Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've defined multiple constructors, with some default argument values in all of them. Looks correct (I can't see any ambiguity), but Scala (2.8) compiler complains:

multiple overloaded alternatives of constructor define default arguments

Does it mean that I can't define default values for overloaded constructors at all?

Let me illustrate the situation (primitivized, of course, but illustrative):


class A(subject : Double, factor : Int = 1, doItRight : Boolean = true) {

  def this (subject : Int, factor : Int = 1, doItRight : Boolean = true) = {
    this(subject.toDouble , factor, doItRight)
  }

  def this (subject : String, factor : Int = 1, doItRight : Boolean = true) = {
    this(subject.toDouble , factor, doItRight)
  }

  def this () = {
    this(defaultSubject)
  }

}



share|improve this question
1  
Would you mind posting the code you have with this? –  Mia Clarke Oct 10 '10 at 9:21

2 Answers 2

Taken straight from the compiler's source code:

// only one overloaded alternative is allowed to define default arguments

In general, I wouldn't advise that you mix overloading and defaults. Even if there's no conflict it can make your code harder to read.

UPDATE

Since you added code, it's clear now that you don't want/need to override the default values for each secondary constructor. In your particular case, I might even question the need for those extra constructors at all; Int=>Double is already available for you as an implicit conversion and String=>Double looks like you might be perverting the type system :)

Also... As an alternative to overloaded constructors, you can define just the primary constructor with defaults, then overload the apply method of the companion object and use that as a factory. This is of course completely optional, but it's rapidly becoming established as a pattern through the use of case classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Using factories seems pretty unnecessary in the case, and violating Occam's razor. It'd be even prettier to implement constructors for all the cases (manually applying default values) IMHO, and so I've done (looks too oldie and self-repeating though). –  Ivan Oct 10 '10 at 10:10
    
I would take a hard look at my code, if I would need these amounts of constructors. I hardly need a single one these days... –  soc Oct 10 '10 at 14:06

The overloading fails because you (unnessesarily) define multiple constructors with default values. Do this instead:

class A(subject : Double, factor : Int = 1, doItRight : Boolean = true) {

  def this (subject : Int) = {
    this(subject.toDouble)
  }

  def this (subject : String) = {
    this(subject.toDouble)
  }

  def this () = {
    this(defaultSubject)
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But don't factor and doItRight arguments need to be explicitly specified if subject Int or String in this case? –  Ivan Oct 10 '10 at 12:09
    
They are default? –  soc Oct 10 '10 at 14:07
    
@Ivan, No, you don't need to specify them, as you've already set default values for them in the main constructor. –  Mia Clarke Oct 10 '10 at 14:54
    
Why was this downvoted? –  Mia Clarke May 4 '13 at 20:56
    
I guess it's because your code doesn't do what was expected at the first place. With your code, you can't do something like " new A("Subject", 98, false) " –  frank Jun 16 '14 at 15:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.