ,  0.671+0.j   ,  0.671+0.j   , -0.084+0.j   ],
       [-0.654+0.j   , -0.239-0.476j, -0.239+0.476j, -0.181+0.j   ],
       [-0.484+0.j   , -0.387+0.178j, -0.387-0.178j,  0.794+0.j   ]]))

matrix norm:

>>>> LA.norm(m)
22.0227

qr factorization:

>>> LA.qr(a1)
(array([[ 0.5,  0.5,  0.5],
        [ 0.5,  0.5, -0.5],
        [ 0.5, -0.5,  0.5],
        [ 0.5, -0.5, -0.5]]), 
 array([[ 6.,  6.,  6.],
        [ 0.,  0.,  0.],
        [ 0.,  0.,  0.]]))

matrix rank:

>>> m = NP.random.rand(40).reshape(8, 5)
>>> m
array([[ 0.545,  0.459,  0.601,  0.34 ,  0.778],
       [ 0.799,  0.047,  0.699,  0.907,  0.381],
       [ 0.004,  0.136,  0.819,  0.647,  0.892],
       [ 0.062,  0.389,  0.183,  0.289,  0.809],
       [ 0.539,  0.213,  0.805,  0.61 ,  0.677],
       [ 0.269,  0.071,  0.377,  0.25 ,  0.692],
       [ 0.274,  0.206,  0.655,  0.062,  0.229],
       [ 0.397,  0.115,  0.083,  0.19 ,  0.701]])
>>> LA.matrix_rank(m)
5

matrix condition:

>>> a1 = NP.random.randint(1, 10, 12).reshape(4, 3)
>>> LA.cond(a1)
5.7093446189400954

inversion requires a NumPy matrix though:

>>> a1 = NP.matrix(a1)
>>> type(a1)
<class 'numpy.matrixlib.defmatrix.matrix'>

>>> a1.I
matrix([[ 0.028,  0.028,  0.028,  0.028],
        [ 0.028,  0.028,  0.028,  0.028],
        [ 0.028,  0.028,  0.028,  0.028]])
>>> a1 = NP.array(a1)
>>> a1.I

Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "<pyshell#230>", line 1, in <module>
   a1.I
   AttributeError: 'numpy.ndarray' object has no attribute 'I'

but the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse seems to works just fine

>>> LA.pinv(m)
matrix([[ 0.314,  0.407, -1.008, -0.553,  0.131,  0.373,  0.217,  0.785],
        [ 1.393,  0.084, -0.605,  1.777, -0.054, -1.658,  0.069, -1.203],
        [-0.042, -0.355,  0.494, -0.729,  0.292,  0.252,  1.079, -0.432],
        [-0.18 ,  1.068,  0.396,  0.895, -0.003, -0.896, -1.115, -0.666],
        [-0.224, -0.479,  0.303, -0.079, -0.066,  0.872, -0.175,  0.901]])

>>> m = NP.array(m)

>>> LA.pinv(m)
array([[ 0.314,  0.407, -1.008, -0.553,  0.131,  0.373,  0.217,  0.785],
       [ 1.393,  0.084, -0.605,  1.777, -0.054, -1.658,  0.069, -1.203],
       [-0.042, -0.355,  0.494, -0.729,  0.292,  0.252,  1.079, -0.432],
       [-0.18 ,  1.068,  0.396,  0.895, -0.003, -0.896, -1.115, -0.666],
       [-0.224, -0.479,  0.303, -0.079, -0.066,  0.872, -0.175,  0.901]])
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Very nice reference! Thanks! –  RunHolt Apr 9 at 12:42

It should be same, check here http://www.scipy.org/NumPy_for_Matlab_Users (think of MATLAB as Octave clone)

Do you really have matrix type or just list of lists from python?;

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19  
Thumbs up for "think of MATLAB as Octave clone!" –  Paolo Jul 4 '12 at 13:08

There is a situation where the dot operator will give different answers when dealing with arrays as with dealing with matrices. For example, suppose the following:

>>> a=numpy.array([1, 2, 3])
>>> b=numpy.array([1, 2, 3])

Lets convert them into matrices:

>>> am=numpy.mat(a)
>>> bm=numpy.mat(b)

Now, we can see a different output for the two cases:

>>> print numpy.dot(a.T, b)
14
>>> print am.T*bm
[[1.  2.  3.]
 [2.  4.  6.]
 [3.  6.  9.]]
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This trick could be what you are looking for. It is a kind of simple operator overload.

You can then use something like the suggested Infix class like this:

a = np.random.rand(3,4)
b = np.random.rand(4,3)
x = Infix(lambda x,y: np.dot(x,y))
c = a |x| b
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Reference from http://docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/tutorial/linalg.html

..., the use of the numpy.matrix class is discouraged, since it adds nothing that cannot be accomplished with 2D numpy.ndarray objects, and may lead to a confusion of which class is being used. For example,

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from scipy import linalg
>>> A = np.array([[1,2],[3,4]])
>>> A
    array([[1, 2],
           [3, 4]])
>>> linalg.inv(A)
array([[-2. ,  1. ],
      [ 1.5, -0.5]])
>>> b = np.array([[5,6]]) #2D array
>>> b
array([[5, 6]])
>>> b.T
array([[5],
      [6]])
>>> A*b #not matrix multiplication!
array([[ 5, 12],
      [15, 24]])
>>> A.dot(b.T) #matrix multiplication
array([[17],
      [39]])
>>> b = np.array([5,6]) #1D array
>>> b
array([5, 6])
>>> b.T  #not matrix transpose!
array([5, 6])
>>> A.dot(b)  #does not matter for multiplication
array([17, 39])

scipy.linalg operations can be applied equally to numpy.matrix or to 2D numpy.ndarray objects.

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Python 3.5 is finally getting a matrix multiplication operator. The syntax will be a @ b.

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Thanks! Yay, glad to see that I'm not the only one who feels that the current notation is unreadable. –  elexhobby Aug 25 at 17:32

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