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I'm making a pagination system (sort of like Facebook) where the content loads when the user scrolls to the bottom. I imagine the best way to do that is to find when the user is at the bottom of the page and run an ajax query to load more posts.

The only problem is I don't know how to check if the user has scrolled to the bottom of the page with jQuery. Any ideas?

tl;dr I need to find a way to check when the user has scrolled to the bottom of the page with jQuery. :)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 353 down vote accepted

Use the .scroll() event on window, like this:

$(window).scroll(function() {
   if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() == $(document).height()) {
       alert("bottom!");
   }
});

You can test it here, this takes the top scroll of the window, so how much it's scrolled down, adds the height of the visible window and checks if that equals the height of the overall content (document). If you wanted to instead check if the user is near the bottom, it'd look something like this:

$(window).scroll(function() {
   if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 100) {
       alert("near bottom!");
   }
});

You can test that version here, just adjust that 100 to whatever pixel from the bottom you want to trigger on.

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11  
As usual you get there before me. Anyway, to the OP, if you have a container of posts, use it's ID instead of "window", also, you might want to change the last .height() to scrollHeight –  Christian Oct 9 '10 at 22:40
3  
it works great! but isnt it a bit heavy? on each scroll? –  Kevin Vella Apr 18 '12 at 14:49
2  
Firefox calls alert("bottom!"); many times (works fine with chrome and safari) –  Marco Matarazzi Aug 13 '12 at 14:09
2  
it's kinda buggy, if you do a console.log() instead of alert it sometimes repeats the command. –  Pineapple Under the Sea Aug 27 '12 at 12:37
7  
@KevinVella Vella good combination is to use this with _.debounce() in underscore utility to prevent it firing until user has stopped scrolling - underscorejs.org/#debounce - –  JohnnyFaldo Feb 10 at 11:27

Nick Craver's answer works fine, spare the issue that the value of $(document).height() varies by browser.

To make it work on all browsers, use this function from James Padolsey:

function getDocHeight() {
    var D = document;
    return Math.max(
        D.body.scrollHeight, D.documentElement.scrollHeight,
        D.body.offsetHeight, D.documentElement.offsetHeight,
        D.body.clientHeight, D.documentElement.clientHeight
    );
}

in place of $(document).height(), so that the final code is:

$(window).scroll(function() {
       if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() == getDocHeight()) {
           alert("bottom!");
       }
   });
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1  
He has updated with a slightly compressed version function getDocHeight() { var D = document; return Math.max( D.body.scrollHeight, D.documentElement.scrollHeight, D.body.offsetHeight, D.documentElement.offsetHeight, D.body.clientHeight, D.documentElement.clientHeight ); } –  Drew Jul 26 '13 at 14:43

For those using Nick's solution and getting repeated alerts / events firing, you could add a line of code above the alert example:

$(window).scroll(function() {
   if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 100) {
       $(window).unbind('scroll');
       alert("near bottom!");
   }
});

This means that the code will only fire the first time you're within 100px of the bottom of the document. It won't repeat if you scroll back up and then back down, which may or may not be useful depending on what you're using Nick's code for.

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1  
I would've just commented and said where that line of code is since its relevant to someone else's answer but +1 for the intention! –  Nate-Wilkins Oct 1 '12 at 17:07
    
Sorry, I couldn't (and still can't) see how to add a comment to the answer (like I can here)? –  Tim Carr Oct 1 '12 at 19:12
    
Yea new users can't add a comment to posts unless you get more rep. –  Nate-Wilkins Oct 1 '12 at 21:12
    
Ah, that explains it! Thanks. –  Tim Carr Oct 2 '12 at 10:10
    
Out side the first if you could put a different if that tests if the change you wanted the script to make exists, say a class having been applied to a div. This would make the second nested if not run if it has already run. –  fredsbend Jan 31 '13 at 9:06

Further to the excellent accepted answer from Nick Craver, you can throttle the scroll event so that it is not fired so frequently thus increasing browser performance:

var _throttleTimer = null;
var _throttleDelay = 100;
var $window = $(window);
var $document = $(document);

$document.ready(function () {

    $window
        .off('scroll', ScrollHandler)
        .on('scroll', ScrollHandler);

});

function ScrollHandler(e) {
    //throttle event:
    clearTimeout(_throttleTimer);
    _throttleTimer = setTimeout(function () {
        console.log('scroll');

        //do work
        if ($window.scrollTop() + $window.height() > $document.height() - 100) {
            alert("near bottom!");
        }

