Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does one change the font size for all elements (ticks, labels, title) on a matplotlib plot?

I know how to change the tick label sizes, this is done with:

import matplotlib 
matplotlib.rc('xtick', labelsize=20) 
matplotlib.rc('ytick', labelsize=20) 

But how does one change the rest?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 73 down vote accepted

From the matplotlib documentation,

font = {'family' : 'normal',
        'weight' : 'bold',
        'size'   : 22}

matplotlib.rc('font', **font)

This sets the font of all items to the font specified by the kwargs object, font.

share|improve this answer
matplotlib.rcParams.update({'font.size': 22})
share|improve this answer

If you want to change the fontsize for just a specific plot that has already been created, try this:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

ax = plt.subplot(111, xlabel='x', ylabel='y', title='title')
for item in ([ax.title, ax.xaxis.label, ax.yaxis.label] +
             ax.get_xticklabels() + ax.get_yticklabels()):
    item.set_fontsize(20)
share|improve this answer

This answer is for anyone trying to change all the fonts, including for the legend, and for anyone trying to use different fonts and sizes for each thing. It does not use rc (which doesn't seem to work for me). It is rather cumbersome but I could not get to grips with any other method personally. It basically combines ryggyr's answer here with other answers on SO.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.font_manager as font_manager

# Set the font dictionaries (for plot title and axis titles)
title_font = {'fontname':'Arial', 'size':'16', 'color':'black', 'weight':'normal',
              'verticalalignment':'bottom'} # Bottom vertical alignment for more space
axis_font = {'fontname':'Arial', 'size':'14'}

# Set the font properties (for use in legend)   
font_path = 'C:\Windows\Fonts\Arial.ttf'
font_prop = font_manager.FontProperties(fname=font_path, size=14)

ax = plt.subplot() # Jjust creates a plot

# Set the tick labels font
for label in (ax.get_xticklabels() + ax.get_yticklabels()):
    label.set_fontname('Arial')
    label.set_fontsize(13)

x = np.linspace(0, 10)
y = x + np.random.normal(x) # Just simulates some data

plt.plot(x, y, 'b+', label='Data points')
plt.xlabel("x axis", **axis_font)
plt.ylabel("y axis", **axis_font)
plt.title("Misc graph", **title_font)
plt.legend(loc='lower right', prop=font_prop, numpoints=1)
plt.text(0, 0, "Misc text", **title_font)
plt.show()

The benefit of this method is that, by having several font dictionaries, you can choose different fonts/sizes/weights/colours for the various titles, choose the font for the tick labels, and choose the font for the legend, all independently.

UPDATE:

I have worked out a slightly different, less cluttered approach that does away with font dictionaries, and allows any font on your system, even .otf fonts. To have separate fonts for each thing, just write more font_path and font_prop like variables. (Starts after importing modules)

# Set the font properties (can use more variable for more fonts)
font_path = 'C:\Windows\Fonts\AGaramondPro-Regular.otf'
font_prop = font_manager.FontProperties(fname=font_path, size=14)

ax = plt.subplot() # Just creates an empty plot

x = np.linspace(0, 10)
y = x + np.random.normal(x)
plt.plot(x, y, 'b+', label='Data points')

for label in (ax.get_xticklabels() + ax.get_yticklabels()):
    label.set_fontproperties(font_prop)
    label.set_fontsize(13) # Size here overrides font_prop

plt.title("Exponentially decaying oscillations", fontproperties=font_prop,
          size=16, verticalalignment='bottom') # Size here overrides font_prop
plt.xlabel("Time", fontproperties=font_prop)
plt.ylabel("Amplitude", fontproperties=font_prop)
plt.legend(loc='lower right', prop=font_prop)
plt.text(0, 0, "Misc text", fontproperties=font_prop)
plt.show()

Hopefully this is a comprehensive answer :) If you have a legend title, god forbid, I can't help you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.