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I've got a HashSet,

var universe = new HashSet<int>();

And a bunch of subsets,

var sets = new List<HashSet<int>>(numSets);

I want to subtract a chunk,

var remaining = universe.ExceptWith(sets[0]);

It looks like ExceptWith is the function I want, but it works in-place. I don't want to modify the universe... I guess I should clone it first? How do I do that?

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You mean you want to know how to clone a hash set? –  kennytm Oct 9 '10 at 19:37
    
@KennyTM: I mean I want to know how to get the job done. If that means cloning, then yes, if there's a better way, then no. –  Mark Oct 9 '10 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I guess I should clone it first? How do I do that?

var universe = new HashSet<int>();
var subset = new HashSet<int>();
...

// clone the universe
var remaining = new HashSet<int>(universe);
remaining.ExceptWith(subset);

Not as simple as with the Except extension method, but probably faster (you should run a few performance tests to make sure)

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How about Except()?

var x = new HashSet<int>();
var y = new HashSet<int>();

var xminusy = new HashSet<int>(x.Except(y));
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But Except is an extension method, ExceptWith is specifically built to work with HashSets... is this just as efficient? –  Mark Oct 9 '10 at 19:47
1  
@Mark, it's definitely less efficient than just ExceptWith, but it's about as efficient as cloning it first and then calling ExceptWith. –  Kirk Woll Oct 10 '10 at 0:02
1  
@Kirk: Finally got around to testing this. Not true. It's still about 40% slower. programanddesign.com/cs/subtracting-sets –  Mark Dec 31 '10 at 5:08
    
@Ralph: Very interesting. This is why I usually stick to answering C++ questions ;-) –  James McNellis Dec 31 '10 at 5:11
    
Except is superior in the scenario where you need an IEqualityComparer (imagine using 2 sets of serialized objects, where the object's contents are identical, but their HashCode is not), unfortunately ExceptWith does not support a custom IEqualityComparer, but the Except extension method does. In the case of integers like here, that is ofc not an issue. –  Joris Feb 14 '11 at 0:45

I benchmarked Linq's Except method against cloning and using the HashSet-native function ExceptWith. Here are the results.

static class Program
{
    public static HashSet<T> ToSet<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection)
    {
        return new HashSet<T>(collection);
    }

    public static HashSet<T> Subtract<T>(this HashSet<T> set, IEnumerable<T> other)
    {
        var clone = set.ToSet();
        clone.ExceptWith(other);
        return clone;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var A = new HashSet<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
        var B = new HashSet<int> { 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 };
        var sw = new Stopwatch();

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i)
        {
            var C = A.Except(B).ToSet();
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Linq: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        sw.Restart();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i)
        {
            var C = A.Subtract(B);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Native: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Linq: 1297 ms
Native: 762 ms

http://programanddesign.com/cs/subtracting-sets/

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A hash set has to track its hash algorithm constants, and its overflow bins. The elements in the set are held by reference. Creating a new hash with the copy constructor, as Thomas Levesque suggests, creates a shallow copy of this overhead and should be quite fast. Using Except() in the way that James McNellis suggests first creates an anonymous copy and then passes that to the copy constructor which uses the fields in the anonymous to initialize its own fields. As Thomas said, you might do a few performance tests, but theoretically his answer should beat James' answer. And by the way, to my way of thinking, a shallow copy is not a clone since I believe a clone implies that the underlying elements are also copied. Hash sets with common elements use a copy when modified strategy.

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Yeah.. you're right, I don't think I need a deep copy anyway. Using int's in this example, but they'll be classes in practice; a reference is fine though. –  Mark Oct 10 '10 at 8:57

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