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I have a complicated UI structure which is manipulated dynamically, and say I have an ui_state object where i keep user's latest UI states such as which tab was visible, what was inside that tab etc.

For instance:

var ui_states = {
  tabs : [
    {
      name     : "some tab",
      active   : true,
      children : { ... }
    },
    {
      name     : "some other tab",
      children : { ... }
    }
  ]
}

I keep this on html5 localStorage and when user refreshes the site it reopens the page the same. And everytime when the UI changes this object is changed accordingly. And just after changing it i need to run let's say updateLocalStorage() which is working perfectly.

My question is for this flow, can i create a custom event to my ui_states object something like ui_states.addEventListener('onchange', function(){ // do stuff }) to not to run that updateLocalStorage() function every time when i manipulate the object?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

You're mixing up JavaScript programming with DOM programming. Events are purely a DOM concept. JS objects do not support event handlers.

The only way to do it is to create getters and setters. There are ways to do this with special properties, but unfortunately, browser support is a bit maybe. The other way to do it is using explicit methods and private variables. This is possible but a little complex.

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thanks for that. –  KakambaWeb Oct 11 '10 at 3:02
    
I disagree. Events are absolutely not DOM only. But a concept to loosely couple components which can be implemented in "Dom-Less"-JS as well. –  pascal betz Oct 6 at 17:38

bob.js framework supports events for pure JavaScript objects. You can either create an object representation of the event that supports handler registration/de-registration, or you can tell bob.js to create functions on your object. Here's the second approach (as the example is cleaner to read):

var DataListener = function() { 
    var fire = bob.event.namedEvent(this, 'received'); 
    this.start = function(count) { 
        for (var i = 0; i < count; i++) { 
            fire(i + 1); 
        } 
    }; 
}; 
var listener = new DataListener(); 
listener.add_received(function(data) { 
    console.log('data received: ' + data); 
}); 
listener.start(5); 
// Output: 
// data received: 1 
// data received: 2 
// data received: 3 
// data received: 4 
// data received: 5
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