Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use DOMDocument and XPath to search an HTML document using PHP. I want to search by a number such as '022222', and it should return the value of the corresponding h2 tag. Any thoughts on how this would be done?

The HTML document can be found at http://pastie.org/1211369

share|improve this question
    
So in this case you would want to get Item 2, right? –  Gumbo Oct 10 '10 at 17:08
    
Exactly, sorry should have given an example in the question –  RichW Oct 10 '10 at 17:31
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a more readable and maintainable XPath expression that selects the desired node. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 11 '10 at 2:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this?

$sxml = simplexml_load_string($data);
$find = "022222";

print_r($sxml->xpath("//li[.='".$find."']/../../../div[@class='content']/h2"));

It returns:

Array
(
    [0] => SimpleXMLElement Object
        (
            [0] => Item 2
        )

)

//li[.='xxx'] will locate the li your searching for. Then we use ../ to step up three levels, before we descend into the content-div, as specified by div[@class='content']. Finally we choose the h2 child.

Just FYI, here's how to do it using DOM:

$dom = new DOMDocument();
$dom->loadXML($data);

$find = "022222";

$xpath = new DOMXpath($dom);
$res = $xpath->evaluate("//li[.='".$find."']/../../../div[@class='content']/h2");

if ($res->length > 0) {
    $node = $res->item(0);
    echo $node->firstChild->wholeText."\n";
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Brilliant, works perfectly. I had no idea you could traverse the DOM using ../ Thanks! –  RichW Oct 10 '10 at 17:44
    
@RichW, You're welcome. :) –  Emil H Oct 10 '10 at 17:48
I want to search by a number such as '022222', and it should return the value of the corresponding h2 tag. Any thoughts on how this would be done?

The HTML document can be found at http://pastie.org/1211369

To start with, the text at the provided link is not a well-formed XML or XHtml document and cannot be directly parsed with XPath.

Therefore I have wrapped it inan <html> element.

On this XML document one of the XPath expressions that selects exactly the wanted text node is:

/*/div[div/ul/li = '022222']/div[@class='content']/h2/text()

Among other advantages, this XPath expression doesn't use any reverse axes and is thus more readable.

The complete XML document on which this XPath expression is evaluated is the following:

<html>
 <div class="item">
    <div class="content"><h2>Item 1</h2></div>
    <div class="phone">
        <ul class="phone-single">
            <li>01234 567890</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
 </div>

 <div class="item">
    <div class="content"><h2>Item 2</h2></div>
    <div class="phone">
        <ul class="phone-multiple">
        <li>022222</li>
            <li>033333</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
 </div>

 <div class="item">
    <div class="content"><h2>Item 3</h2></div>
    <div class="phone">
        <ul class="phone-single">
            <li>02345 678901</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
 </div>

 <div class="item">
    <div class="content"><h2>Item 4</h2></div>
    <div class="phone">
        <ul class="phone-multiple">
            <li>099999999</li>
            <li>088888888</li>
        </ul>
    </div>
 </div>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Another great example Dimitre, thanks for this. I see what you mean about it being more readable. The reason the XML wasn't well formed is that it's simply a snippet of a document, the actual XML is a very messy document that seemed pointless to post on here. –  RichW Oct 21 '10 at 20:10
1  
+1, That's a much cleaner xpath expression than mine. It's been a while since I worked regularly with xpath, so it seem like I've forgotten a bit. :) –  Emil H Oct 22 '10 at 0:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.