Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this seems odd to me:

if(customerList.Count > 0)
{
   if(typeof(customerList[0]).IsReferenceType)
   {
      // do what I want
   }
}

How would you do it?

share|improve this question
    
Can you make the question clear? What do you want to actually do? –  Ravi Gummadi Oct 8 '10 at 21:39
    
see my title question :) There is a question... –  Elisa Oct 8 '10 at 21:44
    
Still not very clear. Please edit the question so that it contains the crucial information that clarifies why the existing answers are insufficient. –  Timwi Oct 8 '10 at 21:50
    
Hi this seems odd to me: "How would you do it?" It doesn't seem like a question that explains exactly what you are asking... –  WernerCD Oct 8 '10 at 22:50
add comment

4 Answers

  1. To determine whether the first item in a list is an object of a reference type:

    bool isReferenceType = !(customerList[0] is ValueType);
    
  2. To determine whether a list is a List<T> for some T that is a reference type:

    var listType = customerList.GetType();
    if (!listType.IsGeneric || listType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() != typeof(List<>))
        // It’s not a List<T>
        return null;
    return !listType.GetGenericArguments()[0].IsValueType;
    
share|improve this answer
    
The most Exception I got because the customerList is empty and there is no index... :P –  Elisa Oct 8 '10 at 21:52
    
How could I retrieve the isReferenceType when the List has no objects? but List<T> says its of type T like Customer. Actually I do not add a customer Object to find out my List takes customers of type Customer... –  Elisa Oct 8 '10 at 21:54
    
@Lisa: You’re probably looking for the second solution in my answer. (It’s still not very clear though. Why can’t you just say what you’ve got and what you need?) –  Timwi Oct 8 '10 at 22:00
add comment

You are probably trying to determine the actual type of the generic parameter of a generic collection. Like determining at runtime what is a T of a particular List<T>. Do this:

Type collectionType = typeof(customerList);
Type parameterType = collectionType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
bool isReference = !parameterType.IsValueType;
share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that a List<structImplementingIEnumerator> will behave differently from a List<IEnumerator> which holds instances of structImplementingIEnumerator. What matters is whether the list encapsulates items, or references to items. If the list encapsulates references to items, it doesn't matter much whether those items themselves derive from ValueType--they'll behave like class objects in just about every way except for a likely-broken implementation of Equals. –  supercat Oct 5 '12 at 17:19
add comment
bool isReferenceType = !(customerList[0] is ValueType);

EDIT

Or are you looking for something like:

bool listIsOfReferenceTypeObjects = !myList.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0].IsValueType;
share|improve this answer
    
What do you guys think why I did IF(customerList.Count > 0) ... –  Elisa Oct 8 '10 at 21:51
    
Do I really need to tell not accessing List`s index 0 when the list.Count is zero? –  Elisa Oct 8 '10 at 22:00
add comment

ok that worked and I get no exception, when the customerList is empty.

Type collectionType = customerList.GetType();
   Type parameterType = collectionType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
   bool isReference = !parameterType.IsValueType;

@Adesit you get a point because your sample was right except the first line :P

share|improve this answer
1  
this is precisely identical to the second point in my answer, except that mine doesn’t crash when it’s not a generic type. –  Timwi Oct 8 '10 at 22:57
    
@Timwi Hm you edited your solution, maybe I haven`t read it. I just need to know wether the 'T' of a List is a value type (int) or reference type (custom class). On my side nothing crashes. –  Elisa Oct 9 '10 at 20:08
    
Of course it crashes! Try passing in anything that isn’t a generic type, e.g. a string... –  Timwi Oct 10 '10 at 7:22
    
I havent checked your suggestion yet because somehow I feel we mean different things...: I will make an example. The user could plug a List<Customer> (Reference type) to my DataSource or a List<int> (Value type). I want to check for those types because if he plugs a List<int> I will throw an exception, because only a Reference type is allowed having a property which can be again a value type. –  Elisa Oct 10 '10 at 20:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.