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In PHP, you can do...

range(1, 3); // Array(1, 2, 3)
range("A", "C"); // Array("A", "B", "C")

That is, there is a function that lets you get a range of numbers or characters by passing the upper and lower bounds.

Is there anything built-in to JavaScript natively for this? If not, how would I implement it?

share|improve this question
1  
Prototype.js has the $R function, but other than that I don't really think so. – Yi Jiang Oct 9 '10 at 2:42
    
This (related) question has some excellent answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/6299500/… – btk Feb 25 '15 at 14:47
    
Array.from("ABC") //['A', 'B', 'C'] This is the closest thing I can find for the second part of the question. – Andrew_1510 May 16 at 1:51
    
@Andrew_1510 You could use split("") there also – alex May 22 at 17:46
    
When lover bound is zero this oneliner: Array.apply(null, { length: 10 }).map(eval.call, Number) – csharpfolk Jul 25 at 16:32

32 Answers 32

Use the underscore.js _.range() function.

_.range(10);
=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
_.range(1, 11);
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
_.range(0, 30, 5);
=> [0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25]
_.range(0, -10, -1);
=> [0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9]
_.range(0);
=> []

Or without a library:

Array.apply(null, Array(5)).map(function (_, i) {return i;});
=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

ES6 version

[...Array(5).keys()];
=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

console.log([...Array(5).keys()]);

(ES6 credit to nils petersohn and other commenters)

share|improve this answer
46  
Because if it's useful anywhere it is probably useful in JS. (JS can do functional programming type stuff, which can benefit from a range(0 statement. That and a thousand other reasons it might be useful in some semirare case) – Lodewijk May 18 '13 at 19:47
1  
Useful Lodash function, but does not answer the second part of this question: how to create a character range. – amergin Oct 13 '15 at 12:59
2  
Any idea why simply using (new Array(5)).map(function (value, index) { return index; }) wouldn't work? This returns [undefined × 5] for me in Chrome DevTools. – Lewis Dec 15 '15 at 21:52
2  
@Lewis Because an array defined with that has empty slots that won't be iterated over with map() or one of its friends. – alex Dec 15 '15 at 23:09
7  
Array.from(Array(5).keys()) – nils petersohn Apr 15 at 10:18
up vote 44 down vote accepted

It works for characters and numbers, going forwards or backwards with an optional step.

var range = function(start, end, step) {
    var range = [];
    var typeofStart = typeof start;
    var typeofEnd = typeof end;

    if (step === 0) {
        throw TypeError("Step cannot be zero.");
    }

    if (typeofStart == "undefined" || typeofEnd == "undefined") {
        throw TypeError("Must pass start and end arguments.");
    } else if (typeofStart != typeofEnd) {
        throw TypeError("Start and end arguments must be of same type.");
    }

    typeof step == "undefined" && (step = 1);

    if (end < start) {
        step = -step;
    }

    if (typeofStart == "number") {

        while (step > 0 ? end >= start : end <= start) {
            range.push(start);
            start += step;
        }

    } else if (typeofStart == "string") {

        if (start.length != 1 || end.length != 1) {
            throw TypeError("Only strings with one character are supported.");
        }

        start = start.charCodeAt(0);
        end = end.charCodeAt(0);

        while (step > 0 ? end >= start : end <= start) {
            range.push(String.fromCharCode(start));
            start += step;
        }

    } else {
        throw TypeError("Only string and number types are supported");
    }

    return range;

}

jsFiddle.

If augmenting native types is your thing, then assign it to Array.range.

share|improve this answer

Here's my 2 cents:

    function range(start, count) {
      return Array.apply(0, Array(count))
        .map(function (element, index) { 
          return index + start;  
      });
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent use of high order functions. – Farzad YZ May 18 at 10:19

For numbers you can soon use the ES6 array feature. Which currently only works in Firefox.

