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class CustomClass<T> where T: bool
{
    public CustomClass(T defaultValue)
    {
        init(defaultValue); // why can't the compiler just use void init(bool) here?
    }
    public void init(bool defaultValue)
    {

    }
    // public void init(int defaultValue) will be implemented later
}

Hello. This seems to be a simple question, but I couldn't find an answer on the Internet: Why won't the compiler use the init method? I simply want to provide different methods for different types.

Instead it prints the following error message: "The best overloaded method match for 'CustomClass.init(bool)' has some invalid arguments"

I would be glad about a hint.

Best regards, Chris

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3  
Why aren't you using public void init(T defaultValue) ? –  jcolebrand Oct 10 '10 at 22:33
5  
The compiler should complain much earlier: You can't do where T: bool. –  dtb Oct 10 '10 at 22:34
2  
What's the point of this?? Boolean is a sealed class and cannot be inherited from. So your T can only be a boolean. –  Aliostad Oct 10 '10 at 22:41
2  
@Chris, not sure what you're trying to achieve. The compiler is telling you that T != bool and there is no appropriate conversion from T to bool. I suspect that you do not have behaviours that are the same across multiple types and therefore a generic class is not the best solution. Have you thought about an interface (or base class) with implementations (or subclasses) for different types? Why are you trying to use a generic here? What is the problem you are trying to solve? –  Hamish Smith Oct 10 '10 at 22:43
1  
@Chris ~ then in the class constructor instead of just calling init(bool) test it for if (T is bool) init(bool) –  jcolebrand Oct 10 '10 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The compiler cannot use init(bool) because at compile-time it cannot know that T is bool. What you are asking for is dynamic dispatch — which method is actually being called depends on the run-time type of the argument and cannot be determined at compile-time.

You can achieve this in C# 4.0 by using the dynamic type:

class CustomClass<T>
{
    public CustomClass(T defaultValue)
    {
        init((dynamic)defaultValue);
    }
    private void init(bool defaultValue) { Console.WriteLine("bool"); }
    private void init(int defaultValue) { Console.WriteLine("int"); }
    private void init(object defaultValue) {
        Console.WriteLine("fallback for all other types that don’t have "+
                          "a more specific init()");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, This does appear to be what the OP is trying to get at. Also, interesting use of dynamic. I've occasionally wanted to use the switch statement with types and this seems like an interesting way of simulating the effect. –  Kirk Woll Oct 10 '10 at 22:52
    
Thank you very much for your quick reply. In my opinion it was possible to decide at compile time because the constructor calls with bool already existed in the program. The dynamic keyword is a nice feature. How would I solve this using C# 3.5? –  Chris Oct 10 '10 at 22:58
1  
@Chris: Just because you call the constructor with a bool doesn’t mean the compiler can emit a call to init(bool). You could call the same constructor with a different type argument from another assembly later! — Unfortunately, my solution only works with C# 4.0 and up. There is no C# 3.5. If you need to use C# 3.0 (or perhaps you mean .NET 3.5?) then your only option is to use a series of if ((object)defaultValue is bool) ... else .... –  Timwi Oct 10 '10 at 23:11
    
Right I mean .NET 3.5. Thank you very much for your support. –  Chris Oct 10 '10 at 23:16
    
Just what I was Looking for... Thank you... –  Arce Brito Oct 28 '10 at 23:06

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