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I need to sort some objects according to their contents (in fact according to one of their properties, which is NOT the key and may be duplicated between different objects)

.net provides two classes (SortedDictionnary and SortedList), and both are some kind of Dictionaries. The only difference (AFAIK) is that SortedDictionnary uses a binary tree to maintain its state whereas SortedList does not and is accessible via an index.

I could achieve what I want using a List, and then using its Sort() method with a custom implementation of IComparer, but it wouldn't be time-efficient as I would sort the whole List each time I insert a new object, whereas a good SortedList would just insert the item at the right position.

What I need is a SortedList class with a RefreshPosition(int index) to move only the changed (or inserted) object rather than resorting the whole list each time an object inside changes.

Am I missing something obvious ?

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9  
Another major WTF for .Net. It has some great stuff going for it, but I'm completely shocked that they don't have a class for this, nor some other things that you'd think are quite common. –  Mark May 9 '10 at 1:30
1  
.NET now provides a SortedSet<T>, but this still doesn't support duplicates. They must have some sort of an ideological issue with supporting sorted lists with duplicates. –  romkyns Nov 14 '12 at 11:39
    
possible duplicate of Is there a sorted collection type in .NET? –  nawfal May 21 at 20:24

6 Answers 6

Maybe I'm slow, but isn't this the easiest implementation ever?

class SortedList<T> : List<T>
{
    public new void Add(T item)
    {
        Insert(~BinarySearch(item), item);
    }
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w4e7fxsh.aspx


Unfortunately, Add wasn't overrideable so I had to new it which isn't so nice when you have List<T> list = new SortedList<T>; which I actually needed to do.... so I went ahead and rebuilt the whole thing...

class SortedList<T> : IList<T>
{
    private List<T> list = new List<T>();

    public int IndexOf(T item)
    {
        var index = list.BinarySearch(item);
        return index < 0 ? -1 : index;
    }

    public void Insert(int index, T item)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException("Cannot insert at index; must preserve order.");
    }

    public void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        list.RemoveAt(index);
    }

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return list[index];
        }
        set
        {
            list.RemoveAt(index);
            this.Add(value);
        }
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        list.Insert(~list.BinarySearch(item), item);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        list.Clear();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return list.BinarySearch(item) >= 0;
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        list.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return list.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        var index = list.BinarySearch(item);
        if (index < 0) return false;
        list.RemoveAt(index);
        return true;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return list.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return list.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

Or perhaps something like this is a more appropriate Remove function...

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        var index = list.BinarySearch(item);
        if (index < 0) return false;
        while (((IComparable)item).CompareTo((IComparable)list[index]) == 0)
        {
            if (item == list[index])
            {
                list.RemoveAt(index);
                return true;
            }
            index++;
        }
        return false;
    }

Assuming items can compare equal but not be equal...

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2  
Thanks for the class. One edit: shouldn't the Add method be more like the following, to avoid the ArgumentOutOfRangeException exception? ` public virtual void Add(T item) { int index = list_.BinarySearch(item); list_.Insert(index >= 0 ? index : ~index, item); } ` –  Suncat2000 Apr 9 at 17:04
    
Probably. I guess I didn't test with duplicate items :-) –  Mark Apr 14 at 18:47
    
@Mark you need not write that Remove method. It's basically O(n). You could instead just pass the comparer to the list.BinarySearch method. It would give you the correct index to remove at. In your case: index = list.BinarySearch(item, Comparer<T>.Default) and then list.RemoveAt(index). It's O(n - index). Slight gain :) And ya Suncat is right. I will provide an answer here bringing both changes. –  nawfal Jun 9 at 4:54
    
@nawfal This was awfully long ago, but it doesn't look O(n) to me. It's O(m) where m is the number of elements that match your search; I imagine that would be 0 or 1 in most cases. –  Mark Jun 9 at 15:37
1  
@Mark But actually removing the item is O(n), after you find it, because it's a list, so while you can find the item to remove in less than O(n) time, Remove is still O(n). –  Servy Jun 9 at 16:03

I eventually decided to write it :

class RealSortedList<T> : List<T>
    {
        public IComparer<T> comparer;

        public int SortItem(int index)
        {
            T item = this[index];
            this.RemoveAt(index);
            int goodposition=FindLocation(this[index], 0, this.Count);
            this.Insert(goodposition, item);
            return goodposition;
        }

        public int FindLocation(T item, int begin, int end)
        {
            if (begin==end)
                return begin;
            int middle = begin + end / 2;
            int comparisonvalue = comparer.Compare(item, this[middle]);
            if (comparisonvalue < 0)
                return FindLocation(item,begin, middle);
            else if (comparisonvalue > 0)
                return FindLocation(item,middle, end);
            else
                return middle;
        }
    }
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1  
Go on, make it an extension on IList<T>, you know you want to! :) –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 23 '08 at 19:59

Don't forget that inserting an item into a list backed by an array can be an expensive operation - inserting a bunch of items and then sorting may well be quicker unless you really need to sort after every single operation.

Alternatively, you could always wrap a list and make your add operation find the right place and insert it there.

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Yes, you're definitely right, in cases of mass inserts, sorting only once after the inserts is faster ! Still, I think a UpdatePosition(int index, IComparer<T> comparer) which would assume that the list is sorted using comparer and would update the indexes accordingly would be quite useful ! –  Brann Dec 23 '08 at 19:53

I asked a similar question a while back, and there's some good answers there. There a good collection of collections here.

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I've solved this problem in the past by writing an extension method that does a binary search on a IList, and another that does an insert. You can look up the correct implementation in the CLR source because there's a built-in version that works only on arrays, and then just tweak it to be an extension on IList.

One of those "should be in the BCL already" things.

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What I need is a SortedList class with a RefreshPosition(int index) to move only the changed (or inserted) object rather than resorting the whole list each time an object inside changes.

Why would you update using an index when such updates invalidate the index? Really, I would think that updating by object reference would be more convenient. You can do this with the SortedList - just remember that your Key type is the same as the return type of the function that extracts the comparable data form the object.

class UpdateableSortedList<K,V> {
    private SortedList<K,V> list = new SortedList<K,V>();
    public delegate K ExtractKeyFunc(V v);
    private ExtractKeyFunc func;

    public UpdateableSortedList(ExtractKeyFunc f) { func = f; }

    public void Add(V v) {
        list[func(v)] = v;
    }
    public void Update(V v) {
        int i = list.IndexOfValue(v);
        if (i >= 0) {
            list.RemoveAt(i);
        }
        list[func(v)] = v;
    }
    public IEnumerable<T> Values { get { return list.Values; } }
}

Something like that I guess.

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As I stated into my post, different objects V can have the same "comparable value" K. I don't think SortedList supports duplicate Keys ; or am I mistaking ? –  Brann Dec 23 '08 at 19:47
    
Ugh. I shouldn't have spent so much time in the SO editor. You know the solution: implement a binary tree yourself (to meet your requirements), or reuse one of the framework classes. If the framework classes don't work, then convert the SortedList into a MultiSortedList. –  Frank Krueger Dec 23 '08 at 19:53
    
Yes ; that's the way to go. Too bad this functionnality is not built in into the .net framework ! –  Brann Dec 23 '08 at 19:55

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