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After learning a bit of how LLVM work I'm really excited about how portable low-level code can be generated and how modular this 'thing' is built.

But I discovered today the existence of C-- that seems to share some concepts with LLVM.

So I'm looking for some information helping me understand the main differences between these two projects... and why both exist.

For me LLVM looks a bit like the ultimate Swiss Army knife for compiler infrastructure, and C-- looks far less advanced.

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apparently, you can' have - in a tag. cminusminus it is. –  aaronasterling Oct 8 '10 at 14:29
    
thanks for correction :-) –  Alois Cochard Oct 8 '10 at 14:30
    
I don't know about quality of implementation, but LLVM seems to have a lot more action on it's mailing lists. –  sharth Oct 8 '10 at 14:31
    
using 'mm' is a common way to express minus minus. i believe it's used as a joke for many c++ bindings, such as glibmm. 'glib--'. i don't imagine newcomers are going to know to search for cmm tho. –  Matt Joiner Oct 8 '10 at 14:32
    
@matt also, cmm already exists as a completely different language than c--. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Oct 11 '10 at 16:10
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1 Answer

up vote 31 down vote accepted

They differ in how expressive the low level machine type system is.

The LLVM machine is pretty expressive, but the C-- machine puts a lot of responsibility on the language front end, quoting from the C-- FAQ: "simply, C-- has no high-level types---it does not even distinguish floating-point variables from integer variables. This model gives the front end total control of representation and type system"

Also visually they look a lot different. C-- looks a lot like C, LLVM looks a lot like assembler.

Pragmatically, LLVM has a lot more momentum right now. It has a JIT compiler, Apple is using it for 3D pipeline things and people are using it to connect to GCC and all sorts of weird and wonderful things. Someone called it "almost absurdly easy to work with".

On the other hand C-- is much smaller and probably easier to entirely comprehend. (I imagine a normal person with some dedication can fully understand all aspects of it.)

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So, if I understand correctly the main difference is the abstraction level of the intermediate representation used by theses compiler. thanks ! –  Alois Cochard Oct 8 '10 at 15:44
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@Alois Cochard, that is how it seemed to me. I am no compiler expert, I just play one on Stack Overflow. :-) –  Prof. Falken Oct 8 '10 at 20:12
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