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I need to set the port of a HttpRequest. This is the port the Request is coming FROM.

Normal HTTP scenario:

Request: 127.0.0.1:6745 --> www.stackoverflow.com Response: 1227.0.0.1:6745 <-- www.stackoverflow.com

Request: 127.0.0.1:8096 --> www.stackoverflow.com Response: 1227.0.0.1:8096 <-- www.stackoverflow.com

My scenario:

Request: 127.0.0.1:6745 --> www.stackoverflow.com Response: 1227.0.0.1:6745 <-- www.stackoverflow.com

Request: 127.0.0.1:6745 --> www.stackoverflow.com Response: 1227.0.0.1:6745 <-- www.stackoverflow.com

The request must always come from a defined port. Is this even possible in the HTTP protocol? If yes, how do I use the WebRequest class in the .NEt framework? Or do I have to use manual sockets?

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TCP/IP has never worked like you want it to. It would be stupid if it did. –  leppie Oct 11 '10 at 10:22
    
It was not my idea, a third party wants our ip address and port number in order to allow us to consume their HTTP XML service. –  IceHeat Oct 11 '10 at 11:37

2 Answers 2

What do you mean by requesting port? If it is the temporary port assigned by the OS I don't think that you have any control over it with WebRequest. IMHO it would be better to leave this management to the operating system or you could run into some conflicts with other applications.

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Ok. How about just findout out what port was used by WebRequest? Is there a way to determine this after the request is made? –  AlanKley May 17 '11 at 20:57

Switch to a WebClient instead of HttpWebRequest since it should keep the connection alive for a period of time.

Do note that HTTP was not built to keep connections open. The connection will always be closed after a a period of idle time.

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