Array.from(new Array(20), (x,i) => i)

Would create an array from 0 to 19. Lower and upper bounds can be added for example by

Array.from(new Array(20), (x,i) => i + *lowerBound*)

An article describing it more precise: http://www.2ality.com/2014/05/es6-array-methods.html

share|improve this answer
    
Works in Chrome too – Kelvin Oct 8 '15 at 16:13
12  
The first example can even be simplified to [...Array(20).keys()] – Delapouite Nov 20 '15 at 17:39
6  
Slightly more succinct than the Array.from() method, and faster than both: Array(20).fill().map((_, i) => i) – Stu Cox Feb 20 at 8:34
1  
@Delapouite Awesome! You should make that a separate answer, and I'll vote for it! It's also the perfect answer to this duplicate. – jib Apr 29 at 23:12
    
@Delapouite @jib And this as well: Array.from({length: end - start}, (v, k) => k + start) – Aditya Singh May 15 at 7:11
Array.range= function(a, b, step){
    var A= [];
    if(typeof a== 'number'){
        A[0]= a;
        step= step || 1;
        while(a+step<= b){
            A[A.length]= a+= step;
        }
    }
    else{
        var s= 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz';
        if(a=== a.toUpperCase()){
            b=b.toUpperCase();
            s= s.toUpperCase();
        }
        s= s.substring(s.indexOf(a), s.indexOf(b)+ 1);
        A= s.split('');        
    }
    return A;
}


    Array.range(0,10);
    // [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

    Array.range(-100,100,20);
    // [-100,-80,-60,-40,-20,0,20,40,60,80,100]

    Array.range('A','F');
    // ['A','B','C','D','E','F')

    Array.range('m','r');
    // ['m','n','o','p','q','r']
share|improve this answer

The standard Javascript doesn't have a built-in function to generate ranges. Several javascript frameworks add support for such features, including Prototype.js.

If you'd like to double-check, the definitive resource is the ECMA-262 Standard.

share|improve this answer

simple range function:

function range(start, stop, step){
  var a=[start], b=start;
  while(b<stop){b+=step;a.push(b)}
  return a;
};
share|improve this answer
4  
+1 Not what OP asked for, but it's what I wanted. Thanks. – Andrew Lundin Jun 17 '13 at 3:40
    
PLUS UNO for usable and readable. Best code snippet I've seen in a long time. – monsto Dec 7 '15 at 17:26

simple and handy function to do the trick based on bencmdonald's answer

function range(start, end, step, offset) { return Array.apply(null, Array((Math.abs(end - start) + ((offset||0)*2))/(step||1)+1)) .map(function(_, i) { return start < end ? i*(step||1) + start - (offset||0) :  (start - (i*(step||1))) + (offset||0) }) }    

here is how to use it

range (Start, End, Step=1, Offset=0);

  • inclusive - forward range(5,10) // [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
  • inclusive - backward range(10,5) // [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5]
  • step - backward range(10,2,2) // [10, 8, 6, 4, 2]
  • exclusive - forward range(5,10,0,-1) // [6, 7, 8, 9] not 5,10 themselves
  • offset - expand range(5,10,0,1) // [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11]
  • offset - shrink range(5,10,0,-2) // [7, 8]
  • step - expand range(10,0,2,2) // [12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0, -2]

hope you find it useful.

share|improve this answer
2  
Handy, most certainly. Simple? I beg to differ; regardless that you make it a one liner. Coming from Python this is a shock. – PascalvKooten Mar 2 at 16:02
    
@PascalvKooten, yeah of course it would have been great if there was built-in method for that like python I guess, but this was the simplest one I could come by. And it has proven to be handy in my projects. – azerafati Mar 3 at 7:02
1  
I ended up using it anyway... – PascalvKooten Mar 3 at 12:56

Using Harmony spread operator and arrow functions:

var range = (start, end) => [...Array(end - start + 1)].map((_, i) => start + i);

Example:

range(10, 15);
[ 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 ]
share|improve this answer
    
that's the best answer! – user3117400 Dec 20 '15 at 9:25
var range = (l,r) => new Array(r - l).fill().map((_,k) => k + l);
share|improve this answer
    
What's the _? – nikk wong Apr 13 at 18:41
    
@nikkwong, the _ is just a name of argument in the mapping callback. You know, in some languages you would use the _ as a name to point out that the variable is not used. – Artur Klesun Apr 13 at 19:34
    
Here though, _ isn't passed through the arguments to range. Why not? – nikk wong Apr 13 at 20:55
    
Very neat! Although, it's important to note it doesn't work on any IE or Opera. – Rafael Xavier May 22 at 0:45

Did some research on some various Range Functions. Checkout the jsperf comparison of the different ways to do these functions. Certainly not a perfect or exhaustive list, but should help :)

The Winner is...

function range(lowEnd,highEnd){
    var arr = [],
    c = highEnd - lowEnd + 1;
    while ( c-- ) {
        arr[c] = highEnd--
    }
    return arr;
}
range(0,31);

Technically its not the fastest on firefox, but crazy speed difference (imho) on chrome makes up for it.

