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I ran into this question when i was answering another guys question. How do compilers optimize the code? Can keywords like const, ... help? Beside the fact with volatiles and inline functions and how to optimize the code all by your self!

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closed as not a real question by Jens Gustedt, asveikau, Mad Scientist, bmargulies, Graviton Oct 12 '10 at 12:21

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This is my second day in stackoverflow, but I see the const optimization topic for the third time already... Why are programmers so obsessed with optimization especially when in most cases it is not needed? This is bound to be a dupe – Armen Tsirunyan Oct 10 '10 at 19:58
    
Very interesting question. Try reading en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compiler_optimization – usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ Oct 10 '10 at 20:01
    
@Armen: sorry if my question was annoying, it was just out of curiosity and nowhere to be found over the net. – A2B Oct 10 '10 at 20:05
    
@ djechelon: Thanks :D, I already have done that. I mean the very specific cases. You know, the cases which are concerned mostly with gcc. – A2B Oct 10 '10 at 20:06
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@linuxuser27: I think what @Armen was trying to say was "I most cases, [programmer-guided] optimization is not needed." Really, choosing the simplest and cleanest approach and algorithm for a problem has far more beneficial results than trying to squeeze an extra instruction through the CPU. – GManNickG Oct 10 '10 at 20:22
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Compilers are free to optimize code so long as they can guarantee the semantics of the code are not changed.

I would suggestion starting at the Compiler optimization wikipedia page as there are many different kinds of optimization that are performed at many different stages.

As you can see, modern compilers are very 'smart' at optimizing code (compiled C code is often faster than hand-written assembly unless the programmer really knows how to take advantage of all the specific processor instructions and quirks). As others have said, write for clarity first based on a good design.

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compilers can do that if they know what hardware their code is running in! sometimes should the GPU come in, they mess up. I recently wrote a code which used both cpu and gpu (cuda) and the bug was just that simple O2 optimization. When i turned it off, all things made sense. – A2B Oct 10 '10 at 20:13
    
@Green Code: Compilers are software too, so of course they are sometimes buggy. But for mature compilers, the output is usually correct and blazing fast compared to whatever most programmers could write on their own. – delnan Oct 10 '10 at 20:30
    
@Green Code: there are various level of optimizations. Some are machine independent, some not. Machine dependent may not be bug-less, especially for young architecture, simply because they haven't been tested extensively yet. CUDA brings a new difficulty too: suddenly there are parts of the code that should be optimized for CPU and others for GPU. None of the C++ compilers that I know of have been meant to optimize for two different architectures at once. – Matthieu M. Oct 11 '10 at 6:36
    
Compiler's aren't that smart. They can't even re-order a simple Boolean expression like (A && B && C && D) to optimize the short-circuiting. They play it safe, because they can't determine whether methods have side effects, and since they can't determine that, they can't safely re-order the expression. Since they aren't doing so, they aren't even bothering to calculate operand complexity at compile-time, nor do they profile the cost of evaluating the OPs to see which ones best trigger short-circuits and which ones are expensive and better to be short-circuited (i.e. ordered last). – Triynko Dec 1 '11 at 21:52

One very big thing you can do ( beyond what the compiler can do for you ) is to be aware of the cache. Since accessing the memory is really time expensive, the cache tries to help you by storing not only the data you accessed it but the nearby elements as well. This is why foo will run so much faster than bar:

array[ NUM_ROWS ][ NUM_COLS ];

foo() 
{
    int row, col;
    int sum = 0;

    // accesses the elements in the array continuously
    for ( row = 0; row < NUM_ROWS ; row++ ) 
    {
         for ( col = 0; col < NUM_COLS; col++ )
         {
              sum += array[ row ][ col ];
         }
    }
}

bar() 
{
    int row, col;
    int sum = 0;

    // skips from row to row ( big jumps that might miss the cache )
    for ( col = 0; col < NUM_COLS ; col++ ) 
    {
         for ( row = 0; row < NUM_ROWS; row++ )
         {
              sum += array[ row ][ col ];
         }
    }
}

Edit: Another thing to be aware of is repeated string concatenation. Done wrong, this can make code that otherwise seems to run in O( n ) actually be in O( n^2 ) - see an article on Joel on Software

Edit: s/disk/memory/

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What does your example code have to do with accessing the disk? – JeremyWeir Oct 10 '10 at 20:02
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being aware of the cache will save you a lot more than ++row :P @jayrdub: that involves an explanation of how memory actually works in the machine. Basically, array[ row ][ col ] is a call to main memory which is originally stored on the hard disk. Because the hard disk moves so much slower than the CPU, computers will store information in a 'cache' where it is easier to access. – Alex Reece Oct 10 '10 at 20:02
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I think you have a weird computer – JeremyWeir Oct 10 '10 at 20:06
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@Alex Reece - I don't think anyone is saying that. The objection is that you say "disk" when you are referring to memory. – asveikau Oct 10 '10 at 20:47
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@Alex: gcc (-floop-interchange) see gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Optimize-Options.html, and I think it's the one called loop-rotate in llvm: llvm.org/docs/Passes.html#loop-rotate – Matthieu M. Oct 11 '10 at 18:47

The rules of optimization:

  1. Don't do it
  2. Advanced Users Only: Don't do it yet

Edit: The quote (and other information, useful or not) can be found in the CodingHorror article: Hardware is cheap, programmers are expensive. It would be nice to find the 'origin' of this phrase/quote though.

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The question is not about manual optimization, but what compilers may do and how they do it. – DerKuchen Oct 10 '10 at 20:06
    
Hi, Thank you for your advice, but i guess i am on the edge of learning it completely so i don't wanna misunderstand it. – A2B Oct 10 '10 at 20:07
    
@DerKuchen: well, it's about both of those. – Michael Petrotta Oct 10 '10 at 20:11

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