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I am not asking difference between them, my question is when we need to use "Union All" ?

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Thanks, All of your answer say that there are only two main point 1.) Duplicate rows and 2). Performance. It mean that we can use any one of them, so i cant understand why we can not we use union in this query. with tempData as ( select 32 as col1, char(32) as col2 union all select col1+1, char(col1+1) from tempData where col1 < 127 ) select * from tempData –  Jeevan Bhatt Oct 11 '10 at 7:28
    
@Jeevan Bhatt - What happens when you use a 'UNION' instead of 'UNION ALL' in your query? And what database are you using? –  Bob Jarvis Oct 11 '10 at 11:01
    
@Jeevan Bhatt - having looked a bit at your query I believe that there are some syntax errors which are preventing it from executing. The first subquery in the CTE lacks a FROM clause, and the second subquery refers to the CTE within the CTE, which is not allowed. What is your query trying to accomplish? –  Bob Jarvis Oct 11 '10 at 11:06
    
@Bob- I am using SQL Server 2008, and if i use 'union' instead of 'union all' it gives me error: Recursive common table expression 'tempData' does not contain a top-level UNION ALL operator. –  Jeevan Bhatt Oct 11 '10 at 11:08
    
@Jeevan Bhatt - apparently SQL Server 2008 allows recursive CTE's, but I've only got Oracle to test with and it appears that Oracle does not allow recursive CTE's. Thus, I can't be of much help here. However, the error message seems to indicate that in SQL Server 2008 the first UNION operator in a recursive CTE must be a UNION ALL. Good luck. –  Bob Jarvis Oct 11 '10 at 11:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You would use UNION ALL when you really do need the multiple 'copies' of rows that would otherwise be removed when using UNION. It can also be faster on the query end, since the DB engine does not need to determine what are duplicates between the result sets.

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1  
+1 for specifying a possible scenario of UNION ALL –  Christian Oct 11 '10 at 7:02
3  
+1 for mentioning the performance - this is almost critical, one needs to understand the implications of UNION vs UNION ALL for bigger tables, where UNION will perform orders of magnitude slower then UNION ALL for large resultsets (since removing duplicates in most cases mean building temporary index; for smaller resultsets this will not be so expensive, the size of the resultset is the number of rows returned) –  Unreason Oct 11 '10 at 7:10
1  
I would say "can tolerate" multiple copies as opposed to "need". For example, when you say WHERE ForeignKey IN (SELECT Id FROM view1 UNION ALL SELECT Id FROM view2). You don't need both, but you can tolerate both –  Mark Sowul Jun 22 '12 at 18:33
    
@mark that's a good addition. –  Andrew Barber Jun 22 '12 at 22:44
  • UNION will remove duplicates
  • UNION ALL does not remove duplicates

Example

SELECT 1 AS foo
UNION
SELECT 1 AS foo

= one row

SELECT 1 AS foo
UNION ALL
SELECT 1 AS foo

= two rows
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1  
If you were doing lots of JOINs and had redundant rows, would you use GROUP BY instead of UNION? And what's the difference between UNION and DISTINCT? –  meder Oct 11 '10 at 7:05
    
@meder: GROUP BY to remove duplicates is abuse: it's for aggregates. DISTINCT is per SELECT. That is, I could have SELECT DISTINCT.. UNION ALL SELECT ... if needed. This means de-duplicate 1st clause but take all rows on UNION. –  gbn Oct 11 '10 at 7:25

An example will make it clear:

mysql> select * from tmp1;
+------+
| a    |
+------+
| foo1 |
| foo2 |
+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from tmp2;
+------+
| a    |
+------+
| foo2 |
| foo3 |
| foo4 |
+------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from tmp1 union select * from tmp2;
+------+
| a    |
+------+
| foo1 |
| foo2 |   # DUPLICATES REMOVED.
| foo3 |
| foo4 |
+------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from tmp1 union all select * from tmp2;
+------+
| a    |
+------+
| foo1 |
| foo2 |
| foo2 |    # DUPLICATES NOT REMOVED.
| foo3 |
| foo4 |
+------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Coming to the question of When to use UNION ALL?

If you don't care that result set has duplicate rows or if you know there won't be any duplicates then use UNION ALL instead of UNION.

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When you need to use them depends on your requirements. The difference between UNION and UNION ALL is that UNION ALL doesn't remove duplicate rows.

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Union all is used to join multiple data set into a single data set but it does not remove duplicates

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You use UNION ALL to concatenate (append) two result sets into a single result set when they have the same columns (number and type).

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When we do not need to exclude duplicated rows from recordset

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Because the result will be a table, and every table should have a key, and UNION ensures unique rows, you should in theory always use UNION. However, because UNION ALL does not ensure unique rows, UNION ALL can perform better and therefore may be preferred in practise if you can be sure that both tables already contain unique rows.

The same logic applies to the choice between SELECT DISTINCT and SELECT ALL, BTW.

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BY default UNION will eliminate duplicate values. If you replace UNION with UNIONALL then it will not eliminate the duplicate values any more. :)

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Why Union or Union all ?

Ans: If you are looking some data from two or more different tables (I mean, by relationally) then you can use it.

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