Also interesting observation is how much faster chrome is with these array functions than firefox. Chrome is at least 4 or 5 times faster.

share|improve this answer

An interesting challenge would be to write the shortest function to do this. Recursion to the rescue!

function r(a,b){return a>b?[]:[a].concat(r(++a,b))}

Tends to be slow on large ranges, but luckily quantum computers are just around the corner.

An added bonus is that it's obfuscatory. Because we all know how important it is to hide our code from prying eyes.

To truly and utterly obfuscate the function, do this:

function r(a,b){return (a<b?[a,b].concat(r(++a,--b)):a>b?[]:[a]).sort(function(a,b){return a-b})}
share|improve this answer

Though this is not from PHP, but an imitation of range from Python.

function range(start, end) {
    var total = [];

    if (!end) {
        end = start;
        start = 0;
    }

    for (var i = start; i < end; i += 1) {
        total.push(i);
    }

    return total;
}

console.log(range(10)); // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] 
console.log(range(0, 10)); // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
console.log(range(5, 10)); // [5, 6, 7, 8, 9] 
share|improve this answer

I would code something like this:

function range(start, end) {
    return Array(end-start).join(0).split(0).map(function(val, id) {return id+start});
}  

range(-4,2);
// [-4,-3,-2,-1,0,1]

range(3,9);
// [3,4,5,6,7,8]

It behaves similarly to Python range:

>>> range(-4,2)
[-4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1]
share|improve this answer

Using Harmony generators, current browser support is zero or very low:

var take = function (amount, generator) {
    var a = [];

    try {
        while (amount) {
            a.push(generator.next());
            amount -= 1;
        }
    } catch (e) {}

    return a;
};

var takeAll = function (gen) {
    var a = [],
        x;

    try {
        do {
            x = a.push(gen.next());
        } while (x);
    } catch (e) {}

    return a;
};

var range = (function (d) {
    var unlimited = (typeof d.to === "undefined");

    if (typeof d.from === "undefined") {
        d.from = 0;
    }

    if (typeof d.step === "undefined") {
        if (unlimited) {
            d.step = 1;
        }
    } else {
        if (typeof d.from !== "string") {
            if (d.from < d.to) {
                d.step = 1;
            } else {
                d.step = -1;
            }
        } else {
            if (d.from.charCodeAt(0) < d.to.charCodeAt(0)) {
                d.step = 1;
            } else {
                d.step = -1;
            }
        }
    }

    if (typeof d.from === "string") {
        for (let i = d.from.charCodeAt(0); (d.step > 0) ? (unlimited ? true : i <= d.to.charCodeAt(0)) : (i >= d.to.charCodeAt(0)); i += d.step) {
            yield String.fromCharCode(i);
        }
    } else {
        for (let i = d.from; (d.step > 0) ? (unlimited ? true : i <= d.to) : (i >= d.to); i += d.step) {
            yield i;
        }
    }
});

Examples

take

Example 1.

take only takes as much as it can get

take(10, range( {from: 100, step: 5, to: 120} ) )

returns

[100, 105, 110, 115, 120]

Example 2.

to not neccesary

take(10, range( {from: 100, step: 5} ) )

returns

[100, 105, 110, 115, 120, 125, 130, 135, 140, 145]

takeAll

Example 3.

from not neccesary

takeAll( range( {to: 5} ) )

returns

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Example 4.

takeAll( range( {to: 500, step: 100} ) )

returns

[0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500]

Example 5.

takeAll( range( {from: 'z', to: 'a'} ) )

returns

["z", "y", "x", "w", "v", "u", "t", "s", "r", "q", "p", "o", "n", "m", "l", "k", "j", "i", "h", "g", "f", "e", "d", "c", "b", "a"]

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice, but it could benefit from being a bit more readable. – alex Oct 30 '12 at 21:47
    
