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Now I'm trying to find the best java decompiler, I found these:

With these decompilers I handle byte code of this class:

public class ss
{
public static void main(String args[])
{
  try{
   System.out.println("try");

  }
  catch(Exception e)
  {
   System.out.println("catch");
  }
  finally
  {System.out.println("finally");}
}
}

and I got the following results:

fernflower:

public class ss {

   public static void main(String[] var0) {
      try {
         System.out.println("try");
      } catch (Exception var5) {
         System.out.println("catch");
      } finally {
         System.out.println("finally");
      }

   }
}

DJ Java Decompiler:

import java.io.PrintStream;

public class ss
{

    public ss()
    {
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        System.out.println("try");
        System.out.println("finally");
        break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_50;
        Exception exception;
        exception;
        System.out.println("catch");
        System.out.println("finally");
        break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_50;
        Exception exception1;
        exception1;
        System.out.println("finally");
        throw exception1;
    }
}

cavaj:

import java.io.PrintStream;

public class ss
{

    public ss()
    {
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        System.out.println("try");
        System.out.println("finally");
        break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_50;
        Exception exception;
        exception;
        System.out.println("catch");
        System.out.println("finally");
        break MISSING_BLOCK_LABEL_50;
        Exception exception1;
        exception1;
        System.out.println("finally");
        throw exception1;
    }
}

http://java.decompiler.free.fr/:

import java.io.PrintStream;
public class ss
{
  public static void main(String[] paramArrayOfString)
  {
    try
    {
      System.out.println("try");
    }
    catch (Exception localException)
    {
      System.out.println("catch");
    }
    finally {
      System.out.println("finally");
    }
  }
}

I see that the best result in decompiler: http://java.decompiler.free.fr/

To test, I wrote very simple code. What do you think, what code to write to test decompilers? Maybe the idea is to better than a try{} catch(){} finally{}?

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2  
If you're on OS X, I'd also give Jar Inspector a shot: codeland.org –  Brent Nash Oct 10 '10 at 0:13
1  
@Brent Nash, unfortunately Jar Inspector isn't maintained anymore and doesn't work under OSX Snow Leopard :( –  Richard Kettelerij Oct 12 '10 at 19:53
    
Note that java.decompiler.free.fr won't work anymore, the project is now on jd.benow.ca –  Michael Laffargue Oct 29 '13 at 8:31
    
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closed as off-topic by animuson Jul 18 '13 at 1:24

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9 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The code that you use to test should test the features available the in JDK used to compile the target class. For example, if you know that your target is written in Java 1.5, it is reasonable to assume that the code might include generics, so you will want to make sure that your chosen decompiler handles them properly. In my experience, the freely available decompilers tend to lag behind the JDK releases in terms of the features they support by 1-2 releases.

Based on personal trial and error, JD tends to do the best job in general. However, if you're decompiling code that was written in 1.3 or lower, I'd also suggest you give JODE a try.

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I have been using http://java.decompiler.free.fr/ for a long time now and found it to be the best one. In particular I used it to decompile a third-party jar and I was able to modify the source code as well with it.

Its easy to use and the UI is also neat and clean.

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If you anticipate to get any meaningful results, you really should test with a bit more non-trivial code. Fernflower was created with the aim of handling highly unusual and obfuscated bytecode. Thus decompiling such simple snippets is no big deal. By the way, if you are interested in testing the stand-alone version of Fernflower drop me a note at fernflower(dot)decompiler(at)gmail(dot)com. Version 0.8.4 is now in semi-public beta (however not available on the website yet).

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http://www.reversed-java.com/fernflower/, see my comparison on github.com /vorburger/ScratchApplet

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For information, JD supports switch(enum), switch(string), assert statements and for-each loops.

About the -g(javac) options,

  • if you omit the line numbers, JD can not reconstruct the original flow of instructions : the types of loop can not be determinate, the multiple assigments can not be regenerate, and the algorithm used to realign source code can not work.
  • if you omit the local variable data, JD can not, sometime, determine the exact range of variables. It's problematic.
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Do you mean JD? As in java.decompiler.free.fr ?? If so, I can't find a -g option at all and it doesn't support switch(enum) without it. –  mjaggard Apr 25 '12 at 17:27
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It looks like fernflower and JD Java Decompiler are producing decompiled code that is as good as is possible for this particular testcase. The other two aren't doing a good job, IMO.

What do you think, what code to write to test decompilers?

  1. Write more complicated code using all available constructs.
  2. Try them out on some real code.
  3. Try them out on some real code that has been obfuscated.

When trying out code that you compile from source, experiment with different "-g" options, and with different Java compilers.

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Ok, this is written from my mobile phone so bear with me.

1st of all, every java file codes are compiled in bytecode in their respective .class file. This means that constants are stored AS IS (hence strings can easily be retrieved) and variables are assigned to a register that is then put on a stack program execution when the JVM process the class file.

The reason your exception block are not returned to the original code you've written is because of the way javac compiled & translated the code to java bytecode.

If you want to know which decompiler works best, write all java well known statements (for loop, if statement, while loop) with some expressions & see what best represent your original code.

Good luck.

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Local variables are assigned directly to a stack slot. –  EJP Oct 10 '10 at 0:26
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It's been a while since any feedback to this thread. However since I found it and took the input seriously I feel it important to give an update.

I have used Java Decompiler Free with good success. However, recently I accidentally deleted quite a bit of code of a production J2EE application. assumed JD Free would handle it, but it doesn't handle generics at all. Plus there was code where it handled variable initialization totally wrong. What I ended up with was a total mess.

There may not be anything out there that will to the job correctly. In my case it's just another lesson in backup, backup, backup. I need a de-compiler that handles generics properly in order to do a mass recovery. But some accuracy of handling variables would also help. It is too much to ask a tool to spit out the original code. But what I have seen so far will compile but will not function properly, generics aside. So I suppose it's going to be a long week before Christmas!!

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2  
Yet another argument for using source control... –  Steve Czetty Dec 19 '12 at 17:45
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