Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just see the below codes

code 1

public class A {
  static int add(int i,int j) {
   return(i+j);
  }
}

public class B extends A {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    short s=9;
    System.out.println(add(s,6));
  }
}

code 2

public class A {
  int add(int i,int j) {
    return(i+j);
  }
}

public class B extends A {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    A a=new A();
    short s=9;
    System.out.println(a.add(s,6));
  }
}

Now pls explain what is the difference between these codes. Both generate 15 as answer

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 36 down vote accepted

A static method belongs to the class itself and a non-static (aka instance) method belongs to each object that is generated from that class. If your method does something that doesn't depend on the individual characteristics of its class, make it static (it will make the program's footprint smaller). Otherwise, it should be non-static.

Example:

Class Foo {
    int i;

    public Foo(int i) { 
       this.i = i;
    }

    public static String method1() {
       return "An example string that doesn't depend on i (an instance variable)";
    }

    public int method2() {
       return this.i+1; // Depends on i
    }
}

You can call static methods like this: Foo.method1(). If you try that with method2, it will fail. But this will work: Foo bar = new Foo(1); bar.method2();

share|improve this answer

Static methods are useful if you have only one instance (situation, circumstance) where you're going to use the method, and you don't need multiple copies (objects). For example, if you're writing a method that logs onto one and only one web site, downloads the weather data, and then returns the values, you could write it as static because you can hard code all the necessary data within the method and you're not going to have multiple instances or copies. You can then access the method statically using one of the following:

MyClass.myMethod();
this.myMethod();
myMethod();

Non-static methods are used if you're going to use your method to create multiple copies. For example, if you want to download the weather data from Boston, Miami, and Los Angeles, and if you can do so from within your method without having to individually customize the code for each separate location, you then access the method non-statically:

MyClass boston = new MyClassConstructor(); 
boston.myMethod("bostonURL");

MyClass miami = new MyClassConstructor(); 
miami.myMethod("miamiURL");

MyClass losAngeles = new MyClassConstructor();
losAngeles.myMethod("losAngelesURL");

In the above example, Java creates three separate objects and memory locations from the same method that you can individually access with the "boston", "miami", or "losAngeles" reference. You can't access any of the above statically, because MyClass.myMethod(); is a generic reference to the method, not to the individual objects that the non-static reference created.

If you run into a situation where the way you access each location, or the way the data is returned, is sufficiently different that you can't write a "one size fits all" method without jumping through a lot of hoops, you can better accomplish your goal by writing three separate static methods, one for each location.

share|improve this answer

Here, Understanding Instance and Class Members, its explained very well.

share|improve this answer

A static method belongs to the class and a non-static method belongs to an object of a class. That is, a non-static method can only be called on an object of a class that it belongs to. A static method can however be called both on the class as well as an object of the class. A static method can access only static members. A non-static method can access both static and non-static members because at the time when the static method is called, the class might not be instantiated (if it is called on the class itself). In the other case, a non-static method can only be called when the class has already been instantiated. A static method is shared by all instances of the class. These are some of the basic differences. I would also like to point out an often ignored difference in this context. Whenever a method is called in C++/Java/C#, an implicit argument (the 'this' reference) is passed along with/without the other parameters. In case of a static method call, the 'this' reference is not passed as static methods belong to a class and hence do not have the 'this' reference.

Reference:Static Vs Non-Static methods

share|improve this answer

A static method belongs to the class and a non-static method belongs to an object of a class. I am giving one example how it creates difference between outputs.

public class DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic {

  static int count = 0;
  private int count1 = 0;

  public DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic(){
    count1 = count1+1;
  }

  public int getCount1() {
    return count1;
  }

  public void setCount1(int count1) {
    this.count1 = count1;
  }

  public static int countStaticPosition() {
    count = count+1; 
    return count;
    /*
     * one can not use non static variables in static method.so if we will
     * return count1 it will give compilation error. return count1;
     */
  }
}

public class StaticNonStaticCheck {

  public static void main(String[] args){
    for(int i=0;i<4;i++) {
      DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic p =new DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic();
      System.out.println("static count position is " +DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic.count);
        System.out.println("static count position is " +p.getCount1());
        System.out.println("static count position is " +DifferenceBetweenStaticAndNonStatic.countStaticPosition());

        System.out.println("next case: ");
        System.out.println(" ");

    }
}

}

Now output will be:::

static count position is 0
static count position is 1
static count position is 1
next case: 

static count position is 1
static count position is 1
static count position is 2
next case: 

static count position is 2
static count position is 1
static count position is 3
next case:  
share|improve this answer

Well, more technically speaking, the difference between a static method and a virtual method is the way the are linked.

A traditional "static" method like in most non OO languages gets linked/wired "statically" to its implementation at compile time. That is, if you call method Y() in program A, and link your program A with library X that implements Y(), the address of X.Y() is hardcoded to A, and you can not change that.

In OO languages like JAVA, "virtual" methods are resolved "late", at run-time, and you need to provide an instance of a class. So in, program A, to call virtual method Y(), you need to provide an instance, B.Y() for example. At runtime, every time A calls B.Y() the implementation called will depend on the instance used, so B.Y() , C.Y() etc... could all potential provide different implementations of Y() at runtime.

Why will you ever need that? Because that way you can decouple your code from the dependencies. For example, say program A is doing "draw()". With a static language, thats it, but with OO you will do B.draw() and the actual drawing will depend on the type of object B, which, at runtime, can change to square a circle etc. That way your code can draw multiple things with no need to change, even if new types of B are provided AFTER the code was written. Nifty -

share|improve this answer

Generally

static: no need to create object we can directly call using

ClassName.methodname()

Non Static: we need to create a object like

ClassName obj=new ClassName()
obj.methodname();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for editing –  murthy naika k Sep 8 at 5:27

If your method is related to the object's characteristics, you should define it as non-static method. Otherwise, you can define your method as static, and you can use it independently from object.

share|improve this answer

Basic difference is non static members are declared with out using the keyword 'static'

All the static members (both variables and methods) are referred with the help of class name. Hence the static members of class are also called as class reference members or class members..

In order to access the non static members of a class we should create reference variable . reference variable store an object..

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.