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Say I need to call a javascript file in the <head> of an ERb template. My instinct is to do the usual:

<head>
<%= javascript_include_tag :defaults %> <!-- For example -->
</head>

in my application's layout. The problem of course becoming that these javascript files are loaded into every page in my application, regardless of whether or not they are needed for the page being viewed.

So what I'm wondering is if there's a good way of loading a javascript into the the headers of, for example, all ERb templates found only in a specific directory.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 105 down vote accepted

I would use content_for.

For instance, specify the place to insert it in the application layout:

<head>
<title>Merry Christmas!</title>
<%= yield(:head) -%>
</head>

And send it there from a view:

<%- content_for(:head) do -%>
<%= javascript_include_tag :defaults -%>
<%- end -%>
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just saved my day. Thanks! –  AnApprentice Oct 5 '10 at 3:35
1  
Why the <%- instead of <%= ? Is this some special syntax? –  Martin Konicek Jul 24 '11 at 12:02
2  
In older versions of rails the "<%-" prevents erb from generating unnecessary spaces before the <% tag. This is happens automatically with newer versions –  Gu1234 Aug 17 '11 at 17:52
1  
This answer helped, but I prefer a shorter implementation with just one line: <% content_for(:head) { javascript_include_tag :this_file, :that_file, :more_files } %> –  MaffooClock Feb 3 '12 at 17:32
7  
@MaffooClock: And if you want even shorter you can remove the curly brackets and just do <% content_for :head, javascript_include_tag(:this_file, :that_file, :more_files) %>. See? Saved two chars! ;-) –  Ivan Navarrete Feb 12 '12 at 18:35

I feel there's nothing wrong including all yr defaults since they can then be cached on user's browser.

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10  
what about if you have includes that are only applicable to the admin part of a website? –  Ali Dec 6 '09 at 12:33

I would suggest not to add javascript in the header as it causes to load the page slower. Rather load the js at the bottom of the page, which is faster. http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html#js_bottom

<body>
 ....
  <%= yield(:js) -%>
</body>

And send it there from a view:

<%- content_for(:js) do -%>
  <%= javascript_include_tag :defaults -%>
<%- end -%>
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I usually have the following in the layout file:

<head>
  <%= javascript_include_tag :defaults %> <!-- For example -->
  <%= @extra_head_content %>
</head>

And then in the views:

<% (@extra_head_content ||= "") += capture do %>
  <%= other_content %>
<% end %>

See the API documentation for #capture

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