@alex: suggestions welcome :) hehehe – Janus Troelsen Oct 31 '12 at 0:20
    
Edited with my suggestions :) – Xotic750 Jun 12 '13 at 12:50
    
+1 for the approach. To @alex's point, not having ternary operations (especially not nested) in the for clause would improve readability here. – Justin Johnson May 27 '14 at 6:03

you can use lodash function _.range(10) https://lodash.com/docs#range

share|improve this answer

You can use lodash or Undescore.js range:

var range = require('lodash/utility/range')
range(10)
// -> [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ]

Alternatively, if you only need a consecutive range of integers you can do something like:

Array.apply(undefined, { length: 10 }).map(Number.call, Number)
// -> [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ]

In ES6 range can be implemented with generators:

function* range(start=0, end=null, step=1) {
  if (end == null) {
    end = start;
    start = 0;
  }

  for (let i=start; i < end; i+=step) {
    yield i;
  }
}

This implementation saves memory when iterating large sequences, because it doesn't have to materialize all values into an array:

for (let i of range(1, oneZillion)) {
  console.log(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The ES6 part is now the correct answer to this question. I would recommend removing the other parts, which are covered by other answers. – joews Nov 8 '15 at 15:24

As far as generating a numeric array for a given range, I use this:

function range(start, stop)
{
    var array = [];

    var length = stop - start; 

    for (var i = 0; i <= length; i++) { 
        array[i] = start;
        start++;
    }

    return array;
}

console.log(range(1, 7));  // [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
console.log(range(5, 10)); // [5,6,7,8,9,10]
console.log(range(-2, 3)); // [-2,-1,0,1,2,3]

Obviously, it won't work for alphabetical arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
Setting array = [] inside the loop may not give you what you want. – alex May 23 '15 at 2:36
    
@alex, thank you. You're right, I also forgot to increment the "start" parameter on each pass of the loop. It's fixed now. – jhaskell May 24 '15 at 2:56
    
It still won't produce the desired output, if I want range 5-10, it will give me [5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14], I would expect only the first half of that array. – alex May 24 '15 at 7:55
    
@alex, thank you again, I had not considered a length constraint based on input. See updated version. – jhaskell May 25 '15 at 16:46

I was surprised to come across this thread and see nothing like my solution (maybe I missed an answer), so here it is. I use a simple range function in ES6 syntax :

// [begin, end[
const range = (b, e) => Array.apply(null, Array(e - b)).map((_, i) => {return i+b;});

But it works only when counting forward (ie. begin < end), so we can modify it slightly when needed like so :

const range = (b, e) => Array.apply(null, Array(Math.abs(e - b))).map((_, i) => {return b < e ? i+b : b-i;});
share|improve this answer
    
Use [...Array(e-b)] while you are at it. – andlrc Feb 9 at 21:22

Range is not defined in javascript by the compiler but interestingly google chrome V8 engine defines it and

>console.log(sum(range(1,10)))
45

This is also explained in the first chapter of http://eloquentjavascript.net/chapter1.html.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is not correct. That page happens to have sum and range functions defined globally, but they aren't native. – Omni5cience Jun 24 '15 at 17:32

I found a JS range function equivalent to the one in PHP, and works amazingly great here. Works forward & backward, and works with integers, floats and alphabets!

function range(low, high, step) {
  //  discuss at: http://phpjs.org/functions/range/
  // original by: Waldo Malqui Silva
  //   example 1: range ( 0, 12 );
  //   returns 1: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]
  //   example 2: range( 0, 100, 10 );
  //   returns 2: [0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100]
  //   example 3: range( 'a', 'i' );
  //   returns 3: ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i']
  //   example 4: range( 'c', 'a' );
  //   returns 4: ['c', 'b', 'a']

  var matrix = [];
  var inival, endval, plus;
  var walker = step || 1;
  var chars = false;

  if (!isNaN(low) && !isNaN(high)) {
    inival = low;
    endval = high;
  } else if (isNaN(low) && isNaN(high)) {
    chars = true;
    inival = low.charCodeAt(0);
    endval = high.charCodeAt(0);
  } else {
    inival = (isNaN(low) ? 0 : low);
    endval = (isNaN(high) ? 0 : high);
  }

  plus = ((inival > endval) ? false : true);
  if (plus) {
    while (inival <= endval) {
      matrix.push(((chars) ? String.fromCharCode(inival) : inival));
      inival += walker;
    }
  } else {
    while (inival >= endval) {
      matrix.push(((chars) ? String.fromCharCode(inival) : inival));
      inival -= walker;
    }
  }

