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I have a collection of say 8 elements. I want to traverse it in such a way, that after 2 iterations I do something else, and then back to traversing.

A practical application is making a layout. I lay two square boxes, then I print a new line, and then I lay two square boxes.

is there a way I can make a sequence collection into something like this using Linq? Maybe using the Group by clause? Can't think of a solution though.

Collection --> "1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8"

Want to print like

1 2

3 4

5 6

7 8

share|improve this question
    
One way to think about it is to make a 2D array using Linq. – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 12:39
    
+1 non-trivial extension method. – SLaks Oct 11 '10 at 12:47
    
@haliving: I'm slightly confused about the requirements. Can you provide sample input, sample output? Thanks. – Ani Oct 11 '10 at 12:52
    
@Ani: Added more info, does that help? – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 12:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use an extension method such as the following:

public static IEnumerable<Tuple<TElement, TElement>> AsPairs<TElement>(this IEnumerable<TElement> @this)
{
    IEnumerator<TElement> enumerator = @this.GetEnumerator();

    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        TElement left = enumerator.Current;

        if (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            TElement right = enumerator.Current;

            yield return Tuple.Create(left, right);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("this", "Expected an even number of elements.");
        }
    }
}

...
foreach (Tuple<TextBox, TextBox> pair = textBoxes.AsPairs())
{
    ...
}

Edit: Added exception in uneven enumerable case.

share|improve this answer
    
Metaphorical +1. Excellent. – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 12:50
    
Tuple is .NET 4.0, let me try there .. should work, I'll probably grab a touple for .net 3.5 from somewhere. – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 12:50
    
also, what is the @ symbol for .. no exceptions? – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 13:02
    
That's a good solution. I first thougt of getting all elements with a even index via an Where-clause and then using Zip like this: even.Zip(elements.Except(even), (a, b) => new { a=a, b=b}); – sloth Oct 11 '10 at 13:03
    
But his would propably not work in all situations, since Where/Except can destroy your ordering IIRC – sloth Oct 11 '10 at 13:04

could you do something that uses skip and take

collection.Take(2) - takes first 2 elements
collection.Skip(2).Take(2) - skips first 2 and takes elements 3 and 4 

etc

i am not sure of the code that you have but im sure this may help if you can use it

share|improve this answer
    
This will involve significant extra enumeration. – SLaks Oct 11 '10 at 12:46

There are no built-in LINQ methods that should be used to do this.
You could abuse Aggregate to do this, but I wouldn't recommend it.

If you want to, you can write your own.

For example:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Subdivide<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int groupsize) {
    using(var e = source.GetEnumerator()) {
        while(true) {
            bool isFinished = false;
            var g = Subgroup(e, groupsize, b => isFinished = b);
            if (isFinished)
                yield break;
            else
                yield return g;
        }
    }
}

static IEnumerable<T> Subgroup<T>(IEnumerator<T> e, int size, Action<bool> finishedSetter) {
    finishedSetter(true);
    int c = 0;
    while(e.MoveNext() && ++c <= size) {
        finishedSetter(false);
        yield return e.Current;
    }
}            

EDIT: This cannot work, by definition. Due to lazy evaluation, nested iterators cannot be relied upon.
Instead, you can use the following method:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Subdivide<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int groupSize) {
    var currentGroup = new List<T>(groupSize);
    foreach(var item in source) {
        currentGroup.Add(item);
        if (currentGroup.Count == groupSize) {
            yield return currentGroup;
            currentGroup = new List<T>(groupSize);
        }
    }
    if (currentGroup.Count != 0) 
        yield return currentGroup;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd love to see the abusive aggregate solution. – halivingston Oct 11 '10 at 12:51

Here's your solution

    private static void TraverseInTwos()
    {
        var col = new Collection<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 };
        int i = 0;
        while (col.Skip(i).Any())
        {
            var newCol = col.Skip(i).Take(2);
            Console.WriteLine(newCol.First() + " " + ((newCol.Count() > 1) ? newCol.Last().ToString() : string.Empty));
            i += 2;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That's unreadable and very slow IMHO – sloth Oct 11 '10 at 13:06
    
It might be a matter of habit, but in any case, OP asked for a linq-based solution and I provided one. Performs ok actually. – danijels Oct 11 '10 at 13:10
    
Of course it performs OK -- you only have 8 elements. Try it with 1,000,000 elements and see if it's still OK. – Gabe Oct 11 '10 at 13:56

Here you go :)

var ten = Enumerable.Range(20, 10);
var pairs = ten.Select((i,index) => new { group = (index >> 1), val = i }).GroupBy(a => a.group);

foreach (var pair in pairs)
{
    foreach (var i in pair) Console.Write(i.val + " ");
    Console.WriteLine();
}

/Moberg

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