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How do I match a regex where a line break can happen anywhere?

For example, if I am trying to match "thousands of turtle eggs", it should match all the following cases. (or even the cases when line breaks are inside the words.)

Scientists have revealed that a mammoth effort to move *thousands of turtle eggs* from beaches around the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have saved almost 15,000 of the reptiles.   

Scientists have revealed that a mammoth effort to move *thousands 
of turtle eggs* from beaches around the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have saved almost 15,000 of the reptiles.

Scientists have revealed that a mammoth effort to move *thousands of 
turtle eggs* from beaches around the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have saved almost 15,000 of the reptiles.

Scientists have revealed that a mammoth effort to move *thousands of turtle 
eggs* from beaches around the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill may have saved almost 15,000 of the reptiles.
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next time, please provide us info about which regex library, or which application you are using, because different library/app would give a different correct answer. You could also give a signal by choosing more than one appropriate tags. –  Vantomex Oct 11 '10 at 4:57
    
@Vantomex Does the regex library matter? I could do with a generic answer, not tied to any library/app. - Thanks –  rest_day Oct 13 '10 at 1:44
    
not every regex lib supports possessive quantifier, atomic grouping, etc. they can be used to optimize the speed of regex parsing by the library. Also, they are so many rule differences to achieve the same result between regex libraries. –  Vantomex Oct 13 '10 at 1:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  /thousands\s+of\s+turtle\s+eggs/

or this version to ensure thousands and eggs are not part of another word (like ...eggsbath)

  /\bthousands\s+of\s+turtle\s+eggs\b/
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What about the cases where line break might occur within the words? –  rest_day Oct 13 '10 at 1:46
    
Just add that possibility between the letters: /\bt[\r\n]*h[\r\n]*o[\r\n]*... –  ring0 Oct 13 '10 at 9:09
    
ok... was thinking if there were any other solutions. :) –  rest_day Oct 15 '10 at 9:45

You can use the flag "s" to match all line breaks.

If you use the regex "/reptiles..*?sc/gis" it will match "reptiles.sc"

You can try this link

This is a online regex editor

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use the 's' switch. Then ^$ becomes start and end of the the whole string and newlines are considered white spaces. So as long as you use \s for matching the gaps between words. eg:

#thousands\sof\sturtle\seggs#si

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Sorry, but you're way off. Newlines are always considered whitespace, and \s always matches them. What the s switch does is allow the dot (.) to match newlines, which it doesn't do by default. This was originally (and unfortunately) called single-line mode, but it's more commonly known as dot-matches-all or DOTALL mode today. The s switch has no effect on the anchors (^ and $). See the "Dot" and "Anchors" section of this tutorial for details: regular-expressions.info/tutorial.html –  Alan Moore Oct 11 '10 at 4:59
    
thanks. I didn't know that, i just assumed it was the way i mentioned it. I'll look into it. :) –  Karthick Oct 11 '10 at 7:37

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