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Take the following class as an example:

class Sometype
{
    int someValue;

    public Sometype(int someValue)
    {
        this.someValue = someValue;
    }
}

I then want to create an instance of this type using reflection:

Type t = typeof(Sometype);
object o = Activator.CreateInstance(t);

Normally this will work, however because SomeType has not defined a parameterless constructor, the call to Activator.CreateInstance will throw an exception of type MissingMethodException with the message "No parameterless constructor defined for this object." Is there an alternative way to still create an instance of this type? It'd be kinda sucky to add parameterless constructors to all my classes.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 55 down vote accepted

I originally posted this answer here, but here is a reprint since this isn't the exact same question but has the same answer:

FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject() will create an instance without calling a constructor. I found this class by using Reflector and digging through some of the core .Net serialization classes.

I tested it using the sample code below and it looks like it works great:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;

namespace NoConstructorThingy
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass myClass = (MyClass)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(MyClass)); //does not call ctor
            myClass.One = 1;
            Console.WriteLine(myClass.One); //write "1"
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    public class MyClass
    {
        public MyClass()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MyClass ctor called.");
        }

        public int One
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }
}
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Awesome, looks like that's exactly what I need. I assume uninitialized means all its memory will be set to zeros? (Similar to how structs are instantiated) –  Aistina Dec 24 '08 at 2:04
10  
-1. Don't use undocumented classes to do shady things with your constructors. Use the overload of CreateInstance to create a properly initialized object, as indicated in iik's answer. –  JSBձոգչ Nov 19 '10 at 21:41
10  
@JSBangs, That sucks you are dinging a perfectly legitimate answer. Your comment and the other answer doesn't actually address the question asked. If you feel like you have a better answer then provide one. But the answer I provided highlight how to use a documented class in the same way other serialization classes use this code. –  Jason Jackson Nov 21 '10 at 20:43
16  
@JSBangs FormatterServices (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) is not undocumented. –  Sandeep Datta Dec 28 '10 at 6:53
2  

Use this overload of the CreateInstance method:

public static Object CreateInstance(
    Type type,
    params Object[] args
)

Creates an instance of the specified type using the constructor that best matches the specified parameters.

See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wcxyzt4d.aspx

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2  
Thanks that worked great and very clean and simple –  Jon Dec 11 '09 at 15:15

FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject not allow to create uninitialized string. You may get exception: System.ArgumentException: Uninitialized Strings cannot be created.

Please keep this in mind.

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Thanks for the heads up, but I'm already handling strings and basic types separately. –  Aistina Jan 15 '10 at 15:14

Good answers but unusable on the dot net compact framework. Here is a solution that will work on CF.Net...

class Test
{
    int _myInt;

    public Test(int myInt)
    {
        _myInt = myInt;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "My int = " + _myInt.ToString();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var ctor = typeof(Test).GetConstructor(new Type[] { typeof(int) });
        var obj = ctor.Invoke(new object[] { 10 });
        Console.WriteLine(obj);
    }
}
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1  
This is the way I'd call a non-default constructor. I'm not sure I'd ever want to create an object without calling any constructor at all. –  Rory MacLeod Feb 18 '10 at 18:56
1  
You may want to create an object without calling constructors if you are writing custom serializers. –  Sandeep Datta Feb 21 '10 at 10:59
1  
Yup, that's the exact use case scenario this question was for :) –  Aistina May 14 '10 at 16:17
    
@Aistina Perhaps you could add this information to the question? Most people would be against creating objects without calling their ctors and would take the time to argue with you about that, but your use case actually justifies it, so I think it is very relevant to the question itself. –  julealgon Oct 24 '13 at 15:23

When I benchmarked performance of (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T)) it was slower. At the same time compiled expressions would give you great speed improvements though they work only for types with default constructor. I took a hybrid approach:

public static class New<T>
{
    public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Creator();

    static Func<T> Creator()
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if (t == typeof(string))
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.Constant(string.Empty)).Compile();

        if (t.HasDefaultConstructor())
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(t)).Compile();

        return () => (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t);
    }
}

public static bool HasDefaultConstructor(this Type t)
{
    return t.IsValueType || t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null;
}

This means the create expression is effectively cached and incurs penalty only the first time the type is loaded. Will handle value types too in an efficient manner.

Call it:

MyType me = New<MyType>.Instance();

Note that (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t) will fail for string. Hence special handling for string is in place to return empty string.

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downvoter, eh?? –  nawfal Sep 27 '13 at 15:59
1  
It is strange how a look at one line of someone's code can save a day. Thank you, sir! Performance reasons took me to your post and the trick is done :) FormatterServices and Activator classes are underperforming compared to compiled expressions, what a pity one finds Activators all around the place. –  jmodrak Nov 17 '13 at 6:19

couldn't you simply use default(T) ?

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6  
That returns null for classes. –  Aistina Dec 26 '08 at 0:53

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