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I am trying to parse some files that have a bitwise flag column. There are 11 bits in this flag and I need to find out, for each row in the files, what is the value of the 5th bit (1-based).

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You need to provide more information. How are the bits encoded into this file? Is it ASCII hex? Raw binary? – Amardeep AC9MF Oct 8 '10 at 21:13
    
ASCII. The bits are encoded as a number (e.g., the first 3 rows have: 0, 4 and 16). – Ron Gejman Oct 8 '10 at 21:14
    
possible duplicate of How to check my byte flag? – Kristopher Johnson Oct 8 '10 at 21:32
up vote 6 down vote accepted
if (flags & 0x10) ....

how did I know that mask (0x10)

here are 8 bits

0b00000000

here is the fifth one starting from one (from the right)

  87654321        
0b00010000

and in hex that is

0x10
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How do you calculate that the 5th flag is 0x10? – Ron Gejman Oct 8 '10 at 21:14
1  
Because the bits are powers of two: 0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08, 0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80. Just a fundamental property of the binary number system, each bit is twice the value of the previous one. – Ben Voigt Oct 8 '10 at 21:18
    
Oh, obviously. Thanks! – Ron Gejman Oct 8 '10 at 21:19

May be overkill for small number of flags, but I find easier to manipulate bits using std::bitset.

First, "construct" a bitset of 11 bits from the flags.

std::bitset< 11 > flags_bitset( flags );

Then, "test" the fifth bit

if( flags_bitset.test( 4 ) {  // 4, because indexing is 0 based.
    /* something */
}

See: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/bitset/test/

For doing by hand, try

const uint32_t mask = 1U << 4;  // '1' in fifth bit and rest '0' 
if( flag & mask ) { .. }
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