Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Yet another in my series of questions regarding constructors in Delphi.

i have a base class that has has the virtual constructor:

TComputer = class(TObject)
public
    constructor Create(Teapot: Integer); virtual;
end;

The constructor is virtual for the times that someone needs to call

var
   computerClass: class of TComputer;
   computer: TComputer;
begin     
   computer := computerClass.Create(nTeapot);

The constructor is overridden in descendants:

TCellPhone = class(TComputer) 
public
   constructor Create(Teapot: Integer); override;
end;

TiPhone = class(TCellPhone ) 
public
   constructor Create(Teapot: Integer); override;
end;

Where TCellPhone and TiPhone descendants each have their opportunity to do their own initialization (of members not included for readability).

But now i add an overloaded constructor to some ancestor:

TCellPhone = class(TComputer) 
public
   constructor Create(Teapot: Integer); override; overload;
   constructor Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string); overload;
end;

The alternate constructor in TCellPhone calls the other virtual constructor, so it always gets the proper overridden behaviour:

constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string);
begin
   TCellPhone.Create(Teapot); //call sibling virtual constructor

   FHandle := Handle;
end;

The problem is that the descendant, overridden, constructor is never called. The actual stack trace chain of calls is:

phone := TiPhone.Create(37, 'spout')
   constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string)
      constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer)
         constructor TComputer.Create(Teapot: Integer)
            TObject.Create

The sibling call to TCellPhone.Create(int), which is virtual, should have called the descendant, overridden, method in TiPhone:

phone := TiPhone.Create(37, 'spout')
   constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string)
      constructor TiPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer)
         constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer)
            constructor TComputer.Create(Teapot: Integer)
               TObject.Create

So it seems that attempts to use a sibling virtual constructor is Delphi do not work as expected.

Is it then a bad idea for one constructor to use another? Is the design intention that code in overloaded constructors be copy-paste versions of each other?

i notice in .NET that some constructors chain to each other:

public Bitmap(int width, int height) : this(width, height, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb) {}

public Bitmap(int width, int height, PixelFormat format) {...}

This only seems to be a problem if:

  • a constructor is virtual
  • you overload the constructors

Is the rule that you cannot have one constructor overload another?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Errr..

constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string);
begin
   TCellPhone.Create(Teapot); //call sibling virtual constructor

   FHandle := Handle;
end;

That should be:

constructor TCellPhone.Create(Teapot: Integer; Handle: string);
begin
   Create(Teapot); //call sibling virtual constructor

   FHandle := Handle;
end;

You were just creating a new TCellphone instance and not calling the other Create method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I was right about to answer this, but you beat me to it. –  Mason Wheeler Oct 8 '10 at 16:28
    
+1, leaking a CellPhone! –  Sertac Akyuz Oct 8 '10 at 16:29
    
Well thank you. i just thought that inherited Create calls the ancestor - i must have to have something to indicate me. :\ –  Ian Boyd Oct 8 '10 at 17:54
1  
The thing that indicates me is Self, @Ian: Self.Create(Teapot). As usual, Self is implied; you needn't mention it explicitly, as The_Fox demonstrates here. –  Rob Kennedy Oct 8 '10 at 20:07
    
@Ian, call inherited Create(Teapot) if you want to execute the parent's constructor. –  Marcus Adams Oct 8 '10 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.