    }, _throttleDelay);
}
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It should probably be pointed out that this requires Underscore.js: underscorejs.org. It's a very good point, though. The scroll event should pretty much always be throttled to avoid serious performance issues. –  Jude Osborn Jun 18 '13 at 8:21
15  
The above code does NOT require Underscore.js –  geo1701 Jun 19 '13 at 9:03
    
Maybe it's just me and it could use some benchmarking, but I don't like the idea of invoking clearTimeout and setTimeout on every scroll event. I would issue 1 setTimeout and add some guards in that handler. It's probably just a micro-optimization (if at all). –  Grimace of Despair Sep 16 '13 at 14:31
    
This is a really neat addition! I can think of one further improvement . Currently the function that checks the height wont run if the user continues to scroll. If this is a problem (e.g. you want to trigger the function when the user scrolled half way down regardless of if they keep scrolling) you can easily make sure that the function actually gets called while still prohibiting multiple calls during the chosen interval. Here is a gist to show it. gist.github.com/datacarl/7029558 –  datacarl Oct 17 '13 at 18:16

Nick Craver's answer needs to be slightly modified to work on iOS 6 Safari Mobile and should be:

$(window).scroll(function() {
   if($(window).scrollTop() + window.innerHeight == $(document).height()) {
       alert("bottom!");
   }
});

Changing $(window).height() to window.innerHeight should be done because when the address bar is hidden an additional 60px are added to the window's height but using $(window).height() does not reflect this change, while using window.innerHeight does.

Note: The window.innerHeight property also includes the horizontal scrollbar's height (if it is rendered), unlike $(window).height() which will not include the horizontal scrollbar's height. This is not a problem in Mobile Safari, but could cause unexpected behavior in other browsers or future versions of Mobile Safari. Changing "==" to ">=" could fix this for most common use cases.

Read more about the window.innerHeight property here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/window.innerHeight

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Thanks Yosi, your answer did the trick for me in google chrome under mac os –  sd1sd1 Feb 14 at 20:37
    
your help did my work too. –  anuj arora Jun 11 at 5:06
    
window.innerHeight made more sense for what i was trying to accomplish thanks! –  Amir5000 Sep 18 at 17:36

Here is a piece of code that will help you debug your code, I tested the above answers and found them to be buggy. I have test the followings on Chrome, IE, Firefox, IPad(Safari). I don't have any others installed to test...

<script type="text/javascript">
   $(function() {
      $(window).scroll(function () {
         var docElement = $(document)[0].documentElement;
         var winElement = $(window)[0];

         if ((docElement.scrollHeight - winElement.innerHeight) == winElement.pageYOffset) {
            alert('bottom');
         }
      });
   });
</script>

There may be a simpler solution, but I stopped at the point at which IT WORKED

If you are still having problems with some rogue browser, here is some code to help you debug:

<script type="text/javascript">
   $(function() {
      $(window).scroll(function () {
         var docElement = $(document)[0].documentElement;
         var details = "";
         details += '<b>Document</b><br />';
         details += 'clientHeight:' + docElement.clientHeight + '<br />';
         details += 'clientTop:' + docElement.clientTop + '<br />';
         details += 'offsetHeight:' + docElement.offsetHeight + '<br />';
         details += 'offsetParent:' + (docElement.offsetParent == null) + '<br />';
         details += 'scrollHeight:' + docElement.scrollHeight + '<br />';
         details += 'scrollTop:' + docElement.scrollTop + '<br />';

         var winElement = $(window)[0];
         details += '<b>Window</b><br />';
         details += 'innerHeight:' + winElement.innerHeight + '<br />';
         details += 'outerHeight:' + winElement.outerHeight + '<br />';
         details += 'pageYOffset:' + winElement.pageYOffset + '<br />';
         details += 'screenTop:' + winElement.screenTop + '<br />';
         details += 'screenY:' + winElement.screenY + '<br />';
         details += 'scrollY:' + winElement.scrollY + '<br />';

         details += '<b>End of page</b><br />';
         details += 'Test:' + (docElement.scrollHeight - winElement.innerHeight) + '=' + winElement.pageYOffset + '<br />';
         details += 'End of Page? ';
         if ((docElement.scrollHeight - winElement.innerHeight) == winElement.pageYOffset) {
             details += 'YES';
         } else {
             details += 'NO';
         }

         $('#test').html(details);
      });
   });
</script>
<div id="test" style="position: fixed; left:0; top: 0; z-index: 9999; background-color: #FFFFFF;">

I hope this will save someone some time, if it did, please upvote :D

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protected by animuson Sep 24 '13 at 20:41

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