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Question: Why can't I push elements into a 2d array that's inside of a while loop that parses through a SQL result set?

I need some help here as to why this happens. The way data is stored into a 2d array can be done several ways, but for my purposes, I need to use the push method.

Here's some code that works:

my @tt = (0,1,2,3);
my @t;
push (@t,\@tt);
print "[0][0]:".$t[0][0]."\n";
print "[0][1]:".$t[0][1]."\n";
print "[0][2]:".$t[0][2]."\n";
print "[0][3]:".$t[0][3]."\n";
@tt = (4,5,6,7);
push (@t,\@tt);
print "[1][0]:".$t[1][0]."\n";
print "[1][1]:".$t[1][1]."\n";
print "[1][2]:".$t[1][2]."\n";
print "[1][3]:".$t[1][3]."\n";

The output is:

-------------------------
[0][0]:0
[0][1]:1
[0][2]:2
[0][3]:3
[1][0]:4
[1][1]:5
[1][2]:6
[1][3]:7


Here's the problem I'm having

I'm running some SQL to build up a result set with X number of columns. To store the data into my array, I figured I could use the same syntax as above:

while (@results=$sth->fetchrow_array())
{
    push(@stu_pool,\@results);
} 

I tested the SQL and checked the result set, so the problem is not related to that. I have also reverted back to the long-hand approach which leaves me with my desired end result. Instead of using push(@stu_pool,\@results); I used this code inside the loop:

$stu_pool[$index][0] = $results[0];
$stu_pool[$index][1] = $results[1];
$stu_pool[$index][2] = $results[2];
$stu_pool[$index][3] = $results[3];
$stu_pool[$index][4] = $results[4];
$stu_pool[$index][5] = $results[5];
$stu_pool[$index][6] = $results[6];
$index++;

So what is preventing me from pushing elements into this array? It works fine with the first example, but when I try to print out the elements, they are all blank. The code I'm using:

print "[0][0]:".$stu_pool[0][0]."\n";
print "[0][1]:".$stu_pool[0][1]."\n";
print "[0][2]:".$stu_pool[0][2]."\n";
print "[0][3]:".$stu_pool[0][3]."\n";
print "[1][0]:".$stu_pool[1][0]."\n";
print "[1][1]:".$stu_pool[1][1]."\n";
print "[1][2]:".$stu_pool[1][2]."\n";
print "[1][3]:".$stu_pool[1][3]."\n";

To repeat:

Why does the push method fail to work inside the while loop?

share|improve this question
1  
I am writing this as a comment because it is not an answer to your question, but it still has to be said: Copy-pasting the same line 6 times is a bad idea. Use a loop. And do yourself a favour and watch this talk: video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4037440245833870135 –  Aristotle Pagaltzis Oct 10 '10 at 21:09
    
I just put it like that as an example. It's straightforward and easy to read and doesn't add extra elements for people to inspect as a possible reason for the problem –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 21:20
    
each array contained in the second dimension of stu_pool has 7 elements in it besides –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 21:22
    
Well, monkey see monkey do. When people see code like this, they write code like this. –  brian d foy Oct 11 '10 at 18:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Let me change your first example a bit.

my @tt = (0,1,2,3);
my @t;
push (@t,\@tt);
@tt = (4,5,6,7);
push (@t,\@tt);
print "[0][0]:".$t[0][0]."\n";
print "[0][1]:".$t[0][1]."\n";
print "[0][2]:".$t[0][2]."\n";
print "[0][3]:".$t[0][3]."\n";
print "[1][0]:".$t[1][0]."\n";
print "[1][1]:".$t[1][1]."\n";
print "[1][2]:".$t[1][2]."\n";
print "[1][3]:".$t[1][3]."\n";

Output:

[0][0]:4
[0][1]:5
[0][2]:6
[0][3]:7
[1][0]:4
[1][1]:5
[1][2]:6
[1][3]:7

You're not copying @tt into @t. You're putting a reference to the variable @tt into @t. So when something else happens to @tt, it changes when fetched through @t as well. To really make a copy, you want push(@t,[@tt]) or @{$t[$i]} = @tt if $i is an appropriate index variable.

Or for the other example, try push(@stu_pool, [@results]);

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the clarification - I wasn't aware of what the `` did. I picked it up from an example I saw online when I was trying to find out how to do 2d arrays in Perl - also, thanks for the last line in your post. that's what I was really looking for –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 20:58
    
Could I also have used some combination of a foreach(@results) and the $_ variable to get the same effect? –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 21:33
    
@CheeseConQueso: I'm not entirely sure what you mean there, but I suspect the answer is "yes, but why introduce another loop when you don't need to?" –  aschepler Oct 10 '10 at 21:41
1  
Well, that only calls fetchrow_array once. And careful: @_ is not $_. Have you read perldoc perllol? [perldoc.perl.org/perllol.html ] –  aschepler Oct 10 '10 at 21:58
1  
Actually, now that I look at them again, I recommend reading perlreftut [ perldoc.perl.org/perlreftut.html ] before perllol. –  aschepler Oct 10 '10 at 22:10

There's only one @results -- you're making every element of @stu_pool a reference to the same @results, which (the last time the loop condition is checked) will eventually be set to contain ().

What you want is to add my: while (my @results = $sth->fetchrow_array) { will work just fine, because now each time through the loop, @results is a different array.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks... I follow that reasoning. My assumption for the behavior of this loop was that the elements of @results was being loaded with a single result row's fields and reset itself to the next row's fields on each iteration –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 20:54
    
@Cheese: that is correct, but the array reference (the actual thing you are storing) is not changed on each iteration. So you're just overwriting last row's results with the next results. –  Ether Oct 10 '10 at 21:37
    
@ether - I understand now, thanks. Are there any other secrets with regards to this specific area of variable usage/manipulation (for arrays or otherwise) that I should know about? Any good references/guides you know of? I'm teaching myself Perl as I go and get stuck at these intricacies –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 21:58
    
@Cheese: [perldoc perldata](http:/perldoc.perl.org/perldata.html), [perldoc perldsc](http:/perldoc.perl.org/perldsc.html), [perldoc perlreftut](http:/perldoc.perl.org/perlreftut.html). Also the books Beginning Perl, Intermediate Perl, Mastering Perl. –  Ether Oct 10 '10 at 23:16

Why loop at all? It's much easier to do:

my $results = $sth->fetchall_arrayref();

or if you insist on using an array variable:

my @results = @{$sth->fetchall_arrayref()};
share|improve this answer
    
" Can't locate object method "fetchall_arrayref" via package "sth" (perhaps you forgot to load "sth"?) " –  CheeseConQueso Oct 10 '10 at 22:24
    
That’s because he made the trivial mistake of leaving out the $ sigil on $sth. I fixed it. –  Aristotle Pagaltzis Oct 11 '10 at 5:20
    
Oops, sorry... Thanks for fixing. –  mscha Oct 11 '10 at 11:50

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