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As per title, how do I do that? Here is my code:

var http = require('http');
var client = http.createClient(80, 'www.example.com'); // to access this url i need to put basic auth.

var request = client.request('GET', '/',
  {'host': 'www.example.com'});
request.end();
request.on('response', function (response) {
  console.log('STATUS: ' + response.statusCode);
  console.log('HEADERS: ' + JSON.stringify(response.headers));
  response.setEncoding('utf8');
  response.on('data', function (chunk) {
    console.log('BODY: ' + chunk);
  });
});
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3  
http.createClient is deprecated. Use 'http.request' instead. –  tomwrong Sep 7 '12 at 10:19

5 Answers 5

You have to set the Authorization field in the header.

It contains the authentication type, Basic in this casee and the username:password combination which gets encoded in Base64:

var username = 'Test';
var password = '123';
var auth = 'Basic ' + new Buffer(username + ':' + password).toString('base64');

// auth is: 'Basic VGVzdDoxMjM='

var header = {'Host': 'www.example.com', 'Authorization': auth};
var request = client.request('GET', '/', header);
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1  
thanks ... but i dont know why the string need to encode to base64 ... –  de_3 Oct 12 '10 at 6:39
1  
That's just how the whole thing works. The server expects the data to be encoded in Base64. –  Ivo Wetzel Oct 12 '10 at 10:09
22  
This should be accepted. –  Till Dec 9 '10 at 17:46
    
What's 'client' in this example? –  Steven Soroka Jul 19 '12 at 18:14
    
oh.. it's in the question. duh. nm. –  Steven Soroka Jul 19 '12 at 18:26

An easier solution is to use the user:pass@host format directly in the URL.

Using the request library:

var request = require('request'),
    username = "john",
    password = "1234",
    url = "http://" + username + ":" + password + "@www.example.com";

request(
    {
        url : url
    },
    function (error, response, body) {
        // Do more stuff with 'body' here
    }
);

I've written a little blogpost about this as well.

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2  
This is not ideal advice: any logging of URLs on either the client or server side could expose password values - this is a widely known security attack vector. I strongly recommend that no-one do this. Header values are better, and not using Basic authentication - in favor of Digest authentication or OAuth 1.0a (for example) is even better. This form of identification has also been deprecated in URIs in RFC 3986. –  Les Hazlewood Jan 14 at 4:38

From Node.js http.request API Docs you could use something similar to

var http = require('http');

var request = http.request({'hostname': 'www.example.com',
                            'auth': 'user:password'
                           }, 
                           function (response) {
                             console.log('STATUS: ' + response.statusCode);
                             console.log('HEADERS: ' + JSON.stringify(response.headers));
                             response.setEncoding('utf8');
                             response.on('data', function (chunk) {
                               console.log('BODY: ' + chunk);
                             });
                           });
request.end();
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This is the modern-day answer. –  David Aug 15 '13 at 9:08

for what it's worth I'm using node.js 0.6.7 on OSX and I couldn't get 'Authorization':auth to work with our proxy, it needed to be set to 'Proxy-Authorization':auth my test code is:

var http = require("http");
var auth = 'Basic ' + new Buffer("username:password").toString('base64');
var options = {
    host: 'proxyserver',
    port: 80,
    method:"GET",
    path: 'http://www.google.com',
    headers:{
        "Proxy-Authorization": auth,
        Host: "www.google.com"
    } 
};
http.get(options, function(res) {
    console.log(res);
    res.pipe(process.stdout);
});
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1  
For the edification of future readers: Thats because you are authenticating with your proxy server instead of authenticating with destination webserver (google). If you had needed to authenticate with the destination server then the Authorization header would be what you want to use. –  Maks Jul 2 '13 at 4:50
    
Yes but often you need to do both so this is a solid answer –  Mond Raymond Feb 24 at 10:59

I came across this recently. Which among Proxy-Authorization and Authorization headers to set depends on the server the client is talking to. If it is a Webserver, you need to set Authorization and if it a proxy, you have to set the Proxy-Authorization header

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