  return matrix;
}

And here is the minified version:

function range(h,c,b){var i=[];var d,f,e;var a=b||1;var g=false;if(!isNaN(h)&&!isNaN(c)){d=h;f=c}else{if(isNaN(h)&&isNaN(c)){g=true;d=h.charCodeAt(0);f=c.charCodeAt(0)}else{d=(isNaN(h)?0:h);f=(isNaN(c)?0:c)}}e=((d>f)?false:true);if(e){while(d<=f){i.push(((g)?String.fromCharCode(d):d));d+=a}}else{while(d>=f){i.push(((g)?String.fromCharCode(d):d));d-=a}}return i};
share|improve this answer

For a more ruby-like approach with good backward compatibility:

range([begin], end = 0) where begin and end are numbers

var range = function(begin, end) {
  if (typeof end === "undefined") {
    end = begin; begin = 0;
  }
  var result = [], modifier = end > begin ? 1 : -1;
  for ( var i = 0; i <= Math.abs(end - begin); i++ ) {
    result.push(begin + i * modifier);
  }
  return result;
}

Examples:

range(3); //=> [0, 1, 2, 3]
range(-2); //=> [0, -1, -2]
range(1, 2) //=> [1, 2]
range(1, -2); //=> [1, 0, -1, -2]
share|improve this answer
    
typeof on a variable guaranteed to be set can be replaced with a strict equality check with undefined or void 0 if you're paranoid and not in strict mode. – alex Jan 22 at 8:58

Solution:

//best performance
var range = function(start, stop, step) {
    var a = [start];
    while (start < stop) {
        start += step || 1;
        a.push(start);
    }
    return a;
};

//or
var range = function(start, end) {
    return Array(++end-start).join(0).split(0).map(function(n, i) {
        return i+start
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Best performance has a few things that could be improved, such as setting step to a default value outside of the loop. – alex Apr 12 at 15:28

My take using conditional ternary operators in the for loop (no argument testing, though).

function range(start,end,step){
   var resar = [];
   for (var i=start;(step<0 ? i>=end:i<=end); i += (step == undefined ? 1:step)){
       resar.push(i);
     };
   return resar;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Does a lot of unnecessary work each iteration though. – alex Oct 21 '15 at 0:01

d3 also has a built-in range function. See https://github.com/mbostock/d3/wiki/Arrays#d3_range:

d3.range([start, ]stop[, step])

Generates an array containing an arithmetic progression, similar to the Python built-in range. This method is often used to iterate over a sequence of numeric or integer values, such as the indexes into an array. Unlike the Python version, the arguments are not required to be integers, though the results are more predictable if they are due to floating point precision. If step is omitted, it defaults to 1.

Example:

d3.range(10)
// returns [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution that mimics Python. At the bottom you can find some examples how to use it. It works with numbers, just like Python's range:

var assert = require('assert');    // if you use Node, otherwise remove the asserts

var L = {};    // L, i.e. 'list'

// range(start, end, step)
L.range = function (a, b, c) {
    assert(arguments.length >= 1 && arguments.length <= 3);
    if (arguments.length === 3) {
        assert(c != 0);
    }

    var li = [],
        i,
        start, end, step,
        up = true;    // Increasing or decreasing order? Default: increasing.

    if (arguments.length === 1) {
        start = 0;
        end = a;
        step = 1;
    }

    if (arguments.length === 2) {
        start = a;
        end = b;
        step = 1;
    }

    if (arguments.length === 3) {
        start = a;
        end = b;
        step = c;
        if (c < 0) {
            up = false;
        }
    }

    if (up) {
        for (i = start; i < end; i += step) {
            li.push(i);
        }
    } else {
        for (i = start; i > end; i += step) {
            li.push(i);
        }
    }

    return li;
}

Examples:

// range
L.range(0) -> []
L.range(1) -> [0]
L.range(2) -> [0, 1]
L.range(5) -> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

L.range(1, 5) -> [1, 2, 3, 4]
L.range(6, 4) -> []
L.range(-2, 2) -> [-2, -1, 0, 1]

L.range(1, 5, 1) -> [1, 2, 3, 4]
L.range(0, 10, 2) -> [0, 2, 4, 6, 8]
L.range(10, 2, -1) -> [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3]
L.range(10, 2, -2) -> [10, 8, 6, 4]
share|improve this answer

Coded to 2010 specs (ya, it is 2016 with ES6 generators). Here's my take, with options to emulate the Python's range() function.

