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Should I always pass a std::string by const reference to a function if all that is done inside that function is to copy that string? Additionally, what is the difference (perf or otherwise) between passing by value and passing by reference? As I understand, one uses operator= and the other copy constructor. Is that the case?

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when you pass by reference, no copy is made. when you pass by value, copy constructor is used. –  Anycorn Oct 11 '10 at 5:23

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up vote 16 down vote accepted

Should I always pass a std::string by const reference to a function if all that is done inside that function is to copy that string?

No. If you are going to just copy the string inside of the function, you should pass by value. This allows the compiler to perform several optimizations. For more, read Dave Abraham's "Want Speed? Pass by Value."

What is the difference (perf or otherwise) between passing by value and passing by reference? As I understand, one uses operator= and the other copy constructor. Is that the case?

No, that is not at all the case. A reference is not an object; it is a reference to an object. When you pass by value, a copy of the object being passed is made. When you pass by reference, a reference to the existing object is made and there is no copy. A good introductory C++ book will explain these basic concepts in detail. It is critical to understand the basics if you want to develop software in C++.

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I think it depends on what he means by making a copy. If it's to, say, a member then it should be passed as a reference and just copied to the member. In C++0x, do it by value and std::move it into the member. –  GManNickG Oct 11 '10 at 5:34
    
Instead of using std::move you could use the swap method (or std::swap) to get a similiar behaviour, when you can't/don't use c++0x –  Grizzly Oct 11 '10 at 13:52
    
Is there a combination of compiler and example code where passing by value actually performs better? I would like to know. –  Johan Kotlinski Oct 13 '10 at 21:01

Don't believe everything you read on the internet. It is better to pass by const reference. To give proof, I wrote a test program...

test.cpp:

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

void foo(std::string s);
void bar(const std::string& s);

int main() {
    const std::string s("test string");

    clock_t start = clock();
    for (int it = 0; it < 1000000; ++it)
        foo(s);
    std::cout << "foo took " << (clock() - start) << " cycles" << std::endl;

    start = clock();
    for (int it = 0; it < 1000000; ++it)
        bar(s);
    std::cout << "bar took " << (clock() - start) << " cycles" << std::endl;
}

aux.cpp:

#include <string>
std::string mystring;

void foo(std::string s) { mystring = s; }
void bar(const std::string& s) { mystring = s; }

Compiled with 'g++ -O3 test.cpp aux.cpp' and got the printout:

foo took 93044 cycles
bar took 10245 cycles

Passing by reference is faster by an order of magnitude.

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Thanks, I'll try it out myself :) –  nakiya Oct 13 '10 at 7:12
    
In Visual Studio 2012: "foo took 3701 cycles bar took 1110 cycles" –  nergeia Jan 22 '14 at 12:02
    
With g++ 4.8.1 on x86_64 I get 4130 vs. 1820. The gap is closing. –  John Kugelman Mar 19 '14 at 14:41

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