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       a=[1,3,6,7,1,2]

Which is the best sorting technique to sort the following array and if there are duplicates how to handle them. Also which is the best sorting technique of all....

 void BubbleSort(int a[], int array_size)
 {
 int i, j, temp;
 for (i = 0; i < (array_size - 1); ++i)
 {
      for (j = 0; j < array_size - 1 - i; ++j )
      {
           if (a[j] > a[j+1])
           {
                temp = a[j+1];
                a[j+1] = a[j];
                a[j] = temp;
           }
      }
 }
 }   
share|improve this question
1  
See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_algorithm – Donotalo Oct 8 '10 at 20:13
2  
There is no "best sorting technique of all", it depends on the size of your data and if it is somewhat sorted at the beginning. I'd suggest you to read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and the whole Wikipedia article as well. – schnaader Oct 8 '10 at 20:13
    
"best" depends on the data and other constraints: memory, speed, how mis sorted to start. quicksort is a great compromise among those. bubble sort is a best for small memory. What do you want to accomplish? – dawg Oct 8 '10 at 20:16
    
The best (if best == fastest) sorting technique would be to get the data such that it's already sorted. – Nick T Oct 8 '10 at 20:17
    
"following array" = "preceding array"? If yes, the fastest is to write it down sorted. Seriously, I do this in generated code. – Peter G. Oct 8 '10 at 20:41
up vote 19 down vote accepted

In C, you can use the built in qsort command:

int compare( const void* a, const void* b)
{
     int int_a = * ( (int*) a );
     int int_b = * ( (int*) b );

     if ( int_a == int_b ) return 0;
     else if ( int_a < int_b ) return -1;
     else return 1;
}

qsort( a, 6, sizeof(int), compare )

see: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/qsort/


To answer the second part of your question: an optimal (comparison based) sorting algorithm is one that runs with O(n log(n)) comparisons. There are several that have this property (including quick sort, merge sort, heap sort, etc.), but which one to use depends on your use case.

As a side note, you can sometime do better than O(n log(n)) if you know something about your data - see the wikipedia article on Radix Sort

share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't a compare function usually return 0 if they're equal? And why do you create int_a and int_b then never use them? – Nick T Oct 8 '10 at 20:15
    
I accidentally posted before I had finished typing it up. – Alex Reece Oct 8 '10 at 20:17
3  
@Alex: if you want it fast, at least provide a decent compare function! qsort does not need the returned values to be -1, 0, 1, but "any negative number", 0, "any positive number", hence you just have to do return *((int*)a)-*((int*)b); which is much faster than your proposal. – kriss Oct 8 '10 at 21:02
1  
@kriss: your comparison isn't well-defined in case of integer overflow; therefore, one often sees things like return (a > b) - (a < b) – Christoph Oct 8 '10 at 22:04
1  
@R..: big O does not implies worst case, QuickSort is O(n log n) on average and naive implementation can be changed it such a way it behave the same in worst case (just need a pivot choice from more values). Change is small enough that the modified version is usually still called QuickSort. – kriss Oct 9 '10 at 15:49

In your particular case the fastest sort is probably the one described in this answer. It is exactly optimized for an array of 6 ints and uses sorting networks. It is 20 times (measured on x86) faster than library qsort. Sorting networks are optimal for sort of fixed length arrays. As they are a fixed sequence of instructions they can even be implemented easily by hardware.

Generally speaking there is many sorting algorithms optimized for some specialized case. The general purpose algorithms like heap sort or quick sort are optimized for in place sorting of an array of items. They yield a complexity of O(n.log(n)), n being the number of items to sort.

The library function qsort() is very well coded and efficient in terms of complexity, but uses a call to some comparizon function provided by user, and this call has a quite high cost.

For sorting very large amount of datas algorithms have also to take care of swapping of data to and from disk, this is the kind of sorts implemented in databases and your best bet if you have such needs is to put datas in some database and use the built in sort.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for sorting networks – R.. Oct 9 '10 at 3:25

Depends

It depends on various things. But in general algorithms using a Divide-and-Conquer / dichotomic approach will perform well for sorting problems as they present interesting average-case complexities.

Basics

To understand which algorithms work best, you will need basic knowledge of algorithms complexity and big-O notation, so you can understand how they rate in terms of average case, best case and worst case scenarios. If required, you'd also have to pay attention to the sorting algorithm's stability.

For instance, usually an efficient algorithm is quicksort. However, if you give quicksort a perfectly inverted list, then it will perform poorly (a simple selection sort will perform better in that case!). Shell-sort would also usually be a good complement to quicksort if you perform a pre-analysis of your list.

Have a look at the following, for "advanced searches" using divide and conquer approaches:

And these more straighforward algorithms for less complex ones:

Further

The above are the usual suspects when getting started, but there are countless others.

As pointed out by R. in the comments and by kriss in his answer, you may want to have a look at HeapSort, which provides a theoretically better sorting complexity than a quicksort (but will won't often fare better in practical settings). There are also variants and hybrid algorithms (e.g. TimSort).

share|improve this answer
    
If you provide a perfectly inverted list to quicksort it will degenerate only in the most naive implementation (allways take head of the list as pivot) and even then it won't be worse that BubbleSort. The naive Quicksort would also perform poorly with an already sorted list. But very simple changes to the algorithm are enough to avoid the problem (extract several numbers from the list as potential pivot and choose median as pivot). – kriss Oct 8 '10 at 20:56
    
@kriss: Correct. But this is a CS-learning question, and so I just talk about the theoretical and basic implementation of each of these approaches. Obviously you can tweak algorithms and minimize these side-effects, but as the OP is asking about general sorting issues, I think it's more in-line to pinpoint these issues. – haylem Oct 8 '10 at 23:33
    
@haylem: it's indeed probably a learning question, but the risk speaking about naive implementations is for the reader to believe that the library call qsort is a naive implementation of QuickSort, which it is not, and would degenerate on sorted data set. If I remember correctly it is not even a QuickSort in most implementations. – kriss Oct 9 '10 at 2:41
    
You left out heap sort, which is quite arguably the ideal sort (O(1) space and O(n log n) time). – R.. Oct 9 '10 at 3:24
    
@kriss: Thanks for the corrections. – haylem Oct 9 '10 at 9:58

I'd like to make some changes: In C, you can use the built in qsort command:

int compare( const void* a, const void* b)
{
   int int_a = * ( (int*) a );
   int int_b = * ( (int*) b );

   // an easy expression for comparing
   return (int_a > int_b) - (int_a < int_b);
}

qsort( a, 6, sizeof(int), compare )
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