Array.range = function(start, end, step){
    if (start == undefined) { return [] } // "undefined" check

    if ( (step === 0) )  {  return []; // vs. throw TypeError("Invalid 'step' input")
    }  // "step" == 0  check

    if (typeof start == 'number') { // number check
        if (typeof end == 'undefined') { // single argument input
            end = start;
            start = 0;
            step = 1;
        }
        if ((!step) || (typeof step != 'number')) {
          step = end < start ? -1 : 1;
        }

        var length = Math.max(Math.ceil((end - start) / step), 0);
        var out = Array(length);

        for (var idx = 0; idx < length; idx++, start += step) {
          out[idx] = start;
        }

        // Uncomment to check "end" in range() output, non pythonic
        if ( (out[out.length-1] + step) == end ) { // "end" check
            out.push(end)
        }

    } else { 
        // Historical: '&' is the 27th letter: http://nowiknow.com/and-the-27th-letter-of-the-alphabet/
        // Axiom: 'a' < 'z' and 'z' < 'A'
        // note: 'a' > 'A' == true ("small a > big A", try explaining it to a kid! )

        var st = 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ&'; // axiom ordering

        if (typeof end == 'undefined') { // single argument input
            end = start;
            start = 'a';
        }

        var first = st.indexOf(start);
        var last = st.indexOf(end);

        if ((!step) || (typeof step != 'number')) {
          step = last < first ? -1 : 1;
        }

        if ((first == -1) || (last == -1 )) { // check 'first' & 'last'
            return []
        }

        var length = Math.max(Math.ceil((last - first) / step), 0);
        var out = Array(length);

        for (var idx = 0; idx < length; idx++, first += step) {
          out[idx] = st[first];
        } 

        // Uncomment to check "end" in range() output, non pythonic
        if ( (st.indexOf(out[out.length-1]) + step ) == last ) { // "end" check
            out.push(end)
        }
    }
    return out;
}

Example:

Array.range(5);       // [0,1,2,3,4,5]
Array.range(4,-4,-2); // [4, 2, 0, -2, -4]
Array.range('a','d'); // ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
Array.range('B','y'); // ["B", "A", "z", "y"], different from chr() ordering
Array.range('f');     // ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]
Array.range(-5);      // [], similar to python
Array.range(-5,0)     // [-5,-4-,-3-,-2,-1,0]
share|improve this answer

If we input something like [4, 2], we’ll get [2, 3, 4] as output, we can work with that.

function createRange(array) {
  var range = [];
  var highest = array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.max(a, b);
  });
  var lowest = array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.min(a, b);
  });
  for (var i = lowest; i <= highest; i++) {
    range.push(i);
  }
  return range;
}
share|improve this answer
    
var highest = Math.max.apply(null, array). – alex Mar 4 at 23:33
    
or Math.max(...array) – alex Mar 18 at 9:35
    
What's wrong with descending order? range[4, 2] should return sequence [4, 3, 2]. BTW, it assumes the input array might be any length but you pick only two values (array.reduce is an overkill in this case), suppose createRange(a, b) would be more handy here – abuduba Mar 22 at 21:37

just made something like this as an exercise in Eloquent JavaScript

function range(start, end, step) {
  var ar = [];
  if (start < end) {
    if (arguments.length == 2) step = 1;
    for (var i = start; i <= end; i += step) {
      ar.push(i);
    }
  }
  else {
    if (arguments.length == 2) step = -1;
    for (var i = start; i >= end; i += step) {
      ar.push(i);
    }
  }
  return ar;
}
share|improve this answer

You can use a function with an array, a for loop, and a Math.random() variable to solve that. The for loop pushes numbers into the array, which will contain all the numbers in your range. Then the Math.random() randomly selects one, based on the array's length.

function randNumInRange(min, max) {
  var range = []
  for(var count = min; count <= max; count++) {
    range.push(count);
  }
  var randNum = Math.floor(Math.random() * range.length);
  alert(range[randNum]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
As @btk posted, there are many approaches in this related post – Shawn Mehan Sep 13 '15 at 19:41

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